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October 18, 1924 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 10-18-1924

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

y

Named Governor
Of Canal Zone

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TO CONENH
Noted Speakers, Including Former
. * .. IT. Head, to Address
Convention
MEETING OPENS OCT. 29
Gathering for what will probably
tie the largest convention ever held
here, church school workers of Michi-
gan will meet for three days begin-
ning October 29 in their regional con-
vention. Although there will be three
other regional councils in Traverse
City, Saginaw, and Kalamazoo, the
executive committee expects that Ann
Arbor will attract the largest gather-
ing.
The program as announced will be
extensive, and will include such
tpeakers as William Oxley Thomp-
son, former president of Ohio State
university. President Marion L. Bur-
ton, in a letter to the conference coin-
iuttee, writes: "President William
Oxley Thompson is a man for whom
American university circles have
justly a very high regard. For 25
yearis he has been the wise and dis-
criminating head of one of our geat-
est state universities, that of the
state of Ohio. His ideals and his
.character have brought him universal
respect, and as a speaker he com-
mands attention on whatever sub-
ject he may choose to pronounce. It
is a privilege at any time to welcome
President Thompson to this con-
miunity."
Others on the program are M. A.
Ilonline, of Pasadena, lecturer on re-
ligious pedagogy; John L. Alexander,
director of the American Youth foun-
dlation of Chicago; Dr' A. M. Locker,
field superintendent of the Interna-
tional Sunday School council; and
Miss Cynthia Maus and Miss Florence
.. Norton, both specialists in the re-
ligious education of adolescents and
smallIchildren.
The project in Ann Arbor has been
endorsed by local clubs, all of which
will be represented at the meetings.
The meetings will be held in the
several churches, with the general
headquarters at the First Baptist
church. Further announcements re-
garding details of meetings and
changes in the program wil be pub-
lished in The Daily.
BELGIAN FELLOWSHIPS
INS TITUTEDI FOR 192
Aimouncements of a number of
gr::duate felowships available for
st udy next year at Belgian universi-
ti"s has just been made by the elu-
cational foundation of the commis-
sion for relief in Belgium. The com-
inisien proposes to use this means
of commeinmorating the wartime work
of Americans there and hopes to pro-
n ote closer international relation-
Oips through the exchange between
the two countries.
Each fellowship for the year 1925-6
c'rries 15,000 francs in addition to
I ation fes, payable in Belgium, and
f lrt class traveling privileges from
te university of the holder to and
f om the university in Belgium. The
flloiwsips which are open to both
Wen and women, to be held for one
year.
Any one of a large number of sub-
jects may be pursued by the holders.
Fellows may choose the Belgian uni-
versity or technical school which
thay'vish to attend.
Si fellowships are to be awarded
by April 1 , 1925. Candidates must be
American' citizens, must have aI
iorugh readting and speaking know-
ledge of French and be graduates of a
recognized American college, capa-
ble of independent research, and with
definite plans for the work to be
undertaken abroad.
Further information and applica-

tion blanks may be obtained by ad-
dressing the Fellowship Committee,
C. R. B. Educational Foundation,
inc., 42 Broadway, New York City.

POFESSORS CARRY ON
SLI ERESEAICH WORK
Iaring the past summer and last
sxn ester Prof. Neil i1. Williams, Prof.
Of} S. Dunffendack, and Dr. William
S. Kimball, all of the physics depart-
ment, have been doing research 'work
in various iields of physics. Professors
miiians and Duffendack were located.
with tHe ,Ceneral Electric company, in
Schenectady, N. Y., and Dr. Kimball
worked in Europe.
Since last June Dr. Kimball has
been studying mathematical physics.
at Cambridge university, England, and
while there made a trip to Germany
to visit Albert Einstein, the noted
physicist and originator of the theory
of relativity, in Berlin. According to
Dr. Kimhn1l, Mr. Einstein is now at
work en the Quantum theory, which
concerns the structure aryl reactions
of atomic matter.
Proe;'ssor Williams conducted re-
search work in connection with re-
cent deveY lopnieni- in the field of radio
in the 1aboratory of the General Elec-
tric company, while Professor Duffen-
back cngaged in spectroscopic work.
I ,ULImt
FOR LECTRICA MEET
Prof. 1. F. Bailey of the electrical
engineering department leaves today
for the semi-annual meeting of the

