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January 27, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-01-27

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I

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IaiI

Secti(

No, 92

TWENTY PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1924

TWENTY PAGES

PRICE, FIV

. ....

.

_.._
.;..,

I,

4OMENi

The Week's News
In Brief
The following column is a sum-
mary of the news of the world
during the past week. An attempt
has been made to present the most
important happenings as briefly
and concisely as possible.
NATIONAL

CNOiFER ENCE SAID TO BE ONE OF
MOST SUCCESSFUL IN
HISTORY

College Athletic
Results

IEF CREWS SUMMONED TO
D IN RESCUING OF TRAPP.
ED LABORERS
TEMPTS TO SIGNAL
VORKERS OF NO AVAIL
rts State That Both Entrances'
Hlave Beeni Closed;i~son
Gasses Found
anktown, Pa. Jan. 26.-(By AP)-
xplosion in the Lanchester mine
e Barnes and Tucker coal comp-
here late today entombed a party
iners. The number of men at
when the explosion occurred
not been determined at five
k but, the figure was put by men
he grounds at 40. Superintend-
-amilton summoned a rescue
from the.Bethlehem steel com-;
s mine at Heilwood.
w's of the explosion spread rapid-!
rough the village, and in a few
tes a crowd of men, women and
ren stood shivering in the zero
erature near the mouth of the

West Point.-Tie University of To-
ronto today' won four out of seven
wrestling bouts from the Army, but
lost a boxing tournament to the ca-
dets, 19 points to 8.
Princeton.-The Princeton univer-
sity wrestling team defeated the Uni-
versityof Pennsylvania today, 16 tc
9.
Annapolis, Md.-Navy defeated the
Lehigh wrestling team four out of 'th
sevep -bouts for a point score of 14'
to 11 here today.
New Haven.-The Yale polo team
defeated the 103rd Field Artillery team
of Providehce 13 to 5 here this af

MELLON PROVISION
FOR SPLIT INCOME
RETURNS RJCE
ADOPTION OF PLAN WOULD HAVt
NETTED EIGHT MILLIONS
YEARLY
DEMOCRATS MAY MAKE
COMPROMISE O N BILL
Dispose of Portion of Community
Property Tax Section
During Day

The rum-running treaty between BURTON SOUNDS NOTE
Great Britain and the United States
was finally signed after all of tht OF IDEAL EDUCATION
British Dominions had approved it -
The treaty provides that all British i Head of Lewis Institute A pphs
ships within an hour's steaming dis- ideas of University Head
tance of one of our ports may bE 1TF.0 Own Field
searched for contraband liquor, and
that in return British ships may carry Drawing to a close what delegates
liquor under seal into our ports and conceded to be one of the most su-.
ohut again. cocddt1eon ftems
* * cessful conferences to discuss engn-
' I Bering 'education in its hiigher aspects,
The Senate launched upon its great- i
.est inquiry orgy in history. No less President Marion L. Burton, in the
than eight separate investigations principal address of a dinner lastj
were started this week. night delivered a talk in which he'
sounded the keynote of ideal educa-
Charges of corruption in the Teapot tion. The dinner, tendered the vis-
Dome oil leases, which involve for- iting delegates by the .Utiiiersitj,
mer Secretary Fall and other govern- brought together deans representing
ment officials -are beginning to worry more than fifty American and Canad-
the Republican party. ian engineering colleges.;
* * * President Burton. in his talk dealth

i
I

te noon. Washington, Jan. 26.-(By AP)-
S-The house ways and means committee
New York.'---Robert McAllister, "thE advanced a step nearer to the income
flying cop" tonight established t r
world's record of 11 seconds flat foi ta rates of the Revenue bill today
100 rnetets indoor in the first event o with the d'sposition in part of the
that distance on a board track everf coinmunity property tax section of the
held. - pending measure but groups of Re-r
publicans failed at meetings to unite
Ithica, N. Y.-Basketball: Cornell their forces for the impending in-
;5, Princeton 24. come rates fight.
Secretary Mellon's recommend-
na . - sketball:.idshi ation to proh 'it husbands and wives
na 44, -eog w 1dividing family incomes for prpose
__en 44, __otown 12. of filing separate tax returns as al-
lowed in eight states was rejected.
Another vote, will be taken Monday
on a proposal of chairman Breen tc
prohibit such evasions of incomes
A-hen ,received alone from wages andi
salaries. Secretary Mellonestima.ted
DEadoption of this section would net
OtIM.P19-Ueight million. dollars additional r~ev-
enue.
ier"icans (,~n Honort i hvingh the Republicans will un-

