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October 03, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-10-03

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THE WEATHER
FAIR; CONTINUED
MODERATE

A6F A6F
-46,
Affir

~~it

ASSOCIATED PRESS
IEASED WIRE SERVICE
MEMIBERl
WEST1Ed:N CO N F1-:N EENCE
EI1fTOIIA L .\$SOCIA TION

VOL. XXXIV. No. 9EEIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1923 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CENTS

y "_'_ i

CAMPUS NOTABLES
TONIGHTAT UNION
SMOKER PLANNED TO ACQUAINT
CLASS WITH CAMPUS"
ACTIVITIES
PROF. W. D. HENDERSON
WILL ADVISE NEW MEN
Itarry Kipke, Howard Donahue and
Thomas Lynch Also
To Speak.
Members of the freshman class will
gather at 7:15 o'clock tonight in the
Assembly hall of the Union at a smok-
er that will be the first enterprise of
a campaign to bring the yearlings intoI
close contact with the upperclassmen
of the University and interest them in
campus activities.
Prof. William D. Henderson, of the
University Extension department,
principal speaker of the evening, will1
Introduce the new men to the campus.
and show methods through which
they can be of the greatest aid to the
school. He will be followed by sever-j
al student leaders of campus activi-
ties who will explain to the freshmen
their sphere of activity.
In this capacity Howard Donahue,
'24, managing editor of The Daily,I
will tell of the opportunities for work
on the campus publications; Harry
Kipke, '24, captain of the 1923 football
team, will speak on the athletics ofa
the University, and Thomas J. Lynch,
'25L, president of the Union, will dis-
cuss the activities of that organiza-
tion. The speakers will not only tell
of the function of their activity on
the campus, but will explain oppor-
tunities that work in the various fields
will bring to the new men.
A smoker has been arranged by the
Upperclass Advisory committee of
which Charles Merriam, '25E, is chair-
man. The committee is undertaking to
bring about a closer feeling between
freshmen and the upperclassmen and
In this wa'y to bring about an inter-
est in the campus among the first
year men. The smoker is one of the
first moves in this campaign.
CmADUATES GIVEN
Ho 0. T. Co COMMISSIONS'
Commissions as second lieutenants

W. C. T. U. Protest
Bans "Black Oxn
Rochester, N. Y., Oct. 2.-As a re-
sult of the protest by the Monroe
county W. C. T. U., Mayor Van Zandt
has ordered "Black Oxen," a novel
by Gertrude Atherton, removed from
the shelves of all public libraries in
the city.
In the report to the mayor an offi-
cial of the W. C. T. U. delegated to
read the book declared it was unfit
for the minds of young people.
TWENTY CANDIDATES IN
OPERA9 POSTER CONTE ST
PARTICIPANTS MUST SUBMIT
WORK BEFORE MIDNIGHT
TOMORROW
Twenty men have entered the poster
contest for the eighteenth annual
Union Opera and will submit their
posters before the contest closes at 12
o'clock tomorrow night.
Three prizes will be given for the
three best posters. The one winninf-
the contest will receive $10, and the
two taking the second and third placer
will receive complimentary tickets tc
a performance of the Opera at the
Whitney theater. Two of the three
judges selected to judge the contest
are: Bruce Donaldson of the fine arty
department, and Wilfred B. Shaw, '04.
The third will be named later.
The men who will submit posters for
the contest are: Erwin L. Broecker
'27, W. H. Stewart, '24, H. D. Dollinger.
'24A, Earl Sawyer, '26A, G. F. DA Bolt
'2GM, G. W. Crowe, '26E, W. A. War
rick, Jr., '27, F. R. Smith, '25, V. H.
Sidman, '25A, L. J. Perry, '24A, J. C
Harrington, '24A, Walker Everett, '26
Halsey Davidson, '24, L O. Dohlberg
Clayton Seagers, '24, E. B. Winchell
'25, C. W. Johnson, '26, F. E. Hill, '26;
'26, Alvin Wolfson, '25L, and H. L
Stager, '24A.
MOORE INTERVIEWS 100
CHORAL UNION TRYOUTS1
Prof. Earl V. Moore, director of the
School of Music, interviewed more
than 100 tryouts for the Choral Union
for the year in room 107 at the School
of Music yesterday from 4 to 8
o'clock. Opportunity for those who
have not tried out will be given this
evening from 7 to. 8:30 o'clock and to-
morrow afternoon from 4:30 to 5:30
o'clock and from 7 to 8:30 o'clock to-
morrow evening.
Prof. Moore hopes to have a Chorall

