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January 21, 1925 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1-21-1925

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAYx

JANUARY 21 1923

- ..

Published every morning except Monday
during the Universit yyear by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively Cn-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
listed therein.J
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,I
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
subscriptionby carrier, $3.5o; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; busi-
ness, 960.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and 176.1
MANAGING EDITOR
PHILIP M. WAGNER
Editor--------------.John G. Garlinghouse
News Editor........... .Robert G. Ram say
City Editor............Manning Houseworth
Night Editors
George W. Davis Harold A. Moore
Thomas P. Henry Fredk. F. Sparrow, Jr.
Kenneth C. Keller Norman R. thal
Sports Editor......William H. Stoneinan
Sunday Editor.........Rouert S. Man field
Women's E<ditor .......... ...Vernea Moran
Music and Drama...Robert B. Henderson
Telegraph Editor....William J. Walthour
Assistants
Louist Barley Helen S. Ramsay
Marion Barlow Regina Reichmann
Leslie S. Bennets Marie Reed
Smith Cady 3r. Edmarie Schrauader
Willard dy.rosby Frederick H. Shillito
Valentine L. Davies C. Arthur Stevens
James W. Fernamberg Marjory Sweet
sphO. Gartner Herman Wise
Mnn.ng Houseworth Eugene H. Gutekunst
Elizabeth S. Kennedy Robert T. DeVore
Elizabeth Liebermann Stanley C. Cri hton
Winfield R. Line Leonard C. Wall
Carl E. Ohlmacher Thomas V. Koykka
William C. Patterson Lillias K. Wagner
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
WM. D. ROESSEk
Advertising...................E. L. Dunne
Advertising.....................JJ. Finn
Advertising.,......... l. A. Marks
Advertisinga. .......iM.Rockwell
Accounts................. Byron Parker
Circulation...................R. C. Winter
Publication....................John Conlin
Assistants
P. W. Arnold W L. Mullins
W. F. Ardussi K. F. Mast
Burris +i. l. N.vn'naun"
F. Dentz :: Thomas Olmstead
Philip Deitz T. D. Ryan,
David ;Fox. N. Rosenzweig
Norman Freehling MarosenStdburg
W. E. Hamaker F. .'Schoenfeld
F. Johnson S. H-. Sinclair
L. H. Kramer F. Taylor.
Louis W. Kramer
WEDNtSDAY, JANUARY 21, 1925
Night Editor-F. K. SPARROW, JR.
CONNIVINGS OF LANDLADIES j
Ann Arbor landladies have in tire
Past and present been accused of
many things, many unforgiveable sins.
They are said to have charged high

