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October 17, 1924 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 10-17-1924

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Mi 1 an 473 a i
ed evesry mornin except Monday
liei'ivrstyyear by the Board in
of Student 1'ublications.
.rs of Western Conference Editorial
oil.
Associated Press is exclusively len-
the use for republication of all news
s credited to it or not otherwise
in this paper and the local news pub-
iercin,
,d at the postoffice at Ann .Arbor.
, as second class matter. Special rate
-e granted by Third Assistant Post-
Cen 'ral.
ipt ion by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
eet.
s : Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; busi-

MERELY SLUSH
Expenditures of the three major
parties in the presidential campaign
will be thoroughly investigated, be-
ginning today, by a Senate commit-
tee headed by Senator Borah, meeting
in Chicago. The primary object of the
meeting it is understool is to investi-
gate the charges of Senator LaFollette
that the Republican party is raising a
"slush fund" of huge proportions for
use in states of which they are doubt-
ful.

be aware of the consequences of this
law.
We Americans are supposed to tol-
erate the religious beliefs of others.
And to those who believe that religion
is an inherent principle of education,
that it cannot be handed out in so
many hunks to children "over the
week-end," this amendment, if passed,
will be an intolerable infringement
on their rights.
R. 0. and G. G.

i'

I

MUS

AND
DRAMA

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II

EDITORIAL STAFF,
Telephones 2414 and 176
MANAGING EDITOR
PHILIP M. WAGNER
ditor............... John G. Garlinghouse
ews Editor............Robert G. Ramsay
Night Editors
eorge W. Davis Joseph Kruger
[homas P. Henry "John Conrad
Kenneth C. Keller Norman R. Thai
Sports Editor........William H. Stonean
iunday$ Editor......obe S. Mansfield
omen's Editor. .... erena Moran
t uic and 1)rana . Robert B. Henderson
relegraph' Editor. ...William J. Walthour
Assistants
.ouse Barley Winfeld 11. Line
daron, Barlow arold A. Moore
L.eslie s. Bennts Carl E. Ohmacher
%rma Bikell Wiliam C. Patterson
1erman Boxer. Helen S. Ramsay
iith Cady Jr. Regina Reichann
iillard B. Crosby Marie Reed
Valentine L. Daves Edmarie Schrauder
aestW. !ernamberg Frederick R. Shillito
Foseph Q. Gartner Fredk. K. Sparrow, Jr.
ni ouseworth C. Arthur Stevens
Mfi abeth S. Kennedy Marjory Sweet
Elizabeth Liebermann Frederic Telmos
Vrancis R. Line Herman J. Wise
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 1609
BUSINESS MANAGER
WM. D. ROESSER
Advetising.. ...... .E.. L. Dunne
Advertising. ..... ....-J. 3. Finn
Advertising. ..---.....1. A. Marks
Advaetis ng ........ ....Al. Rockwell
Acouts..........Byron Parker
Sirculation................... Winter
Publication..........John W. Conlin
Assistants
W.,V Arnold W. L. Mullins
A F. Ardssi X.. Mast
Gordon Burris 1. L. Newmann
F. Dentz Thomas Olmstead
Philip Dleitz J. D. Ryan
tavid Fox N. Rocnzweg
Dorman Freehling Margaret Sandburg
W. E. Hamaker F. K. Schoenfeld
V. Johinson S. 11. Sinclair
L 1. Kramer F. Taylor
Louis W. Kramer
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1924
Night Editor-KENNETH C. KELLAR
THE SECOND GUN
Discussion of the academic require-
ments for appointment and the pro-
motion of members of the faculty oc-
cupied the time of the Deans in their
regular meeting with the President
Thursday morning. Whether or not
this had any bearing on the volume
of miscellaneous appointments last
year which aroused so much indig-
nation among older members of the
faculty is' hard to say. It is to be
hoped that the discussion was an in--
dication of future policy, that it is the
"second gun" in President Burton's
-amp aign for a higher type of edu-
cator.
The securing of this higher type
will necessitate three phases of ac-
tivity on the part of the administra-
lion: first the salaries of the dis-
tLinguished members of the faculty
nust be increased so as to be pro-
portionate with the value of their
cervices; second, more men of dis-
.inct scholarly achievements must be
added to the personnel of the teach-
ng staff; and last and probably most
mportant, the title of professor at
he University of Michigan must repre-
sent something definite, must be giv-
)nly when the candidate shall have
roved himself worthy of the distin-