D PASSES CHICAG
ON VOYAGE EAST

RADIO

COMMUNICATION STATES
SHIP IS DELAYED
BY WINDS

SAILS OVER CLEVELAND
BUT NOT OVER DETROIT

Air

Leviathian Left St. Louis at
9:30 Yesterday
Morning-

BULLETIN
Toledo, Ohio, Oct. 2.-(By A.
P.)-The ZR-1 passed to the east
of Toledo at 10:35 o'clock this
evening, flying low and apparent-
ly contlnuing towards Cleveland
without flying directly over the
city.
Chicago, Oct. 2.-(By A. P.)-The
naval dirigible, ZR-1, approached Chi-
cago at low speed at 4:15 o'clock cen-
tral time today. It circled slowly
over the aviation field and then head-
ed north over the shore of Lake Mich-
igan.
The naval radio station operators
reported that they believed the dirigi-
ble radio apparatus was out of order
temporarily as they were unable to
receive any message as the ship en-
tered the city. As word was passed I
that the dirigible was in Chicago, fire
sirens shrieked and a racket com-
to the street.
menced that soon brought thousands
Crowds Throng "Loop"
In a short time the "loop" was a
mass of humamty with necks craned
skyward. It was estimated that the
ship could not be seen in the business
section for 20 minutes.
Advice of the naval radio station
dirigible, when radio communication
here from Admiral Moffett aboard the
was re-established as the ZR-1 passed
over Chicago, said that the head winds
had held the ship back two hours and
hence it would proceed directly te
Lakehurst, New Jersey.
Admiral Moffett reported that the
ship averaged about 50 miles an hour
subject to the direction and velocity
of the wind. The ship left St. Louis
on its return trip to Lakehurst, N. J.
at 9:30 o'clock this morning.
It was Admiral Moffett's first trip
in the giant craft, and the first time
in history that a Rear-admiral's flag=
was flown from a non-rigid craft, ac-
cording to reports. Admiral Moffett
will return to St. Louis for the Pulitzer
air races Saturday.
ZR-3 Under Construction
Just before his departure from St.
Louis on the ZR-1 Admiral Moffet,
said that the ZR-3, under construction
in Germany, was completed, adn would
be put in service between New Yorl'
dn L~n(n d n n il rinrn

Repertory Theater
To Play Ervine 's
"Mixed Marriage"
"Mixed Marriage", the second offer-
ing of the Miichigan Repertory thea-
ter, will be given it 8:15 toii'ght at
the Whitney. 'lhe Ia.;, Ly St. John
Ervine, differs in tyTe from "The
Mollusc', being laid is Yelfast and
chiefly concerned with the story of an
Irish boy of strict Protestant family
who unfortunately loves a young
Catholic girl. From a technical
standpoint, "Mixed Marriage" is su-
perior to the previous play, since ti
deals with a more fundamental :ucs-
tion, and gives an opportunity for
really excellent acting.
Tickets may be obtained at the box
office of the theater all day today and
at the booth in Tappan hall. The
prices range from 75 cents to $1.50.
Liowden, Catt, Lindsay, White and Lea-
cock among T en Numbers
of the Course
MAL ORPERS To BE GIVEN
P1REFER1ENCE THIS SEASON
Application blanks for individual re-
served seats for the Oratorical asso-
ciaton lecture course program to be
given this year will be distributed to-
day. Mail order blanks along with
folders telling of the program will
be taken to all of the women's dormi-
torities, fraternity and sorority house's

WALTON DEFEATED
BY H UGE MAJORITY
IN 0KIAHO MA PDLL
PAVES WAY FOR EXAMINATION
OF GOVERNOR'S OFFI-
CIAL RECORD
QUARTER OF RETURNS
INDICATE LANDSLIDE

