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September 27, 1924 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 9-27-1924

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TH MCHGA AIY SI

Boundary Line Dispute
Still Far From Settlement

27 MICHIGAN MEN
DO R0 ESEARCH WORKI

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800 Colege Men in Laboratories
Telephone and Electric
Companies

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HANDLE WIRE PROBLEMS
Twenty-seven University of Mich-
igan men are members of the big team
of 800 college graduates who are in
the research laboratories of the Am-
erican Telephone and Telegraph com-
pany and the Western Electric com-
pany in New York. Their work cov-
ers a wide range in telephone and ra-
dio problems; one group makes studies
of human speech and hearing, another
is at work on improved apparatus, anl
still others are studying the habits
of flying electrons.
While Eastern, institutions lead as
to numbers, the institutions from
which graduates have come include
those of almost every state in the Un-
ion. For example, there are 23 grad-
uates from Purdue and 18 from Wis-
consin; Massachusetts Institute of
Technology heads list with 65, and
next is Cornell with 47.
"Industrial research has a growing
fascination for the college graduate
with a scientific turn of mind," said
John Mills, the department's person-
nel director. "The physicist, the chem-
ist, the mathematician, the engineer'
are so closely mixed with executive
and commercial types of mind that4
each one may profit by the ideas and
experience of the others."
The greater variety of work in aI
largeorganization fosters individual
growth, according .to Mr. Mills. As a[
man's mental life develops changes of
interest occur which may find expres-
sion within a large organization in
changes of work rather than in seek-
ing a new position. Each may divert
his thoughts into a new channel with-
out any serious break with the past,

for the job can vary with the indi-
vidual's changing interest.
"Individuality of aim, of opportuin-
ity, and of reward together with the
stimulus and stability of the group,
said Mr. Mills, "in my experience, have
proved the outstanding advantages to
college men in associating themselves
with the technical staff of the modern
industrial research laboratory. Many
successes have been made and are
under way in this field of industry."
Madison, Wis., Sept. 26.-hundreds
of copies of a booklet giving advice
to future freshman women were sent
out from the University of Wisconsin
this fall.
UPPER ROOM
BIBLE CLASS
First meeting of the new school
year Saturday evening at 7
o'clock. Upper Room, Lane
Hall.
All University men are cordially
invited.

Damon-
"Hey, there! Aren't you a friend
of mine?"
Pythias-
"I certainly am. I'd do anything
in the world for you. Yes, any.
thing!1"
Damon-
"All right-prove it! Give me back
that Eldorado pencil you borrowed
last night."
DRO'
17aesW-allteateAd
Read the Want Ads

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Fl'R STAB
T2wo cswat~es thci

SHORTJ-IAND
TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
SECRETAR IAL
Classes Now Forming
HAMIILTON USiNESS
COiLLEGE
State and Williams

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It's
a wonder
ORONA Four is ther
sensationfthe type-
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Standard keyboard and
big machine features
throughout.Sturdy,sub-
stantial, but light enough
to carry anywhere. Only
$60 with case.
O. D. MORRILL
Dealer
14 NICKELS' ARCADE
The Stationery and Typewriter Store
fATTENTION

A map showning the disputed area, Sir James Craig,
President Cosgrave

(above) and (below)

By JACKSON V. JACOBS
Central Press Correspondent
London, Sept. 26.-The Irish boun-
dary line controversy is as far from
settlement as ever, and the prospects
of settlement between Ulster and the
Free State is increasing daily.
Sir James Craig, the premier of
Ulster, continues to refuse to name
a representative to the boundary
line commision' provided for in theI
Anglo-Irish reaty engineered by Mr.
Llyod George when premier. He in-
sists that Ulster was no party to
the treaty, that the boundaries of
NorthernIreland were fixed by the
Government of Ireland, Act, in 1920,
and could not be subsequently tam-
pered with by the British parlament!
whether in a treaty or otherwise
without Ulster's consent.
He refuses to have anything to do
with the commision, but he is will-
ing, he says, to settle the matter by
private agreement between Presi-
dent Cosgrave and himself. Cosgrave
refuses to do this and insists that thet
British government go ahead with
the boundary commission.
A Fantastic Frontier
The present British government,
which is not in any way responsiblef
for the treaty, does not know what toI
do, and is doing virtually nothing.I
The present Free States-Ulster bor-
der is more than a thousand miles
Everything is up to the government
of Northern Ireland.
long. In one place a railway crosses
it twelve times in 10 miles.
Nowhere it seems, are the econom-
ic and geographical conditions com-
patible with the wishes of the in-
habitants.