Whether or not there is any sensa-
tional expose the investigation is
worthwhile since it will keep before,
the politicians of the country the
feelings of many people concerning
the use of unnecessarily large amounts
of money to spread their propoganda.J
A repetition of such affairs as the
Newberry scandal of a few years ago
will be avoided.
In all of the excitement there is an
element of humor. Each party with
much seriousness accuses the other
of corrupt practices only to be met
with a similar accusation. Senator La-
Follette had hardly finished his
"slush fund" talk when Thomas V.
O'Connor, chairman of the shipping
board and head of the Longshoreman's
union for many years, made the
equally astonishing statement that a
large amount of money has been sent
from Russia through Mexico to streng-
then the cause of the Independent
candidates. There probably is little or
no truth in either allegation-they
?.re simply a part of the mud-slinging
tactics which have come to character-
ize American politics in the past few
years.
Senator Borah's committee from the
Senate will in all probability do little
but investigate. There can be little
expectation that the receipts and ex-
penditures of any party have run be-
yond the limit usually set in such
campaigns. Even if they have, it will
be difficult to detect. The meeting and
investigation must be principally of
worth to the nation in as much as it
will curb the various candidates' pro-
pensity for poorly founded statements,
slandering the opposition-
A good slogan for Illinois motorers,
"The longest way 'round the towns-
is the cheapest way home.
Where did Ypsi get the idea that
Michigan men wanted to come to their
dances, anyhow?
BEAT ILLINOIS
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will he
disregarded. The names of conmmuni-
cants will, however, he regarded as
coniden ial u>on request.
REPLY TO AN AGGRIEVED
ALUMNUS
To the Editor:
I have before me an open communi-
cation from an aggrieved alumnus. I
trustthatt miyreply is of less length
and more to the point. It appears, dis-
regarding family history, that he
failed to procure tickets to the Wis-
consin game, not only for himself but
for his friends. Considering that he is
a graduate of two great universities,
it might be assumed that he would
have sufficient intelligence to ask
for the least number of tickets he
could comfortably get away with, in-
stead of supplying all his friends.
The basic weakness in his argu-
ment appears to lie in failure to as-
certain the facts. His allegation, that
only 500 seats had been reserved for
the Wisconsin game has no basis. Our
agrrieved alumnus might be interest-
ed in the facts. There were available
42,642 seats. Of this number 17,909
were allotted to Michigan alumni; 17,
909 to the students; 2,323 to the
President's party, players, M club, and
in complimentary tickets, 2,000 to the
faculty; 2,500 were assigned to Wis-
consin in accordance with their of-
ficial request of July 16, 1924. Wis-
consin disposed of 2,000 tickets to
their alumni leaving only 500 for the
student body. On September 22 they
requested 1,000 more tickets. This re-
quest came 18 days after the alumni
allotment had been sold out at Ann I

Arbor. Had Wisconsin asked and as-
sured Michigan of the need for 10,000
tickets, I do not doubt that their re-
quest would have been granted.
The aggrieved alumnus having fail-j
ed to secure tickets through the pro-
per channels, tried all the "back-
doors." Enraged by his complete fail-
ure lie wrote an abusive letter con-
demning us to eternal perdition, ap-
parently in the hope of easing his
injured feelings. Thereby showing his
ability to "confuse reiteration and
abuse, with argument and proof."
--Charles Lewis, '27E.
X-RAY THE AMENDMENT
In the article, "The Little Red
School House" printed in The Michi-
gan Daily of October 16th, a plea
was put to the voters to consider care-
fully the school amendment this fall.
The plea, by coincidence, was appro-
priately followed by two lines at the

EA D ROLLS
SAKR.EL-B .R
Underneath this paragraph a ratherr
incoherent communique will be found,J
which if you can understand you are
a better man than we. It is the workt
of a Fella on the sport staff, and hec
says it is a sort of an advance noticed
on a .,really hot sports feature that
will appear in the Sunday Daily. Butc
finish the story yourself, as the edi-
tors say. ...
* * *
Dere Cowles: As 1 man of letterst
to another, the writer is asking youz
do you not agree with him that to have a
mug intimate their stuff is enough to
drive a man into a state of detraction. d
And having some 1 like Nick Al-1
trock, the Washington (D. C:) jugler
of wds. copy their line is far worse
than having to lap up a vile of poison
and into the bargain he adds that he
is the 4 most baseball strategy witch,l
as you know, he is not as the writer
is. On acct. I am not forced to except
such treatment from a baby who of
course is far my interior, I am asking
you, as a bro. of the quill to read
over my missile in the 2nd Sector of
Next Sundays paper and let me knowa
if you do not agree that Altrock is
horse de ouvre. If you do not, it is
all 0. K. with the writer as he is a
man in class by hisself as a writer and
your opinion would not matter a he-1l
of a lot with me. Please consider this
strickly confidential.
Elsworth Maihaffy.
About two weeks ago we composed
a book-review for Caligula, who is
running the literary page in the Sun-
day second section. The book was
one on How to Win At Ma Jong-a
tgame of which we know nothing, and1
which we have long detested. The re-
view was to be considered as a tre-
kAmendous personal favor to Caligula,
and in return for it he was to knock
off a contribution for this department.
That was two weeks ago. Since then
we have seen Caligula on the average

