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October 28, 1924 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 10-28-1924

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?AY, OCT OBERE 28, 1924

THE MICHIGAN. DAILY

H UTO.'eek,s To Defeat
HOOVER TO CLL GOP eaoi OUSESENTERED FTER,
SFT CON IL ew J.ersey Race, GAME; PROPERTY TAKEN
. ~~'~- Saturday night, following the Ws
Wi-consin-Michigan game, five houses-
LatioumiJ Doss sA Api-V Brig' As 14; Mt
were entered and property amount-
Wrrant Remedy , ry ing tg more than $425 was stolen ac-
Secertl ry\ cording to the local police. From 1511
. 5 Washtenaw, $100 in cash was taken;
iCOMMI'TTEES APPOINTED0 from 914 Hill, $50 was taken; a watch
- a valued at,,$200 was lost at 1550 Wash-
Washingten, D. C., Q-1t. 27. - S~e f" tenaw; $75 was taken from 620 S.
Lary Herbrh oover, Of the Do-itrtp;. j ..,5 State; and an unknown amount was
anent of Cimerce, ,stacte1Ioall.r l t Itaken from 1443 Wastenaw.
ci nereeon strcet and higrw Y :saFehl r
for D e. 15, 16, and 17I, ar I he resst Iz rofssor """
of consultation wit~h various grou ...
interested Iin such <wmeeting.I! iep1r ya
"'rhe request, for a c l Lron cce fo Fre.:; Y nch D ipo a
'e purpose of better orgraniztion ill--
°fhc f orts to reduce 'the iiu;ibt oi When asked to comment on the re-
Saccidentsa now occuriimg in the tUito .1 tiremnent of the French diplomat, Jus-
;$tates," explained Secretary hoover, serand, Prof. William A. Prayer of
a swas proposed to ne six nmonthls4,0e . . the History department yesterday
aya number o1' nationral 1ass.ocationz characterized the ambassador as easi-
jinterewt Al in this field". ly the "ablest in the French diplo- °Egtseilcmiteit;ihamtesrie,
aotal muembei-ship of VO~hNep': rsswi "We were fortunate in having him,"
A.ppointed as follows: Statistics, traf- Professor Prayer said. "He is in
11c control, construction and jnin Bryce's class as an ambassador and
,leering, city planning .and, zoning, it' Fred W. onnelly, above, present the two are in a class by themselves
'suzrance, education, the motor vehlicle, mayor of Trenton, is the DemocraticI as diplomats of the last generation.
<aKnd public relations. Teprescvt: tivc.s nominee who will attempt to unseat Jusserand commanded his position
tsn these committees were chosen from Walter Edge, veteran New Jersey Re- very well at a time when the Ame-
"ttll parts of the country and.I nc u de publicaz senator. can people were most critical in. their
olice officials, highwtayt and unet r = attitude toward the Fenc.
chicle comnmissioner s, instrl~n;,ex,- "In his service, since the adminis-
erts, safety council members-, rlr - 1 ILTHJ1I~L~ M T tration of Roosevelt-mnore than
ers of chambers of commerce, labor , 01lIod MEELL twenty years-he did no one thing
nionists, and mre rsnia i es O a t" that was outstanding," was the reply.
omobile associations' . iu ~ bt he was always on the job He
'The importance of tieqb lO 4IIEIL avoided difficulties, and especially
-eeds no eninhasis be;ood tio; hl:' -- dring the great War did a great"
tatement of the statistical coins. it meS .r<~, ; n <;oigarsons knew Of0 deal to bring about co-operation. He
ie,' state the secretary. "Vr:m Ihe ti,^rca,052'r work featured the final hepdtnnier n aesces
4esults of a canvas of local, iirltttn '. ArCftiT]of0 the Michigan Tuberculosis? ful the French commission that was
nd state conditions, the biody ar riv- I " socia^tion yesterday morning at Lane setortohicuny.Ihewe
d at the conclusion that in i192r, not I al flswro given on publicty, a small man he would have been
'ess than 22,600 persons were l 'd.1!,saio.Chst sSelaeci1 jealous, but being capable as 'e is,
7,000 injured, $600,000,0030 o l, . Sfd c ca,nns, and clinics. There were) he brought about co-operation in-
rty damage incurred in t a1ia I !Uso 0;nal ssion;; an these sibjects inISta.
ents. This repre cents an incr&~se z']ih elr-vry worker was allowed to Pofssor Prayer then pointed out
£vvn p aln
f 80 percent within the ias;i, I nognon ani t hat Jusserand was highly regarded
aears. Of the accidents, aboutt 85 l ,, ' (J V lIaof ~ e- y the Amercian Historical associa-
~ent were due to automobile trassue.. c '" ' ,rr "f the organization
"Ths i anatonl lss f o apa - ~ascia~vaa ofthemetin. n teLion, as was testified when he was
"This is ' natotal healthfworkers attend- elected its president in 1921. "This
~ n acaatr" eirdS r I edcc the Michgan-Wiscnsin football was intended as a great compliment,"
Hoover, as to warrant the most com-n- e ProfessorPryrsi."epsdd
plete consideration and effor t "oils ie. t its meeting that I attended, and his
draticreedy" I ~ ,,~, presidential address was well r-
/, O~IW j'Wn TO Til? ceied."
$OOBAL BRNG * ~ At .of C. Today
t nr ~}.+Fa, hr J. hCommand of t. Oraoicl Asn Pogramn
i r , l s h r id c o' r c l u n . oi a t c
noonl U Li I ii ~rvw> lThorns:;' C. p, c. ir . a Ls K5ANSPA ~ER
noon todomy :to& .o .In i
Accident, and re;'itrydis esesi ~j1vjV"aetyRvae.
r Ga rth ienr rr rn :1~stiyIetcldjc:zitate the geat part of vcases' Jon \. h ards will act as chair- Suject "Drama asaScl
whichare hndledat th Univ i tian oi the luncheon program.
ealth ser~vce, accoiring to l11r. X a- The liig, t , c, o' Columbus have Force in a Democracy."
l py XVW Sink, director. "'i(' lN taken a elersihi~pin the Chamlnber,
inn the football sea on," ttst o 01Crrcreceanld thh" non will eOc 3.ry ockk9lul "'d
i reoia sprmain and fractures cve their olicial geeting as -a new
* tAhicli are 'the direct result of ha in emrbe.-
Urort, takes up a great doeal e! the _______________________________________________
~irvice given to tihe tml'nts. i i
etly after Thsnsit::ig mlUu J
o ~f the foatlaall seasonl there ,i, a
libarked decrease in this t .no ct
ises and reapitory den E e . ai! TONIGH'TONLY
me.into the lead in st.uet ;o 1, ijA
(ies." ________ ___________
A slight increase in accide nt ca se . '
'may be attributed to tihe increaise int A IA4"E M D
udent-owned ca rs, accorr; l t0riIR-OM AN 1CE!
J ink. The most common of all:i
rlr gash receivedl in an attemipt lo push
R glass rod through a cork. Tabsi
ften occurs in the fr eshman course7
~n chemistry, according to the dir ec t
Princeton Plans90.1
{} 1"Flour Picturd' 57
twPrinceton, Oct. 27. -- Wodniead.~ .~ jI,
Oct. 29, has been set as the (ltt forI.~ ..//~