I

Governor Declares Fight Not
Despite Repudiation,
By Populace

Over

Will Address '27«5
At UnionTonight
WHENEOIC!SMEET

i

and placed at various places on the
campus and at the book stores. I
October 6 hast Day
The mail order sale of tickets this
year is to have preference over all
other seat sales and for this rason all
persons desiring good seats are ad-

Oklahoma City, Okla., Oct. 2.-(By
A. P.)-With virtually one fourth of
the state heard from at 9:30 o'clock it
was indicated that a constitutional
amendment to open the way for the
tate state legislature to consider the
official record of Governor J. C. Wal-
ton had swept to victory with the
greatest majority ever recorded in an
election in Oklahoma.
Expect 250,000 Majority
On a basis of returns up to that hour-
compiled by four newspapers of the
state it was indicated that the megsure
majority. Six hundred fifty precincts
would pass by approximately 250,000
out of 2,837 on the proposition gave
Yes 76,361; No 17,511.
It is estimated that the total vote
will be approximately 450,000.
Partial returns from 38 out of 77
counties in the state indicate that the
measure had passed in each.
Walton Defies Klan
Governor J. C. Walton issued the
following statement at 9:30 o'clock:
"The fight on the Invisible Empire
has just started in Oklahoma. I am
still governor of the state.,
At that hour the returns indicated
that a majority of 250,000 votes had
been cast in a special election today
for a measure opening the way for
peachment charged against him.
the state legislature to consider im-
Governor Called Despotle
In a statement issued tonight Rep
W. D. Mcee of Stephens county, said
that "such an overwhelming majority
has repud'ated Gov. Walton's admin-
istration, that it no longer can be rep-
resentative of a small portion of the
Rep. McBee is a leader in the n-
peachment movement against the gov
ernor.
"Governor Walton's despotic meth.
ods and high-handed system of hand
flug affairs during the few months he
has been governor have become se
disgusting to the people that they have
risen up at the first opportunity a'
the polls and have given him such r
rebuke that. an ordinary man woulc
not recover in years," McBee asserted

Prof. William D. Henderson
Professor Henderson of the Univer-
-ity Extension department will be one
of the principal speakers at the fresh-1
man smoker tonight.
FRECAST RESIGNITION
OF STRESSEMA9N CABINET
Berlin, Oct , 2.-(By A. P.)-The
early retirement of the cabinet of
Chancellor Stresseman was unofficial-
ly forecasted this evening as the out-
come of the parliamentary deadlock
over the chancellor's program for I
economic reform and the opposition of
the socialists to the existing state of
emergency. At 8:30 o'clock this eve-I
ning the chancellor was conferring
with President Ebert. At 9:30 the
chamber was closeted with the presi-
dent and belief was expressed in au-
thoritative circles that the resignation
of the cabinet might be expected some-
time during the night in consequence
of the socialist's cabinet threat to
support the communists.
Berlin, Oct. 2.-(By A. I.)--The
Stressemann cabinet was still in ses-
sion at 1 o'clock this morning. A pro-
longed controversy was precipitated
by the socialist demand that Bavaria
repeal her martial law decree.
CINDER TRACK BEIN1G
BUILT NEAR GYMNASIUM
The old circular wooden track
which was placed between the Medical
school and Waterman gymnasium has1
been torn up and work on a new cin-
der track is now under way. With the
drawings completed and the grading
done, the actual construction work

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COUNCIL C 3I TTEE ANNOU'NCES
TlIME AM) PLACE OF
MAJORITY OF CLASSES
WILL ELECT TOMORROW
System To lie sed Differs From
rjjhaE Employed hj
Past
Elections of officers in the various
classes in the University will be held
today and tomorrow, it was announced
last night by the Student council elec-
Lions committee. The senior and
freshman medi~s come first with
meet'ngs scle(.aled for this afternoon.
These classes will gather at 4 and
4:10 o'clock respectively at the medi-
cal amphitheater in the hospital and
the west amphitheater in the medical
building.

