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November 02, 1924 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 11-2-1924

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ications.
Conference Editorial

ssociated Press is exclusively en-
he use for republication of all news
credited to it or not otherwise
t his paper and the local news pub-
at the postofice at Ann Arbor,
as second class matter. Special rate
granted by Third Assistant Post-
neral.
>ion by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; busi-
EDITORIAL STAFF
lephones 2414 and 17NM
MANAGING EDITOR
PHILIP M. WAGNER
......John G. Garlinghouse
tor...........Robert G. Ramsay
Night Editors
V. Davis Joseph Kruger
P. Henry ohn Conrad a"
C. Keller Noman R. Tha
litor ........Willam H. Stoneman
ditor........Robert S. Mansfield
Editor. . ....Verena Moran
d Drama.Robert B. Henderson
E aditor. William J. Wathour
Assistants
rley Winfield H. Line
arlow Harold A. 'Moore
Bennets Carl E. Ohlmacher
cknell William C. Pattersa
licxer ' ielen S. Ramsay
ly Jr. Regina Reichmann
crosby Marie Reed
L. Davies Edmarie Schrauder
Feramberg Frederick H. Shillito
Gartner F~redk. K. Sarrow, Jr.
Mouseworth C. Arthur Stevens
S. Kennedy Marjry Sweet
Liebermaun rFreeric Telmos
. Line Herman J. Wise
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
iUSINESS MANAGER
WM. D. ROESSER
g.................E. L. Dunne
g.......... J.J Finn
g.................. A. Marks
1....H M. Rockwell
f ..... ..Byron Parker
... RC. Winter
I..... .... ....John W. Conlin
Assistants
nold W L. Mullins
-dussi K F. Mast
urrns H. L. Newmann
Thomas Olmstead
itz . 1. Ryan
. Rosenzweig
preehling Margaret Sandburg
amaker F. K. Scloenfeld
nt S. H.Sinclair
ramer F. Taylor
Kramer
DAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1924
ditor4THOS. P. HENRY, JR.
HIGAN AT THE' POLLS
lal politics are now at a high
ily two days remain in which
a decision concerning the na-
ate, and local issues confront-
voter- Seldom, if ever, in the
ce of the present college gen-
has the presidentialcontest
btterly fought and the out-
uncertain. In fact it is this
er strife which has character-
whole campaign that has re-
a a certain confusing of the
placing the emphasis on the
ity of the candidates.
second section of The Daily
y are found.three partisan ar-
oncerning the policies and
es of' the Republican, Demo-
nd Progressive parties. In the
columns from time to time
as been a non-partisan dis-
of Coolidge, LaFollette, Davis
r running mates with a view
esting students in an active
ation of the issues at stake.

will be cast our paltry thousand or so
seems negligible. The fact remains,
however ,that our influence is felt, our
vote is sought. We, the students of
America, are the coming governors,
presidents, diplomatic offiers, sena-
tors, and representatives. As such
Michigan and other universities and
colleges of the country will go to
the polls Tuesday.
THE HEYDAY OF AMAZONS
In these days when it is no longer
uncommon to read of a man as the
Ihusband of his wife, it is a little un-
usual to find anyone who has the cour-
age to say that the present-day liberty
of woman has never equalled that
which she enjoyed in the ancient days.
Yet, that is just exactly what Rev.
Alexander J. Carlyle, Litt. D., lecturer
in politics and economics in University
college and Lincoln college, Oxford,
said to a group of students and pro-
fessional men in Boston a few nights'
ago, according to the Boston Eve-
ning Transcript.
He explains himself by. referring to
the seventh century when Romanj
Stoics were expressing the new idea
of liberty, and, that almost simultan-
eously their contemporaries, the Ro-
man lawyers, were freeing the slave,
the child, and the woman from the
bonds that held them to their masters.
Dr. Carlyle hold his audience that
"it was probable that woman had not
been so completely emancipated in
modern days as she was between the
first and fifth centuries of the present
era, when the great transition from
convention to liberty may clearly be
traced.".. What the noted scholar ex-
actly means by this is a bit hard to
determine unless one goes further In-
to his doctrine of liberty as he ex-
pressed it in this same speech, to the
effect that "it never existed in full
and never will."
In hisrevelations of the past ages,
it is a noticeable fact that he neglected
to mention King Solomon, who has
never recorded as being known by the
name of anyone of his thousand wives.
Nor did Dr. Carlyle mention Henry
the Eighth,rthe terrible "bluebeard"
of history and the many others whom
he typifies, in an exaggerated manner
to be sure. Nor is it absolutely neces-
sary to delve into the archives of the
oldest of ancient history to find male
despots ruling with the iron hand
over their harems.
That thesegood old days are gone
forever may be evidenced on all sides
in our modern American woman who
has a career of her own, wields the
same political power and has the same
political rights as her husband, and,
in a few' cases, has been known to
force the man shetmarries to take her
name. No, though the Idea is an admir-
able one, a considerable reversion to
the past would be necessary to make!
it come true.
The Prince is gone -there must
now be a wild scramble for features
to fill up the metropolitan papers.
Please do not take away our
Northern Lights, Mr. Steffansson.