AND NEXT WEDNESDAY
The Players Club will start its new
season October 22, in Sarah Caswell
Angell Hall at eight o'clock, or there-
abouts-for nothing seems to start
on time in that place-with a produc-
tion of Shaw's "How He Lied To Her
Husband" and Ben Hecht's "The Hero
of Santa Maria."
The cast for "The Hero of Santa
Maria" will include John Cook as
Maty Fisher, Earl Fingerle as Toady.
Geraldine Uris as Elmira Fisher, Mon-
roe Lippman as the Uncle, and Harry1
Johnson, V. Doll, Lelia Ward, and
Alice Vliet as the townspeople, some-
times called the mob more or less
off-stage.
In the Shaw comedy, that perfect,
devastating satire on Mr. Shaw, the
sex triangle, and she-devil imitations
of Candida, F. F. Silver will play Mr.
Bompas, Irvin Zeman will be Henry
Apjohn-eighteen ,and virgin-and;
Mina Miller, who was so excellent in
the Comedy Club program Wednesday
night, will have the role of Mrs.
Aurora Bompas with her galloping
case of Vogue-itis.
Special attention is being given to
the settings, now under construction
by the Player's Workshop. The one,
a fashionable London drawing-room,
will be formed of two decorative col-
umns, orange, silver, black and blue,
on either side of the stage with a
lone mahagony writing desk in the
center, and the whole masked by non-
committal black curtains.
The other scene, a small-town Elm
Street parlor, will be piled with every
kind of bourgeois clutter-horse-hair
chairs, wax flowers, still-life pictures
of dead fowl and fish, a hanging kero-
sene lamp, a towering what-not-and
filled on either side with two impos-
sible wall-paper flats.
* * *
A BLUE-MADE AGONY
There is coming next week to De-~
troit, at the New-Detroit, a musical
comedy better, very probably, than
anything of its kind you have seen
before: the negro revue, "RuMnnin'
Wild."
Last year I was lucky enough to
see the production at a midnight per-
formance in New York city-such a
recommendation, to mean anything,
must be personal-and with all solemn-
nity the performance was marvellous,
nothing less than sublime. In com-
parison with such rivals as the supid,
boring Ziegfield Follies, or the even
duller Scandals, "Runnin'Wild" is so
far superior as to be ridiculous.
Its virtue lies in its spontaneous
speed: it fairly makes one dizzy; there
are some dozen honestly clever come-
dians, the singing is pure, intoxicating
jazz, and the dancing makes everyone
burst unconsciously into applause. No
one, very truly, can kick and clog, yell
and sob as a negro, once he is fully
drunk with his own inborn love of
rhythm.
In New York it ran for' months--
with a reason: some may dislike clap-
trap, leaden musical "shows," but no
one can be immune to the irresistible,
primitive sophistry that splashes
through this negroid can-can.
* * *
WHAT'S WRONG WITH THIS
PICTURE!
The audience as it respectively as-
sembled at the Comedy Club plays
was a little more than startled,
shocked rather, to find that all the
seats, hard as they were, had been
removed in favor of that terrific type
of camp stool they use at funerals
and Women's Club card-and-MahJong
parties.
In all justice this audience should
be told purpose of such an uncomfort-
able step. Guess, if you can: it was
in order that the ATHLETIC DANC-

ING classes might have fuller
quarters.. . .?
The situation is really unthinkable;
it is not only next to impossible to

BOOKS and SUPPLIES for all
Colleges at GRAHAM'S, (at
both ends of the diagonal walk)

I.

.....r.

r _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ ______ ____ _ _ _

S
5
12
19
26

0 TOBE R,
M T W
1
9 7 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
27 28 29

... . II..-_ _

1924
T F
2 3
9 10
16 17
23 24
30 31

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4
11
18
25

Notice
We clean and reblock hats and caps
and do it RIGH T. You will appreciate
having your hat done over in a cleanf
and sanitary manner, free from odor
and made to fit your head.
FACTORY HAT STORE
l7 Paeard St. Phone 1791i
(Where D. U. R. Stops at State)
IUXETE LEG
CLOTHES FOR THE COLLEGE MAN