The Day's News At
The Capitol
E. L. Dohney offered to cancel con-
ditionally his lease of the Naval re-
serve in California.
The Senate Teapot Dome commit-
tee heard further testimony from Ar-
chie Roosevelt and G. D. Wahlberg.
President Coolidge ordered an en-
quiry by the interior department in-
to-the wisdom of the oil leasing /pol-
icy of former secretary Fall.
The house military committee re-
quested Henry Ford to appear at its
hearings on Muscle Shoals next week.
The House ways and means com-
nuittee voted down* the Mellon pro-
posal for husbands and wives to be
prohibited from divid'ng family in-
come for purposes of filing separate
tax returns.
The senate agriculture committee
discussed amendments to the Nor-
Beck-turtness crop diversification
bill and heard Secretary Wallace en-
dorse the McNary-Haugen bill to
create an agricultural export cor-
poration.
KEESBEING DWVEN
FROM PETROLEUM 1IEL00
Washington, Jan. 26.-(By AP)--
The federal campaign to drive rebels
out of the petroleum fields is meet-
ing with marked success, the Mexi-,
can embassy said in a statement to-
night.
"The highly important fields of Oz-
uluama, Zacamixtle, and Cerro Azul
have been retaken," the statement
declared, "and are now patrolled by
government forces. The advance is
continuing.
"General Estrada's rebel army has
retreated into the interior of the
state of Michoacan and a decisive
battle is expected near Morelia.
Individual Acts
Wanted For Fair.

VARSITY CONQU
GOPHERS IN 61
COMEBA1CK 3
OFFENSIVE PLAYING OF I
FEATURES ATTACK
INVADERS
TH R EEGOALS IN FI1
MINUTES BRING VIC
Good Teanmplay and Fight
Big Factors in Pulling
From Fire
Fighting desperately in the
minutes of play for a game
apparently beyond their rea
igan's plucky basketball fiv
ed victory from the clutche
clever Gopher quintet by
point last night in the Yost fie
the battle ending 32-31.
With the action slow at
of the game, both teams exh
ever-increasing burst of spe(
culminated only in the closing
of the contest, when both tee
fighting furiously, man for
the lead, and the crowd w
'feet, shouting frantically fo&
Behind With Six 31iinmte
With the score 31-26 in fav
invaders, Captain Olsen ca
out. Six minutes remained b
final whistle would blow and
verine players gathered tog
determine the strategy th
bring them to the fore. 'T
utes of fierce playing ensi
both teams missing wild ati
score and Captain Olsen aga
for time, another strategy se
lowing.
Resuming of play found- ph
spectators in a frenzy of ex
A Gopher caught the ball on
and dribbled toward the bas
ing his guard for a shot.
twisted on the rim and dro
and Michigan gained possessi
ball. Cherry received the 1
pass and started for the ba.
passed to Kipke, who passe
the red-topped guard at the

m were wives and child-
s believed to be in the,

mine is one of a group of half
zen in this field which is in
na county, 12 miles from Indiana.
a drift mine, and first reports
that both entrances had been

x Rescued
five o'clock a rescue
way along the main'
he sixth heading came
ozen men, some of
inconscious from the
xplosion. They were
>pen air and given first