THE BETTERI LI
MAN WIVON
DRAMA
Enter Harvey from Right. Enter1
Elmer from left.
HARVEY: How they goin Elmer?
ELMER: Fine thanks.
HARVEY: Well whaddya know?
ELMER: Not a darn thing, honest,
Harve.
HARVEY: Well what's the word?.
ELMER: Jake, Harve, Jake.
HARVEY: Glad to hear it, Elmer.
IHow they been hittin?
ELMER: All four, Harve, all four.
HARVEY: That's fine. That's fine.
Say, you don't know what Harold's

IU S IC
AND
RAMA
THIS AFTERNOON: Mrs. Maier and
Mr. Harrison will appear in the
Faculty Concert in Hill auditorium at
4:15 o'clock.

PersnlChristmasCad
C ad~ilY.i.fii"OM.t.!.st4f". .. . . . , a.......i

* $ *

I

PALMER CHRISTIAN
Mr. Palmer ChristiaA, University
organist, will appear as soloists with
the Detroit Symphony orchestra in
the second Popular Concert this after-
noon. He will practically repeat the
program presented last year with such
success at the dedication of the new
Murphy organ.
The only variation will be the group
of solo pieces by Mr. Christian, which
will include the Bach Tocatta in C,
the Benediction of Karg-Elert, and
Sportive Fauns by d'Antaiffy. The
opening number of the concert will
be the Prelude to Wagner's "Die
Meistersingers" by the orchestra, and
the second half of the program will
be devoted to Saint-Saen's magnificent
Symphony in C minor for organ, piano,
and full orchestra.

41

GRAHAM W
2I-oth Ends of th~e Diagonal Walk

.............issss.r.u ni rr .. .i............. :. c.
:4 ,

.:.
...:

doing now, do ya?
,ELMER: Harold Stour?
HARVEY: Yeah.
ELMER: He's working
Rapids.
HARVEY: Izzat so? Lastl
was in Saginaw.

Exchange that unsatisfactory pen for a REAL Fountain Pen
This pen is pleasing for those who have never before found a satisfactory fountain pen.
It is simplicity itself.
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ider's en Shop
302 State Street

In Grand
I heard he

ELMER: Nope, he's been in GrandI
Rapids for three months now, selling
furniture.
HARVEY: The hell you say! Harold
selling furniture! Ha ha! I can't any
more imagine at guy selling furniture
than-ha ha!
ELMER: Well, it does seems kind
of funny to think of Harold selling
furniture-he loafed alla time in
school, didnee?
HARVEY: Loaf? I should hope to
tell YOU he loafed. He didn do any-
thing else BESIDES loaf, at guy.
Selling furniture! At's a good one!
ELMER: Well, we all gotta work
some day.
HARVEY: (in a pre-occupied voice
-he is somehow aware that the hum-
or in the furniture situation is running
thin and that something else is want-
ed) Yeah, I spose so.
ELMER: Yeah, we all gotta work
some day. If it isn't furniture it's
something else.
HARVEY: Yeah. (then, brightly)
I Still plugging away at the old law,
Elm?
ELMER: Yes I am, Harve. Finish
this spring-maybe!
HARVEY: Maybe is good! I thought
I'd get, out of the Lit school last June'
-but you see me right here, doncha
boy?, Ha ha!
ELMER:a(who is now also con-
scious that the conversation is just
about played out) Jeze I got a ten
o'clock, Harve. I get to pea-talking
and I never WOULD go to a class!