I

in the R. 0. T. C. were given to 53 Union of 400 members at the first
graduates last year as a result of four rehearsal which will be held Octo-
years work in the local unit. This is { ber 16. Those who are accepted will
the first class that has secured its be notified by mail before that date.'
commissions after completing its en- More rehearsals will be held this year
tire work at Michigan. Although com- than has been the case in former
missions had been given previous to years.

i
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1

i 7- -iana ionaon as a maz carrier, on a
last year, they were given to those }w_-day shcZdule. He 1ais added a
havnn dvacedcreit.two-day shcedule. IHe also added that
havlnng advanced credit. Hobbs Returns Today the next flight of the ZZR-1 would be
Four men in the class of 1923 se- Prof. William I. Hobbs, head of the from Lakehurst, N. J., to Panama, re
cu ed commissions as second lieu -ter gology department, who has spent turning via Cuba.
the summer in Australia and the is about 4,000 miles. Nothing pro
taking examinations at Fort Wayne. southern Pacific, will return to Ann The cruising radius of the giant shi
The commissions given by the gov- Arbor tonight. IItrudes outside the great helium fillet"
ernent were divided as follows: Sig- Professor Hobbs made the trip pri- bag but six gondolas, suspended un-
nal corps, 11 men; Coast Artillery, 32 marily to attend the Pan-Pacific Sci- derneath, each of which is equippe
men; Ordnance, 7 men; and the In- entific congress, which was held at w:th a G00 horsepower Packard motor
fantry unit, 3 men. Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. The radio communication receive,
r During his stay in Australia, Profes- from Admiral Moffett as the ship war
iLeague Benefits sor Hobbs was the guest of Sir Doug- ship would pass over Cleveland anc
las Mawson, the noted geologist and passing over Chicago, stated that thr
B Chimes Sales explorer. Toledo, but would not go over Dc-iroit
Chimes and the Women's league have Two Weeks Time Wti Vanish
started a co-operative plan. Chimes'
has arranged to give the Woman's When Julian Calendar Expires
league a percentage on all subscrip-
tions the women sell. Of the regular
$1.50 per year subscription price the1
League will receive 25 cents. In giv- October fourteenth will find virtu- countries unofficially changed from
ing a subscription through the League ally the entire Christian world in the Julian to the Gregorian calendar
the student is getting full value by athe war but nothing had been
year's subscription to Chimes, and the chronological step for the first time lone before last May toward making
League is benefited at the same time. since the Gregorian calendar was cre- (oe betor laMatoward making
atedin 582 AndOctberwill be the action permanent. The trouble
theasorte st1monhdinhistobrforil-is not entirely cleared up yet, as the
Symphony Orchestra Cllls Tryouts the shortest month in history for m orthodox churchmen insist on accept-
Tryouts for the University Sym- lions of men and women. ing the opinion of the Serbian astro-
phony orchestra will be held between This change is brought about'by the nomer, Professor Trpkovic, that our
7 and 8 o'clock tonight and tomorrow fact that at mid-night of October 13 modern calendar will put us off one
night at the School of Music. Candi- the old Julian calendar will expire. day in every 3,000 years. To prevent
Tievnwihiofgetimport- a neey300 er.T rvn
dates should bring some music with 'Tis event, which is of great t such an error the Pan-Orthodox fol-
ivbich they are familiar. Freshmen ance to more than 100,000,000 Eastern
arec eliibe sare famlor.wFme.hmong Orthodox Christians, is made possible lowers say that there must b)e no Feb-
are eligible as are also women. AmongOrhdxCrsinsmaepsbe ruary 29, 2000. But inasmuch as that
by a decree announced last May by amay2,00.Btisucasha
violinists only experienced players "yadOthdo Conges ld in Cy ais 77 years away there is no need for
should apply . "Pan-Orthodox Congress' held in Con-jimmediate worry.
StLinolk The congress decreed I