U. S. IN THE WORLD1.
The irreconcilables with Senator
Borah, chairman of the Foreign Rela- UASTED 1' M U sic
ions committee, and Senator Hiram AND B
Johnson of California as their leaders REFRAIN: _
LOA , A__
are up in arms once again, this time TZOB-D R A M A
because of the signing of the finance TZOBE
1 1protocol in Paris last week by the new1t
Secretary of State, Frank B. Kellogg. Song of Big Russia THIS AFTERNOON: The 0rgan Re-
In fact, they are preparing to wage The rain swoops, the Sun rises. cital in Hll auditorium at 4:15
a bitter fight over the foreign policies All the grass is gay with dew. o'tock.
of the administration if they discover, Sashka says to his friend, TONIGHT: "The Playboy of the
upon the arrival of the complete text: "Petrovich, last night you walkedi Westen World" by J. It. Synge Inr
of the Paris pact, that Ambassador in the garden, University hall at 8 o'clock.IG R
Kellogg has done what they all fear-I With a beautiful lady." * * * (Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk)
overthrown the traditional avoidance: Ay luli, etc. CLAYTON HAMILTON
of entangling alliances and stepped "Who was she, Petrovich?". An ntervew, +yCRobert Henderson.
An interview, by Robert Henderson.
right into European affairs, as Euro- 1 "Oh Sashka," says his friend,Iad t e
pean statesmen and press have al- "Vain fool, that's what you is." If escapiInence of a i-. idealism we usually connect with mu- =-iillllillliiitllllit i11Ull iIC l littlli
he had escaped the influence of a uni-
ready assumed. "Why?" asked Sashka. versity and a Professor Brander Mat- sicians; and he is a very fine actor.
On the other hand, President Cool- Ay luli, etc. thews, if he had come even more in- In the scene with his mother in the t
idge, administration laders, and even "That was no lady- tiIatel in touch with the gallous- last act, when he is giving up Anna
Secretary Hughes, at the urgent re- That was my wife." for his music, he is really superb. In-
ness of the Broadway world, the .gent-, f
quest of the President, have parried Ay luli, etc. s h roo t n cidentally Mr. Peters designed the two
ly str humor of his conversation
with a frantic denial, stating that I* * * that now softly amuses his audiences scenes, which are strikingly realistic.
Ambassador Kellogg, by signing the PERHAPS YOU SAW THIS AND would have grown in all probability And so we have a new play, a good
agreement, has merely made certain PERHAPS YOU DIDNT ts play, with as good a cast as could be
tha th ntdSatswudrcev tiejt noo the steely cynicism of a George ply it sgodac.ta.cudb
that the United States would receive Jean Nathan. As it is, erhaps the put together in the country. Detroit
her share of the German rparations Coasting Party twist of his career formed his per- was enthusiastic, consideri~ng they
and has in no way obligatedi hersef -
About 5 students, both men and sonality to a more balanced end. sure- nature of the play and the general
to insure the collection of the money yeo msmntcae yDtot
either for herself or for the othey wonien, met at the Congregational y to a more convincing one. type of amusement craved by Detroit-
churcjt yesterday afternoon for a to- It is peculiar, this persistent subtle ers. What will New York say? HOME COOKING
Whi e no definite conclusion can be -o ggansiU party on the hills east of sophistry one meets in all men of his REE LAlTGE DINING ROOM
liWihcstnoa i There were several pairs class, in George Pierce Baker, in According to a recent court decision TH EEL ARGE DINING ROOMS
reac ed u til he c mTherepat wereA RIpairD G
ed the at f s A toboggans, and several Louis Untermeyer and Stuart P. Sher- in Boston, one need not be drunk to VA RdtITYe LyD GiEon
bobv i tedthe crowd. Rev. E. Knox man: it is a stone wall that consis- be driving under the influence of
that Ambassador Kellogg's action was Mitchell had charge of the party. tently baffles anyone in a yeasty age. liquor. What then, judge, just ^ 011 Church St. Under New Management
just exactly what European statesmen 1 f 'ii * * * ,Meeting Mr. Hamilton personally, this "happy"? itil111illilliIIlii
have interpreted it to be. But then, ,--i ea nn
why there should be any cause we be charged with log roll- is even more apparent than i h
worry over the situation? Secretar Ing 'Church over Against the lecture-it is gracious, very interest-
Hughes and President Coolidgo areA Tiverity alias 'The Stone Church ing but very fostonese.
w)2Innar Hert' w anouce Speakting of the development of
right in their stand that it has little2 wvkltW arm Heart,' we announce Sekn ftedvlpeto
s herewith that we do NOT reprint this of dramatics throughout the colleges
significance as a radical step toward 1 of the country, he pointed out the ap-
'a new foreign policy, the excitemeni item in the hope that Mr. Jump's ofthtcfoty,"elomedtutrhces
il e ovr and heycrsisewill charge will increase. parent miracle of the situation: in Flestve ad te rwestilrhve .
been postponed. If the fears of !orah2 Oifn that it will continue as Sheridan's day only actors, or their
and Johnson are well-founded, how large ~a .i is.(sisters and their cousins and their
* * * aunts ever wrote for the stage, ever
ever, and the European statesmen arelE a y t but h r o p
evr n h uoensaemnae. .were of the theatre. Today all the R~ O say , U rt put
right, the United States has at last; The,,,Item is, however, strongly ler ote theatrofessod Balr's Et
succumbed to the inevitable and has reminiscent of the social gathering cubatoromte oferva n rium
recognized that the wdrld is too small for the benefit of the Band that took ; tto a r w m
for her to remain aloof from active place at the Union the other after- phantly. dramatically moved to Yale, into e c t. t s tne comn-
-and of the actual artisans themselves
participation in international affairs. noon. It was called, I believe, a tea
ldance-in the vigorous publicity story it is no longer the question what col
_n__ _ _i i 4*4

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.i
;
,,
i
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MILLIONS PER YEAR
Figures which show graphically the
way in which wealth is distributed in}
this country came to light recently,
in the report of the Income Tax unit
for the year 1922. It was found that
67 persons had reported incomes of.
over a million dollars for the year,
that of the total income tax of $861,-f
057,308 which was collected, approxi-
mately $50,000,000 of it had been
handed in by these 67 persons. It was
further declared that nine persons re-,
ported incomes of $3,000,000 or more
annually, and four paid the necessary
taxes for incomes of more than $5,-
000,000.
The announcement that so large a
slice of the nation's annual income
lies in the hands of 67 individuals will
make the socialists boil. "It is notl

that ran in The Dail; but only 13
couples and seven stags turned out.
Why didn't someone hire, say, Hill,
Hall, and give a tete a tete there for
the benefit of the Union pool?