Representative Blanton, Texas, the
bad-boy of the House, declared that he
would oppose an annuity of $5,000 for
Mrs Harding, claiming that she al-
ready had enough money.
* *
A mail-order bootlegger who plan-
ned to flood the country with poison-
ous liquor .was unearthed in Phila-I
delphia. One of the main ingredients
of his mail-order booze was creasotei
a material used in weatherproofing
telephone poles.
,* * *
The State department announced=
that it might be forced to adopt "ap-
propriate measures to protect its com-
merce and its nationals from the grave
and imminent danger involved" in the f
threatened blockade of Tampico by
Mexican rebels. The rebels decided tc
lift the blockade.
An average of $68.37 for every man
woman, and child in the United States

with the problems facing educators
in the institutions of higher learning
today. "The youth of America is in
a dilemma today that must be con-
sidered from two angles," said Presi-
dent Burton. "From the subjective
standpoint, there is not the latent
granite in the young people that char-
acterized those of a generation back.
It seems there is a constant growth
of disrespect. If others do a thing;
they seem to feel it their duty to fol-
low; they are concerned with popular-
ity, with being popular an do not
seem to think truths." Bringing his
charges to college life in a closer re-
lation, President Burton continlued.
'College life is simply a reflection of
the life of a great part of huniasity,
only on the campuses of the univer-
sities actual life is exaggerated. But!
such conditions are not entirely the
fault of the youth."
Success- Matter of -Personality'
"The opinion of the neat generation
of the ideal great man is the financier .
the executive, the magnate. It s"Mo j
that success is selling yourself
through-your personeliy 8tudeit

Emblem irst1
S-Raised
FINJFAXENORWAY, UNlTED
STATES FIRST IN ORDiER

ite on a party bill in committee orE
make new overtures to the DemociratE
for a compromise on the Mellon bill
was the subject of discussion.
uirui ru nnuimp i AT

' Chamonix, France, Jan. 26-(11y A VI LL I ULklILIU. LIW 11
P.)-The Men from the north led the<
nations of the world in point scored ! TAU O NRESTSRIES
at the end, of the first day's competi-:
tions in the winter Olympic games but Prof. R. M. Wenley of the philos-I
the stout hearted American skaters ophy department delivered the last of
bold, -the honor of having their flag I a series of three lectures on present
as the first national emblem flying at unrest at the Detroit Synagogue last
Syweek.
Sthe top of the Olympic mast. IUnder democratic government the
Th insadNrwegians prfved .party ystem- has been the weak ajjot..

aid workers reported
cued miners were suf-i
effects of poison gas,
placed in automobiles
he Dicksonville hospi-
from the mine.
>f one of the rescuet
to mine officials that
al to the entombed
of an air pipe were{

Jan. 16.-Hope for the lives of some
) miners, entombed late today by anI
xplosion in the Lancashire mine of
he Barnes and Tucker Coal company
ere. was practically giveni up to-a
ight when rescue workers reported
Iat the wrecked mine was dense with'
black damp" and that the water was
ising rapidly in the underground pas-
ageways.
The fan house of the mine was
'recked by the terrific blast and the
an was put out of commission. Poi-
on gas, water, lack of fresh air and
heavy fall of rock impeded the pro-,
ress of volunteer rescue worker;-
-ho dug valiantly in an effort tc
each the entombed men.
fancy Dress To
Feature Annual
Architect Ball
Inaugurating what is expected toI
e an interesting campus event, the
924 annual architects' party, to be
eld Friday, May 16, is to take the
orm of a "Ball Fantastique". Those
'ho desire admission must come
lothed in other than ordinary raim-