O....CO.............. r........ ...............
_OC TOB E R, 1 92 4__

MRS. IAIER'S PROGRAM I
Mrs. Maier is opening the Faculty
Concert this afternoon with Percy
Grainger's familiar Irish Tune from
County Derry. The theme is a richly
lyric folk song, filled with a wistful,
persistent melancholy. The basic tune
surges and retards through the work,
quite in contrast to Grainger's usual
i pop-gun style.
The Bach Italian concerto, in con-
trast, represents the composer's most
florid, technical style. It is the kind
of niece an artist is never certain of,i
and even the greatest have been
known to make memory blunders over
it.
,Ganz's "The Pensive Spinner" and
the famous Mendelssohn-Liszt "On
Wings of Song" are highly classical -
mould, the one with the conventional,
maddening whir of the wheel in th
right hand and the melody in the
bass, the other with its poetic-
"grandeur" is the customary word.
The next group, to become definitely
modern, consists of Cervantes' five
Cuban miniatures. Lasting only about
a minute each, they catch all but suc-
cessfully the fickle theatric moods
of the southern temperament: jeal-
ously, a puppet-like funeral, curiosity,
and finally two wild syncopated
danzas.
Finally, Mrs. Maier will play the
popular Chopin Ballade in A flat. It
is gigantic,rcollosal-whatever you
will-and firmly satisfying to both the
pianist and audience; it is a gesture in
the grand manner, heroic, solemn and
gorgeous.
MR. WARING'S LITTLE BAND
A review, by Valentine Davies.
Tom Waring's Pennsylvanians, who
performed at the Majestic this past
week are not nearly what they should
be. They have quarts of pep and have
certainly achieved much by way of
race, but they do not come up to what
one may expect from a first class or.
chestra. There is nothing subtle or
harmonic in Waring's orchestrations:

S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 2J 30 31 ..
Notice
We clean and reblock hats and caps
and do it RIGHT You will appreciate
having your hat done over in a clean
and sanitary manner, free from odor 1
and made to fit your head.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard St. Phone 1792
(Where D. U. R. Stops at State)
.4 i l iltlllltl lli t 9E11l ed i 6 33t '
SWe serve fresh vegetables andl
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week $7.00, or $6.00 without
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S225 South Thayer Tel 951-W
Li
Lsncheefs inners and
Afternoon Teas

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Phone 3430

---

HARVEY: (starting off)
Don't take any lead nickels!
ELMER: Ha ha! Well, be
Harve!
HARVEY: Don't you worry
me, Elm!
ELMER: Drop upta the room
time, Harve!
IHARVEY: I will, Elmer.
throw a little bender one of
weekends, hey?

Yeah.
good,
about
some-
We'll
these

Don t Borrow-Subscribe Today.

i

W

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You

like

clean

soft

ELMER: Yeah-Call me up. I gotta
girl youd oughta meet.
HARVEY: Bring her round, bring
her round! What's holdin ya?
ELMER: Ha ha! Well, slong!
HARVEY: Slong!
They leave, seriatim.
* * #k

shirts we know.

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonnymons c'ommun cations will be
dilrgarded. 'Il.e names of communi-
cants will.mhoNAver, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

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blican club of the University To the Editor:
a noteworthy work on the It was morally certain that someone
providing for absentee vot- would set up the claim that my com-
in promoting last night's munication printed in Friday's Daily
n rally.. The Cooley-for- was written in ignorance of the fact
club has had an open air that Roosevelt died before the League
ic rally at which Dean Mort- was promulgated. I, therefore, closed
ooley outlined policies of the with a brief paragraph to cover this
ic party The Progressives point, but the communication appear-
their rally-all factions have ing to be over-long, the closing para-:
d in an effort to interest the graph was deleted. I trusted that my
n the government of which more discerning readers would ob-
soon form a prominent part serve that I specifically stated Mr.
t is said that never be- Roosevelt's shots were aimed at "Wil-
ie national political history son's preachments" and at those of the
an attempt been made to League to Enforce Peace. I leave the
ie support of the student public to judge whether such a league
roughout the nation. More as Roosevelt denounced is, or is not,
e been done at Michigan, but the one which emerged from the Paris
been accomplished is a de- I Conference--and this is after all the
ance over past years and real issue.
significant influence on the The theory of a "deathbed reprent-
meration of voters. ance" of Roosevelt, as set up by the
olitics, very naturally, have Covenanters, is based wholly upon
tressed on the campus. The the statement of Roosevelt referring
body, being cosmopolitan to Mr. Taft's views which was cited
ter, does not have a funda- by Mr. Ailes from Roosevelt's last
terest in the race for gov- dictation. In this statement, Roosevelt
the proposed income tax also says that he is very ",foggy" as
School amendment has to what The League really is, and he
ich discussion because it is i takes pains, therefore, to reitrate his
y identified with religious arguments against a league of the
n. The Daily has printed wrong kind.
us communications on the It is not often that I come back a
ne of which have been en- second time in a newspaper contro-
from religious feeling. How- versy, preferring to leave judgment'
reful and intelligent consid- to the public after both sides have
the question surely should once been stated. My chief reason'
he voter, be he Catholic or for departing from this policy is to,
, Klan or non-Klan, that point out that the editor's introduction
ment is opposed to the foun- to my communication quite incorrect-
religious liberty upon which ly reported Mr. Fisher's remarks. One
rnmental institutions are of Fisher's statements was that
e state has no facilties to "Roosevelt sided with Taft and Wil.
the thousands of students son" on the League. In the tract which
and parochial schools, it Fisher autographed and sold after his
ire to limit freedom of re- address, he says in his preface of the
ucation. A state monopoly League of Nations: "Here was oneo