ege thney came from bout what Crater-
nity they belonged to . .
Naturally, his enthusiasm for Mrs.
Fiske is unb)ounded, her Dusesque se-
elusion being t e wonder of her press-
agents. She never sees visitors, andE

nation responsible, by the
way, for our unusual success

#s

rents, given inadequate service, and!
intrigued unsuspecting freshlpen into
contracts which they did not under-
stand. With some justification these

closely. religiously locks herself in
I1n a little while we are going to her suite of rooms (uring the day
mark a paragraph 'Personal,' and we even her meals are brought to her.
are trusting that everyone who has Promptly at four o'clock she drives to
no reason to expect a personal mess- the theatre, only to lock herself again
age from us will skip it. And we don't!in her dressing room for four hours
want a lot of people reading it just until the play beg'ns. Finally, after
because they think we MIGHT be the performance she promptly drives
sending them a personal , message, to her room, her whole life literally
either. If you haven't sent me a let- bound up in the eight appearances
ter in the last two days at my home she makes each week on the stage.
address, and signed it 'An observer,' As n epilogue, he spoke of the pos-
you are not the person for whom this sibility of bringing her production of
personal is intended. "The Rivals" to Ann Arbor the early
* * * part of March, probably in Hill audi-
Personal torium. The idea is not impossible-
We don't quite understand who is to "the actors can spit their lines at the
get the reward in this search. You audience -in a Sheridan comedy, not
are ambiguous. I should be glad to pretend they are alone as modern
advertise for you-know-whom-but I plays require," Mr. Hamilton added-
don't want any misunderstand ng and the only question is whether the
about it. Does you-know-who get the campus would really want it. Five f
reward or do I? thousand is a lot of people, but there
Yours in haste, is really no doubt of the audience:
J. (% fivo thousand came to the Color Or-

I
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Up sta irs,

Cafeteria

N1 ickeIs

A r c a d e

;Ur

""4

4-

nefarious practices have been laid fair," they will say, "that these few
against them, but never did the Uni- !should have so much, while others
versity suspect them of conniving to have so little." But after all, without
institution. the initiative displayed by those 67
defeat the projects of the inpersons in building up their giant in-
Yet if we are to believe the report of dustries, there would be fewer nix-
a secret meeting. held by the land- uries and fewer jobs for the many to-

T'

,
3"
FI

I
'3.
i,
I
r

i

ladies' association and representatives
of the real estate branch of the Cham-
ber of Commerce, such a npvement Is
now under way.
The landladies, and the real estate
men, it sets, .are alarmed at the in-
roads mad 'gainst their business by'
the increasedtnumber of fraternities
and soroyj ieo, by the new Law club,
and Fletcher hall and at the reports
that University authorities are con-
sidering a comprehensive dormitory
system. They propose to bring pres-
sure to bear through the Chamber of
Commerce of Ann Arbor if the Uni-
versity shows any tendency to en-
courage such a system.
It is ridiculous to suppose in the

day. The need for capital is an in-
escapabi economic fact, and thosej
immense incomes (most of which go
back immediately into active economic!

4

* * *

gan.

* * *

f
I'

1111service again) are quite necessary TheUniversityIealth Service has
evils, unimportant when compared a lit of signs hung up around its of-
with the good done by the capital five-just as all business firms, no
which they represent. yt tter of what sort, have little wall
which__hey___present. m toes, like K eep Sm iling, and Do
It Now; and little rhymes about Hle
One would hardly expect the Demo- o an te rhyme abou lie
t tobe in ~ngbutop-,4who saves the Bass's time will live
cratic senators to be anything but op something I forget what.
posed to President Coolidge in his gue The Health Service rhymes and
________nstand. tthoes d jl, as you might expect,
S G s oijth the gfheral topics of health, dis-
Since Groesbeck is said to favor t, ,fe i, ulgt tcadae
the new state finance bill ought to b - f te ainig etc., an are
run through rather easily. t ntertaining bunch of little
runthoug rthr esiy.epigras. ut one of them gives a !