vised to send in their application along
with the required money enclosed to
Frank HI. Backstrom, '24, 806 hTill
street. All of these orders will be
illed in order of receipt and must be
mailed by October 6.
The general ticket sale will take
place between 1 and 5 o'clock on the
afternoons of October 9, 10, 11 and 12
n Hill auditorium.
Instead of selling reserved sections
as was done last year, only individual I
reserved seats may be purchased. The I
three center sections on the main f'oor
will sell for $3 for. the season, while
the two side sections on thel main floor
and tho first 10 rows in the balcony
will be priced at $2.50. The balance te
be unreserved will sell at $2. Tickets
for each program will be prced at $1.
In the program this year are a great
number of well-known lecturers in-
cIluding former Governor 'rank o
Lowden, Mrs. Carrii C hapmian Catt,
William Allen White, Judge Ben
Lindsay, Leon liakst , Arthur We1-
gall, and Steph1en Leacock. in
the way of dramale emtoertain-j
ment, Miss Gay MacLaren wll
give Gilda Varnesi's "Emiter Madam.,,
On November 27, Stuart Walker's
Portmanteau Players will g've two,
performances, presenting at the mat-
inee "The Gods of the Mountains"
and "The Murderers" and in the eve-
ning "The Book of Job.".,
orner Governor Lowden will open
the program on October 12 with an
address on the 'Organization of
Government." All numbers on the
coursewill b) given in 'ill audi-
torium.
LfIIHNUoM IN IPIIAI

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is to begin by the first of next week.1
g In addition to a circular cinder trackf
a traiglhtaway path will also be laid.
irrJ S The building and grounds department.
SUSUOM UU LL istates that this work is to be con-
pleted within the next three weeks. _
Several permanent positions are Owing to a delay in the delivery or
il available in the i material, work on the relining and re-
stil avilale thefils o th Un placing of tile in the shower baths ,
versity employment service, accord- plac intsmhs bths
ng o Ms. am' 1~ Sewat, ho jof Waterman gymnasimut has not yet.
n tog ors. Mary L. Stewart, who is been begun. The material is expected a
in chargo of the work.,ihn enx ewdy n h et
ludents who wish to work for their within reworkxisto fbebegundim etely
.oard or room can still secure posi- pn is .
tions. There is an ovrsppyo upon its arrival. t
on" ttre time of Extensive repair work on the slai
"ro"jobs a h present tm since roofing of the gymnasium has also
nst students are located for the year been completed and some of the gy-
''lie supply of odd jobs continues te nasium equipment has been replaced.
be plentiful as is always the case dur- !_-
ing the year, Mrs. Stewart says. MATINEE MUSICAL WILLf
ORGANIZE STUDENT LEAGUE
Surveyors Safe
All women students who are in-
In Arizona Flood terested in the formation of a Matinee
Mufor n
Peac SpingAriona Oct 2.(ByI of imusic of college age, will m t at.
Peach Spring, Arizona, Oct. 2.-(Ey 4 o'clock this afternoon at Hlelen New-I
A. .)-The Colorado river surveyors berry residence. to discuss plans for
emerged unharmed today from the th
flood--swept gorges of the Grand Can- the organization of such a league. En-
k couraged by the success of the inusic
yom wher~e they have been isolated cuae ytesceso amsc
soin e ptebhavbee4 nhisolaed-;memory contest held last year, Matinee
since Septeumber 14 durinig their navi-I Musicale is tal .ng this opp~ontumityt
gation of the uncharted river. They 1uiaei a gti potny
gal oimof he nchrte rier.Timy Ito further that interest in better music
arrived at 10 a. in. at Diamond creekfforthercommt s.ru
trail. for the community.
The ten members of the party, who If such a plan proves successful,
were delayed four days in their steps will be taken to supplement the
scheduled arrival at Diamond creek, organization with a junior league for
escaped the fury of the Colorado students of high school age. Teache s I
flood by climbing through a crevice to are asked to present the names ofj
high ground, mnembers of the party those students who are prepared to ,
said. From a precipice, they then saw take part in such programs.
a wvahl of xvater sweeping through the -_______ -
canyon. The party was forewarned of Quadrangle Society To fleet
the flood by rapidly rising waters for Quadrangle society will meet for the
several hours before it came in full first time this fall at 8 o'clock tonight
force. Iin the home of Prof. U. B. Phillips, of