in 1922. are not concerned primarily with suprer ein the distance 'skating, but according to Professor Wenley. Cer-
what is right or wrong, but with the the nAmericans, on ice as on the cin. tain extremists assert that it makes
The Supreme court refused to re- possibility of being caught." der path, demonstrated that they were no difference which party is in pow-
consider the impeachment of former "Inner life is the highest form of te r, the whole question being merelyf
Governor Walton, of Oklahoma, saying higher learning. If America is tc unbeatable in sprints- one of loaves and fishes. He said that
that it was a purely political matter keep her promise to. the world, we Charles Jewtraw of Lake Placid, N this view is inadmissable, but if it be l
and not within its jurisdiction have to have men who can think, can Y., the international champion, woni true in any measure, our political
* * * judge. The primary need is to heir I the 500 meter event, covering the dis- conditions are little better than those
the people want what they ought tc tance in 44 seconds. Olsen, of Nor- now prevalent in such a country a:
Ku Klux Klan members accused Mr have. In England, the college stu- way, captured second place, and China.£
McAdoo of incorporating the rosaryh dt ps a boy y tea man men-Thumberg,.of -Finland and Larson of
and other catholic emblems into a ser- tall In ri th ite is the Norway, divided third honors.
ters of dollar bills printed during hir case. There must be persistent effort Julius Skutnabb, : also of Finland Junior Girls To
term as Secretary of the Treasury on intellectual things toward schol- took second place, covering the dis- Ac 18 22
Heproved that the bills had been de-Inntll arly things and in the presence of the tance in .8 minutes, 48 seconds in his
signed in 1863 while Lincoln was pres- best, youth- will respond." featNwiwh Vallent de W ialif, America ----
* * *. Lewis Institute President Speaks Larsen, of Norway, was third. The "Thank You, Madame," is the title
Following the talk of President) score by points as given out at th of the 20th annual Junior Girls' playl
Another sale of surplus war mater- Burton, Mr. M. W. Alexander of thI end of the contest was: which the class of 1925 will present
al to the Obregon government was National Industrial conference boara Finland, 20 1-2; Norway 17 1-2; March 18-22 at the Whitney theatre
completed between the Mexican em- and Dr. Herbert Lewis president of United States 11; Sweden 1.- l4ouise Barley and Josephine Stearns
bassy and officials at Washington. Lewis Institute and author of "WhIte ~^~~~~ -are the authors.1
* * * Iihnn hr The opening night this year- will b
***Lightning" .gave short speeches apply- H D*"""" *''' erwl '
gaeSpechsappy-'Theld on Tuesday, March 18. instead I
The United States- officially recog- ing the thoughts of President BurtonT,
nized the Obregon government in Mex- to their respective fields.' Unique Novelties of Wednesday as has been the custom;
Ico, despite disturbing conditions in 1 At the session held today, the place -formerly. Following tradition, how-
that country at present. of research in engineering schools andever, the first performance will be giv-
t athe report of the board of investiga- Brilliant lighting effects, gaudy dec- en in honor of the senior women. The
t r * tihereor cofteawr o ng th oratiori novelties and snowballs show- remaining performances will be open'
The State department brought for- t ion and cooperation wvere among the , rduo h eeliswl ela to thegerapulccodigtth
ward documentary evidence to prove deliberations. No definite policies were eed upon the revellers will be fea- tom general public according to the
the essential unity of three factors in set up but the concensus of opinion negpefTheorJtwbsns are atiele eo
Russia-the Soviet, the Communist iareached after discussion of topics wil Fb. ehe snoballswi rrformances are sehdule
party, and the Third International and be a help in determining future ed- hper and in one dance during the ev- for Saturday, March 22.
to show the relation of the activitie :!ucation for engineers, it was stated b e thondth ofdthem will
of these groups to certain organiza- ; delegates. S. Cuo.hedner.Teywh ~ 'A. Execuitive .[en Fleet
tions in the United States." *aid in carrying out the effect in the President Marion L. Burton, Prof.
*arctic scene that will be re-created in L. A. Hopkins of the engineering col-

and dropped through the
Circus acts and individual perform- making the score 31-28.
ers are- needed for 'the Union fair that Final Rally ins
will be held in Yost field house March Doyle tipped the ball to K
-and 8. Any students who would the next toss-up, and the ste
fense man dribbled down the
care to take part in the performance the court, with Pesek tagging
without taking a regular booth may stopped near the corner -and
do so by calling William Kratz, '24E the ball for a clear basket, 1
who has charge of this part of the af- Michigan to within one point
fair. leaders. The ball was brought
Fraternities who plan to take booths ter and again Kipke received
at the Fair should see Charles Liv- I tap. Michigan found Minneso
ingston, '25, before Feb. 12. It is nec- fense impregnable at this 'po
essary that all booths be assigned im- passed the ball beyond the cE
mediately in order to insure adequate the court in a supreme effort t
preparation for the fair. Fraternities Ithrough for a shot. With fc
who decide on the same act will not seconds remaining, George Hi
both be allowed to take the act, but whose five sensational basket!
the one applying first will be given closing half kept the Maize a:
the concession- in the running, grabbed the b,
A tight rope walker is also needed Deng, dribbled to the center ci
One student who is a former profes- heaved the oval. The ball t
sional performer in tight rope walking high, hit the backboard, and
has already volunteered- but the serv-, the net for the winning goal.
ices of another are desired. Tp1 i 'frhting five