GO TO URBANA
DANCE
A
GRANGER'S
TONIGHT AND
SATURDAY NiGHT
BILL WATVIIINS AND 1115 C ANGERI E~I-HT

... , .--..-_-.---__ __ __

I UVINv tAReOL 0.,D eS ',
IChiropodist Orthopedst
N. University Ave. Phone 2 6 151

'V

SLEEP ANYWHERE, BuT
EAT AT REX'S
T1 C CLUB LUNCH
712 Arro St- fet
1M r State and Packard Sts

I -

You'llLike These Clothes

_- --

The FLY-FRONT COAT
BROAD shouldered, easy
hanging-their conservatism
proclaims their smartness.
Cut in lightweight and winter
weight woolens inpatterns
approved by college men.
$3450 to $4950
NAT LUXENBERG & BROS.
841 BROADWAY, NEW YORK
Nxt Shsniei at CAMPUS rCOTERY
04 S. State St.,.November 20 and 21
Our style memo. book sent free on request

t );
r4
E k 4
". f

- because they combine the
same fine hand tailoring, up-to-
the-minute style, new colors and
fabrics usually found only in
clothes created by the highest
priced tailors. Yet they are
priced only $55 to $75-some
as low as $45.
Come in and get acquainted with
this unusual store and the unusually
fine clothes it sells. -
Illustrated is a new University Model,
with the popular straight boxy"-lines.
$55
Suits . . . . $45 to $75
Overcoats . . . $50 to $85
Dinner Suits. . $67.50 to $80
Herman, Mandis & Bogin Co.
Entire Fifth Floor-28 E. Jackson Boulevard
Corner Jackson and Wabash -- CHICAGO

1

of once
dunned

a day, and have repeatedly
him for a Sample of hisI

Work with the Typewriter. It was to
be six inches long. He always Changed
the Subject.
And yesterday he crashed in with
this. If he thinks it's six inches long
he's crazy:
AUTOMNIALE
In Fall of year in Avalon
The leaves fell off the trees
And made axminster on the ground
Or color on the breeze.
In Fall of year in Broceliande
The leafage likewise fell-
Made faery craft upon the pond
And flaunted Autumn's knell.
In Fall of year at Michigan
Leaves flutter sere or gay,
But B and G boys rake them up
And cart the Fall away.
Arnould, Duke of Winterbottom. I
Y A B L E ,
Once upon a time there was a very
beautiful co-educational girl who lived
on the campus of this great University.
She was very popular.

The fir:st two aspects of the situa-
on are dependent on the benificence
the legislature. They must consent
remove the mill tax limit before
ichigan can hope to expand in this
rection. President Burton will do his
nost in an oratorical way, and will
tert his best efforts for the passage
his measure. The students, on the
her hand, must convince their
)me-town people that the University
worthy of the enormous expenditure
tailed by the state.
But even if we infer the ultimate
.ccess of the financial part of the
mpaign, there remains the last, a
ill more important feature. No
nount of money will raise the type
educator if there is not present
re that professional spirit, that
holarly atmosphere which can be
stered only through careful distinc-
an as to rank. The nation's greatest
holars will hardly care to add their
me to a list of professors which in-
ides men. fine in every way no
ubt, but who have never made any
al contribution in the field of let-
rs. Included in last year's appoint-
mts were faculty members who
ye made little local reputation and
ho have attained to no national
ominence as educators or scholars.
.ch carelessness must be avoided in
ture promotions.
The fact that the Deans discussed
system of requirements, then, is an

I

Now this girl took a course in Rus- have more than a single rehearsal in
sian literature because, of course, of the hall for a production, but every
the cultural advantages she expected Wednesday night, the unanimous dra-
from it. (This, my children, is a very matic evening, there' is a lecture to
praiseworthy ambition and; I hope j freshman girls from seven to ,eight
you will do the same thing.) o'clock!
However this girl did not study hard There is nothing to be said, and
and never got her lessons. j evidently less to be done; more and
more, the situation becomes almost
So when the blue book camne around,

she did not know how to answer a
question on "Crime and Punishment,"
which you remember was written by
Dostoevsky.
She answered it with, "This course
is a crime and Dostoevsky is its pun-
ishment."
"Ha ha," she said, "the professor
will give me a 'C' because of my wit.'
But she got an "E."
Moral: A BIRD IN THE HAND
SAVES NINE IN THE BUSH.
BEEZLEBUB.
* * *

funny.

(short and sweet, ha ha) and then
turn to your left and there it is.
There is a chess set down there-
a very elegant one, too-and some
books (one by Karl Marx)-and a lot
of ashtrays. The management is con-
sidering having, the walls decorated
by a Prominent Local Boy.
To introduce the place, they are
giving away apples.
If anyone has found a pocket-book
containing a Sum of Money, I would

I

!I

This afternoon we had the pleasure

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