F te annual "Flour Picture" at Prince-
ikon university. The, Senior co n, r'
l ~as provided that 'if anything -o _her
k an flour and water is thrown i h
freshmeni, the "picture" will ho < ol-
Have you paid your Daily SIO ~scI-11

Prof. Marcel Clavel off the French
department has completed a work of
compiling characteristic stories of the
principal regions of France, which has I
been published by. Henry Hlolt and
company of New York.
For many years there has beent
growing a so-called "regionalistic"
movement in France, and French lit-I
erature has been recognizing -the fact
that there is an important and varied
national life outside of Paris accord- 1
ing of Professor Clavol. A well
known French critic- has said that
if one would know the regions and3
people of Prance he could obtain this
knowledge through reading somd, of
the literature of these regions. I
Professor Clavel has presented a I
literary geography of France in his
new book entitled, "Terres Et Gens
De France." Seventeen provinces are
represented, and there are two selec-
tions picturing two very different as-
pets, of Paris. The author has at-j
tempted to give an idea of as mnany
of the various phases of French lWe
as possible, anal to demonstrate' that
there is not one typical F enchl and-

scape and one typical Frenchman, but 1
mnany.
The majority of 'the stories' andI
sketches contained in this book have
never been published in America.
'fury aye take-n from writers dating
from George Sand to the present day,
an d arc .:s typical as possible of the
regions which they describe. Not only~
bhe scenei y, 1"It the people and cus-
toirns are poiitrayed.
The appeal to the student has notI
been forgotten in th attempt to find
characteristic selections. Description
is relieved, by narra.tive, and humor-
ouw tale:;.

Qhe t CEV
JSAMPLES
Permanently onl Display at
GUY WOOLFOLK & CO.
*'36 S. State Street
jinn. Arbor, M'ich.
Designed by
WHITEHOUSE & HARDY
BROADWAY AT 40"' SMRET t44 WEST 42 "O5STREET
MEmopoUTAN O+EPA I-IOUs. BDE. KNJCKCFt3SOCKER BUILDiNa
.0 w ci192.l 'NEW YORK

Are being worn by all college men through-
out the eastern states. Before long the
style will be taken up by JVlichiga'n men.
So get your yellow knickers now at

306 South State St.

Playing Afternoon and Evening
Matinee, 2:30 Nights, 7:00-8:3

The Peninsylvaians appear at 3:20, 7:10, 8:50

ERNEST TORRIIII-INCII,

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