In the village of Beleek the boun-
dary runs through the center of the
main street. The Free Staters buy
their postage stamps on one side of
the street for two-pence each and the
Northerners buy theirs across the
road for three halfpence. Cigarettes
are a shilling a pack on the Ulster
side and fifteen pence on the Free
State side.
Coming of Republic Seen i
It is generally agreed that the bor-
der needs some of the curliques ta-
ken out of it. But that isn't all there
is to the problem, merely straighton-
ing out of the boundary line. The'
Free Staters claim they should get
the entire counties of Tyrone and
Fermanagh, Derry Ctty and large
portons of Armagh' and County Down
In London it is supposed that the
Irish republic is going to present
itself one of these days, and the
boundary controversy enhances the
prospect. -
CORRE CTION
The Daily wishes to correct a mis-,
statement in yesterday's issue which
stated that the dental clinic will open
on Oct. 29. The dental clinic will
open next ^Monday, Sept. 29, fully
prepared to care for students' teeth.
ARCADE
Starting To-morrow

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After strenuous exercise of any sort, what
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nerves are quieted, the whole body is re-
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Of course, Muffin Alkohol has dozens of
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Splendid relief for tired, aching feet; great
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germicide.
Muffin Alkohol is denatured by a formula
which actually improves it for external use.
College; teams and many other athletic
organizations use Mifflin Alkohol regu-
larly. Be sure YOU get MIFFLIN-in the
handy-grip one-pint bottles as illustrated.

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Type is Engravers Gothic, designed
especially for cearness and goodtaste
Just send your name and address
(write or print clearly) with $1.00
(west of Denver and outside of the,
U. S. $110) and tis generous box of
stationery wi11 core toyou neatly
loxed, postage prepaid. Money re-
fuded if you are not more than
Prepaid
Posage
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1036 Beaubien St. Detroit, Mich.

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UNIVERSITY

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SCHooL OF USIC

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Maynard, Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan

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Fall Semester Begins Sept. 23

204 North Main Street

Phone 2355

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A Word of Importance
TO

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Columbia Records

1 I

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SWEET LITTLE YOU
ECCENTRIC
I WANT TO BE HAPPY
SUSQUEHANNA
DREAMER OF DREAMS
COME BACK TO ME
PLEASE
CHARLESTON CABIN

.

Played by
Band,

Ted Lewis and His

California
Romanccrs
Califolnia

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Ramblers

House Managers
In order to promote a better acquaintance
with our clientele we have had construct-
ed for their general use a ruler of unusual
worth. The cost of these makes general
distribution prohibitive, so we have ar-
ranged that you, house managers call and
receive yours for your fraternity or sor-
ority. When will we see you?

EARL V. MORE, Musical Director
THEODORE HARRISON, Head of Voice Department
GUY MAIER, Head of Pianoforte Department
SAMUEL P. LOCKWOOD, Head of Violin Department
PALMER C HRISTIAN, Head of Organ Department
WILFRED WILSON, Head of Wind Instrument Department
JOSEPH E. MADDY, Head of Methods Department
BYRL FOX BACNER, Dean of Women
and the following artist teachers:

Ramblers

Ava Comin Case (Piano),, Marian Struble Freeman (Violin), Andrew Haigh
(Piano and Theory), Nora Crane Hunt (Voice), Maude C. Kleyn (Voice), Grace John-
son-Konold (Voice), Edith Koon (Piano), Ora Larthard (Cello), Clara Lundell (Piano),
Martha D. Merkle (Piano), Maude Okkelberg (Piano), Mabel Ross Rhead (Piano),
Grace Richards (Piano), Helen Snyder (English), Otto J. Stahl (Piano and Theory),
Nell B. Stockwell (Piano), Nora B. Wetmore (Voice), Anthony J. Whitmire (Violin).

- and others -

Phonograph and Piano foreRent

Phonographs, and Pianos for Tent

I

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