rave
swis
gfes

Students Enter Fishery College
Seattle. Wash., Jan. 26.-Thirty-six
students attached to the University
of Washington are enrolled' in what
is believed to be the only college of
fisheries outside of Japan.
For first-hand study of the pro-
pagation. capture, handling and mar-
keting of fish, the fisheiies college
of taiiivora itLILf Wn4cin crt5 U ha I'

nittee on student af-
board of censors for
e to give their san-
imes before permitt-
art in the party.
were also announc-
lctipg of a competi-
ns of the decoration.
is to be open to all

Porto Rico petitioned Congress for
modification of her organic law tc
permit more self-governmentj
* * *
A new method of execution which 3
if proved successful, will be extensive-
ly adopted, was tiied out on twc
-Chinamen convicted of murder in Ne-
vada. They were subjected, in a clos-
ed chamber, to a flood of cyanogen, a
gas which kills in 10 seconds, having
the odor of bitter almonds.
FOREIGN
Vladimir Illtch Uianoff, better
known as Nikolai Lenine, died after a
prolonged illness. He was the organ-
izer and chief exponent of the move-
ment which became known as Bolshe-
vism. He called it "the dictatorshii
of the Proletariat."
e* * *
Stanley Baldwin tendered the res- -
ignation of his Conservative ministryl
and advised the sovereign to send for
James Ramsay Macdonald. The king
took Mr. Baldwin's advice. Mr. Mac-
donald bas already formed his cab- .
inet and taken over the reins of thej
Tovernment.
Walton Newbold, British Commun-- -
ist, said: "Behind Macdonald, Asquith

CAPTAIN KOIM STARTS
HORSEMANSHIP CLASSES
Captain Ion C. Holm, of the Unit-
ed States cavalry, who is in Ann Ar-
bor in the interests of the Citizen 's
Military Training corps has orraniz-
ed classes .n horsemanship and rid-

the decorations.
Anoth feature dance will be the
"ance of the eskimo village". In it
all the lights will be dimmed with the'
Oeteeption of 'those shining fromu the
doors of the igloos that will surround
the sball room. In another dance the
sidelights will be done away with, sc
that the stars that will be mounted on
the blue canopied skylike dome, alone
will glitter with their cold light upon
the revellers beneath.

le',F.W tees rely -, o te university of asn ngton h s
ee. F. . Stevensormerly general access to the fisheries of Puget Sound
counsel of the Pere Marquette ril- and Alaska, both notable for salmon,
road and associated with the J. P. A. where there are many fishing vessels,
gan and company of New York, M. A. 'cannaries, cold-storage plants and fer-
Ives, and H. B. Earhart who compose tilizer factories. In Washington. the
the executive committee of the Stu-conisth saeadteFeia
d . counties, the state and the Federal :j
dent Christian association met yester- Government operate numerous hatch
lay afternoon at Lane hall to discuss3 eries where salmon and trout are pro
the executive bus'ness of the institu- pagated. The halibut industry Gen-
iak.' hrters in British Columbia, northern
Jack DeTax, '25, chairman of the Washington and southeastern Alaska.
financial drive, and Donald Williams,