This morning (yesterday morning ;iothing that carries you away by its
that is) I had the most remarkable ex- sImooth, flowing melody. There are
perience of my college career. I was even times when the cornets are blat
standing on the corner of State and ant and anything but pleasing.
North University, leaning against Mr. Waring seems to be still suf-
what I might call the Quarry Elm, fering under the illusion that any
when I was suddenly accosted by a brass instrument which gives forth
personable stranger-a young man. sounds that somewhat approximate
to all intents and purposes, of sound a bilious gentleman, is about the fun-
mind. niest thing in the world. It has also
Said he to me: 'I beg your pardon, apparently becomie an axiom among
but could you tell me where there is the various orchestra leaders that lie
a clothing store?" who plays the piano must sing. He
The Quarry Elm swayed with as- who plays for Waring is a good pian-
tonishment. I staggered, and looked ist. .
the young man in the eye. Then, re- Of course any _rchestra is a matter
covering my poise, I answered thus; of opinion, but ittdoes seem that an
"Sir, two doors to our right there is organization having six of its dozen
a clothing store. Two doors beyond instruments brass is a bit too boister-
that there is another. Directly across ous for the average mortal. The
the street from this tree (tapping the Pennsylvanian's seem to be a sort of
Quarry Elm) there is another. Two compromise between Paul Whiteman
doors from it to our left, there is an- and the Mound City Blue Blowers, but
other; Two doors beyond that is an- they reach neither height.
other; and two doors beyond that is.
another. Furthermore (I had him by "SWEETHEARTS"
the lapels, now, for he was beginning The leading lady in "Sweethearts,"
to edge away) if you go into any of a two act play to be given by Prof.
the stores on this street that are not Hollister's class Wednesday evening,
clothing stores and ask for-say-a is to make two complete changes of
necktie-they will not throw you out costume. Think of it. In the movies,
but will say 'Upstairs'." of course they do things- on a more
He fled. I have reported the inci- elaborate scale, but often the constant
dent to all the State Street clothiers, shifting of clothing by the actresses
and they have promised to make their of the screen is merely to show off
window displays louder than ever. their gorgeous gowns. In the play
- * * * "artecm " maizhes azenpr-

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White Swan launders
themthat way, other
things, too. The most

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.

All the freshmen seem to have
Fords with things painted on them.
Wisecracks.
I submit that this practice is a
dangerous one; for,
Yesterday I saw a young fellow in
such a car driving along State street.
Suddenly appeared another Ford, also
covered with wall mottoes etc. The
first man instantly turned his full
attention to the jests on the other
car-thinking, no doubt, to scare up
some good stuff for his own November

Sweethear ts, the changes are per-I
fectly appropriate. A gorgeous old;
rose crinoline in the first act indi-
cates youth, and in the second, laven-
dar trimmed in the legendary old lace
implies a very gentle, aged lady.
"Sweethearts" was written by W.
S. Gilbert in.the days when the fond
affections of youth were in style. It
is the. case of a dashing young manj
who goes to India, mad with the love
for a maiden. He returns in act two,
aged and crabbed and out of love. The
maiden is sad for a while, but the

White Swan
lI i 11nld PAT (fi~'

I 1

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