THE ORGAN RECITAL
The next number of the Twilight
Organ Recitals by Mr. Palmer Chris.
tian will be given this afternoon in
Hill auditorium at 4:15 o'clock, and
will include the following numbers:
Allegro moderato e serioso (Sonata)
... Mendelssohn
Rfomince (Symphonv 4)......Vierne
Minuetto antico e Musetta ....,.Yon
R'ide des Princesses (The Bird of
Fire) .................Strawinsky
Symphonic Chorale, "Ach bleib mit
deiner Gnade" .........Karg-Elert
Caprice .....................Barnes)
To the Rising Sun........Torjussen
In the Church ................ Novak

frpa tat Ca enimpression. . . .
first place that the Chamber of Cam- CAMPUS OPINION 1'te this one-neatly framed an d
merce, an organization that has al-I A nonvmus communications will he under glass:
ways supported University policies, d iregarded. The names of comnuni-
,ants will. however, hie rewarded as K~lord, I wonder what fool it was that
would back any such absurd move- confidential upon request. irst, invented kissing?
ment; and, supposing they did, that - -Swift.
the University would be at all infiu- DETROIT ART EXHIBIT /st'like that-as if Swift. in a bril-
enced to change whatever policy it To the Editor: l-nikoent, had sort of dashed it
might have in mind. If the adminis- There is a wonderful exhibition ofo msh
tration decides that well-equipped paintings by old Dutch masters being Well, he did nothing of the kind.
dormitories for the majority of men shown at the Detroit Institute of Arts. He once wrote however, a 'Manual of
and women of the University are es- No one should miss this rare oppor1 Polite Conversation,-which purported
sential, they will be provided as soon tunity, the exhibition containing a to be the directions on how to get;
as sufficient funds are forthcoming very famous Vermeer, eight Rem- along in society but was in reality a
whatever the landladies may or may brandts, five Frans Hals, two Ter- play in which every line of every
not do. borchs and a most wonderful Hob- I character was a bromide then fash-
Those who operate rooming houses, bema ,bes:des painting of other great ionable in London society.
however, should have no malice to- masters of the Dutch school. The brilliant epigram above was
ward anyone or any agency for killing Mr. Clyde Burroughs, executive sec- one of these lines.
what they consider their business. If retary writes: "Needless to say, we
rooming houses had adequately have never had in the city of Detro:t We don't know how to make a para-
housed the student body there would an exhibition so stimulating to the
have been no particular reason for artistic conscioustiess of the people. j'tholitt berdherytsrnino
University competition such as is pro- It would require a trip to the capitals corner of the College Inn Show-win-
vided in the Law club. Such projects of Europe to see so many pictures of do,
as (dow calls himself "The Sock King.'"
as Fletcher hall, built by an associa- I the high quality of those of this ex-M allshimselfaheoSoksKin."
tion of alumni, were started when the hibition and the Arts Commission and k u *
University was growing very rapidly the members of the Museum staff want
nd the point of saturation had not to do everything in their power to How many of you skipped the para-
yet been reached. If the University have the collection seen by the whole graph marked 'personal?'
is considering similar buildings for population of the city." I'm disappointed in you, custom-
its dormitory system the landladies The exhibition has been attended by ers. .
have little cause for worry concern- 1,600 to 2,000 people daily, the evening Mr. Jason Cowles.j
ing coadpetition. attendance running between 500 and

i t .
-C
-
VIA
Cpyright 1924 Hart Schaffner & Marx
1s
It's easy to buy a
big, warm overcoat
in this clearance
sale,. for all go at '
one-half price and
at one-thirdl ess!
REULE-CONLIN

"THE DEPTHS"
A review ,by Clarice Tapson.
"The Depths" comes as a bitter pill,
dramatically speaking, after the ro-
mance of "Smilin' Thru" and, more
recently, of "Romeo and Juliet;" but
Jane Cowl administers it with the
same histrionic skill that made her
performances in these other two
vehicles almost institutions.
The similarity between the title of
this play and that of Gorky's "The
Lower Depths" is not-to be ignored,
for the likeness extends to the plays
themselves. A Viennese setting in-
stead of a Muscovian, a little less of
the terrible sordidness present in thej
Russian play, the introduction of a
level of society higher and more ideal-
istic, these are different. But the gen-
eral atmosphere, the general note of
fatality, of the utter uselessness of
struggling, the air of stark tragedy,
all these are here in this new play.
which is incidentally from the pen of
Dr. Hans Mueller, as they are in
Gorky's.
Jane Cowl's performance is really
remarkable . She is able to convey

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