IU *Y1\'l * t **. . . . 7;1 a iL -* -t c bv
credit for last night's victory. I
man expended every bit of energ:
put the Maize and Blue on the
eird of the score, and the indomit
spirit so characteristic of Mich.
teams again .refused to admit de
in the face of heavy odds.
ll. iggerty, lipke. Shooting Star
However the offensive play of
diminutive but flashy George Hag
ty and long-shot artist Harry K
warrants special mention. Both
figured in the scoring of the win:
baskets, with the former sinking
goals in the second half and on
the first stanza. The defensive
of Doyle, Deng and Cherry also
tured the game.
Ray Eklund, Gopher gridiron ;
was the pivot about which the P
nesota offense revolved. Heavy
tall, a clever dribbler and a rem:
able shot, this athlete almost sl
ed doom for the Wolverines.
MICHIGAN
FG F

Douglass Lore, '25, whose name was
itted from a recent article on the
11, is chairman of the finance com-
ttee.
Students Wanted to Decorate '
at Hop It
Students who wish to work in '
putting up the decoration for the 1I
J-Hop may make applications '
for positions by writing to Har-
old Cassidy at 1805 Washtenaw.
About 12 men are needed to '

y i~ VJx=AA11L. " 4 7u-" , m ncE wx ~ Le committee as stu
in still another feature dance, the F
ng for University students. lights used on the aurora borealis that dent representatives.
University 'men and one of 20 wo- ill-be painted on one end of the ball New Radio Machine Appears
men have been holding weekly ses- room alone will be piedominate. This Washington, Jan. 26.-A nickel-in-
sions since the beginning of the aurora borealis wpinted ihundredy the-slot radio receiving outfit has
school year. Captain Holn has been rof blendedcolos, paiten htedtheslts radoecevn oft
lecturing on the theory of riding up1 a bank of colored lights and by tiny The receiver is equipped with
to date, but he plans to follow this spotlights. These lights will.sline special apparatus devised by D. J.
series of lectures by practical work I upon the dancers. Richardson of Washington, which giv-
after spring vacation. This course } -es patrons advance information as toi
will give the students the essentials INew York Doctor the immediate availability of etherial
of riding, the rudiments of polo, cross- entertainment and posts a warning 20
country riding and jumping.Hseconds before another nickel is re-
Arrangements have been made by quired to enable them to enjoy an un-
Mr. Guy L. Mullison for a special r..d-Ainterrupted performance. -
ing course to be.- located in the Bar-# Dr. Alfred F. Hess, professor of ________
ton hills district. pedriatics at Belleview hospital med- Coolidge on Cruise
ical college, New York city, is to de- . J 2 e r - I
asigo,liver a, lecture at 7:30 o'clock Tues- Wahgtn Jan. 26.-The P'resi- {
Fence Built Under ace nianrou the a e t 7:30to'clo te- dential yacht Mayflower cruised down
I d~. in; the west amphitheater of the Pao casfrsQuti.Va
Fences are to be placed around the Medical building, and has announced1 the Patomac as far as Quantico, Va. 1
new literary building under the sec- i - ...ai --. f ..kam m"i ., today with President and Mrs. Conl-!1:

DEMAND FOR EGYPTIAN
ANTIQUES ON INCREASE
Luxor, Egypt, Jan. 26.-The
discovery-, in the valley of the
kings has given a great increase
to the trade in "antikas", as the
Egyptians call them, for whichI
Luxor has been the headquar-
ters for many years.
The main source of supply of
genuine antiques, which are rare,
lies in the peasants who often
dig up interesting and even val-
uable pieces in the field, and in
the native diggers employed by
the foreign excavators.
At present the first demand
of every foreign tourist is fort
a relic relating to Tutankhamen.
Tha demand far exeds the

1

Haggerty, LF.......... 6
Deng, RF.. ...........3
1 Doyle, C ... ,........0
Kipke, LG.. . 3
Cherry, RG..........1
Total 13
MINNESOTA
FG
I Eklund, LF............ 5
Racey, RF.............. 3
# Pesek, C................ 4
Oiolsen, LG... . 1
Dunder, RG...........0.0

1
0
0
3

t1

6
F
2
1
t

't='

I'

Total 13 1
Th~-..,.1.-a,-+,.., N V .'Tan.29.

S

E

R

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