Electric Power club at White Sul- This club, although small, has been
phur Springs, W. Va. Professor Bailey, responsible almost entirely for the
as chairman, will present the report of standardization of electric motors and
a committee which has been investi, much of the fund of working methods
gating methods of improving alternat-
ing current motors. and knowledge about them.
SMARTLY dressed men in the
style centers of the world know
there is no substitute for a Stetson.
STETSON HATS
S yld fr-Oung menr

GILBERT'S CHOCOLATES

COTY'S

Open

For Business Now

Watch for Formal Opening

Announcement

The Arcade Pharmacy

Col. M. L. Walker is the new gover-
nor of the Panama Canal zone, suc-
ceeding J. J. Morrow, former holder
who resigned. For the last three years
Colonel Walker has been supervisor
of maintenance work in the zone.

7 Nickels Arcade

FIANCEE

KARESS

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Read The Daily

"Classified" Col

Today Only
"ehid the Curtain"

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oil, MINI

Featuring

LUCILLE RICKSEN
And
JOHNNY HARRON

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A Spill on the Cinder Pati

sh ' -.sFba.y -"t.Mr:#.daX t ."7" k. v vt. .!, .

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Track practice and events inevitably pro-
duce many bruises, scratches and cuts. An
application of Mifflin Alkoho. will bring
speedy relief. The alkohol is a splendid
antiseptic; bleeding is stopped almost at
once; the sore spots are cleansed efficiently
and thoroughly; the rapid evaporation of
the alkohol brings soothing, cooling, com-
fort; gentle massage of the bruise provides
quick, pleasant relief.

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Romance Irreim be

YOUR LAST CHANCE TONIGHT

aily rasc
ship or st

See Hii

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the roaringest ruin e
al that ever scuttled
tole a maiden's heart
RAFAEL SADATINPIS
GATAEST ROhiANCEL
Mied t
sh
Uto
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The boldest, wickedest, merri-
est pirate that ever spat in a
galley ditch--who roved the
seas for booty, kidnaped fair
darsel and lolled in Moorish
T T a . .1:--the roaringest u;

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I

And Miff in Alkohol has a
dozen other daily uses, too

After bathing, a Mifflin rub-down is cool-
ing and invigorating.
After exercise, Mifflin Alkohol relieves
tired muscles and many "sore-spots."
Mifflin Alkohol is denatured by a formula
which actually improves it for external use
College teams and many other athletic
organizations use Mifflin Alkohol regu-
larly. Be sure YOU get MIFFLIN-in the
handy-grip one-pint bottles as ill xstrO ted.

They cha
an Engl i
gentlemn
the gall(
sw ephea,

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H ose }on get here now are the'correct version
of what is new and most expressive for Fall.
Colors are more vivid-patterns are more
pleasing to the eve-and there are plenty of
selections for men of varying tastes. Come in
-see our latest patterns.

Perforrnances
Start at
2:00-340
7:00-8:40
POPULAR
PRICES,

Featuring
MILTON SILLS
ENID BENNETT
WALLACE BEERY
and 3,000 Others

I

COMING SUNDAY

Waldo Griener, '25E, president o;
the local chapter of Tau Beta Pi, na-j
tional honorary engineering fratern-1
ity, together with Prof. A. D. Moore of
the electrical engineering department
and John W. Ross, '23E, have left for
the annual convention of the fratern-
ity in Ames, Iowa.
Thus far 200 receipts for senior
pictures have been sold by the _MiJ(i-
ganensian. All seniors wishing to have
their pictures in the annual must pur-
chase their receipts before Thanks-
giving day, November 27.
Local Subscriptions $3.50-payablc

311 STATE STREET
HJA ;fRDASIhES TO MICHIGAN MEN

Mifflin Chemical Corporation
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
SJeis dgents: HAROLD F. RITCHIE ,CO., Inc.
171 Madison Ave., New York
Toronto Sydney Wellington
M IF.FkLIN
ALISOHOL
thc external tonic
AT ALL GOOD DRUG STORES

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MIFFLIN
ALKON(

.AOOLPI4 ZVKOR.-JSI$ L.LASICY M3EXT
t 'NOM A5 . \\ ul!V/,,JAMES OLIVER
CIGIJAwor
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