Lits Meet Tomorrow
The senior, junior and sophomore
lasses in the literary college will
old their elections tomorrow after-
oon. All classes in the law and dent-
I colleges and the junior and sopho-
ore classes in the medical school
ill also meet at this time. The
reshman literary class, classes in the
rehitecture school and those in the
chool of education and liharmacy col-
ge will hold meetings at -a date to
,e announced later.
This year the system of elections
vill be different than it has been in
he past. There wvll be four officers to
oe named for each class: president,
ice-president, secret arye and treasury.
iny number of names may be put up
or nomination of an office. A first
rallot will then be taken on these
ames and the two receiving the
iglhest number of votes will be the
andidates for the office. Election
Ballots will then be passed and these
wo names voted upon for the oflice
umediately. In previous years an-
ther meeting has been called for the
nal vote.
Engineers Vole Today
As the senior and sophomore eng-
wers have already made their nomi-
ations for, class officers, further
meetings will not be necessary. All
ngineering classes will vote from' 8
o 2 o'clock tomorrow on the names
>resent ed, by placing their ballots in
oxes to be posted in the Engineering
wilding. 'he .imior and freshman
mgineer'ng classes will meet at 8
end 11 o'clock this morning respect-
vely to name their candidates. *
The places where the literary
lasses xwill.gather tomorrow are as
oliows : seniors, at 4:30 o'clock in
,ewbcrry flal lnditorium; juniors at
O 'clock at the iname place; and sopho-
imores at 4 o'clock at room 101 eco-
otics luilding.
Thesen ior(dental class will meet
t 5 o'clock in the upper amphitheater
SI'lie denltluldimig the junior class
it 5 oclock in the junior lecture room;
he sophomores ai 5 o'clock in the
tower amphilheater; and the fresh-
nen at 4 o'clock in the lower amphi-
The law clases xwii all meet at 4
o'clok <tomorrow- as follows: seniors
n room Gla, building; juniors in
room D; and freshmen in room C.
All other classes not announced 'will
hold elections at dates to tbe an-
nounced later. Student councilmen
will be in charge o all the meetings.
GUILD ANNOUNCES
FAMIOUS SPEAKERS
The Wesleyan Guild has announced
the let ui'i's ospeak time first sem-
ester und r the Ienry Martin Loud
lectureship. James Schermerhorn,
journalist, will speak October 7 and
Raymond robins, social economist,
October 23. lEdwin Markham, poet-
philosopber, will speak November 4
and Bishop Theodore S. hiederson,
November 11.
The only lecture in December will
be given December 2, by Dr. C. Wal-
lace Petty, pastor of the First Bap-
tist church of Pittsburgh. Dr. Ste-
phen K. Mahom, pastor of the Ep-
worth M. E. church of Toledo will
speak Jlanuary 6 and Louis K. Ans-
pacher, dramatist and lecturer, will
s1peak January 20. All the lectures
will be given in the Methodst church
except 1iishop Henderson, which will
be given in hill auditorium.
llospital Patients Fewer

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UUIIiIUUII I I IMI IRL0
TO I S I T COOLIDGE
Washington, Oct 2.---(y A. P.)-
Magnus Johnson, farmer-laor Senator,
froni IMinnesota, camie to Washington
today to confer with President Cool-t
idge and to familiarize himself witli
what are to be his futur surround-
the Wh to house at noon tomorrow
ings on "capitol hill." He will visit
and will leave in mid-afternoon for
Chicago, xhlere lie is to speak Friday
night.
Senator Johnson, accompanied by;
George B. Brewer, of M inneapolis, a1
lpolitical advisor, slipped quietly into
town just hefore noon, coming fromn
New vYork and Philadlelphia.1
1oard ng a street car he went to the
National hotel on Penm iylva ia ae-
mime, a. fcxwblocks fr-om the (Capitol.

PROBABLY COOLER
Do you feel that sting in the air?
This is real football weather
we've been having. This chill
puts pep and spring into you as
Jimmie does in the Classifieds.
Have you any cold facts on how
to keep warm? Call
CALL

s Santnie p . 116 V0 -_1
that all the faithful who rise from
their beds on the morning of what
would be October 1 under the Julian
calendar shall say: "This is October
14."
This action is made necessary by
the fact that Julius Caesar miscal-
culated when, in 45 B. C., after hav-
ing ordered that the people use the
same date for 90 consecutive days-
in order that the world might get rid
of three superfluous months-he
ordered that there be a leap year ev-
ery four years. This was, ofcourse,

There are still some 8,000,000
Christians in the world, of whomn 500;-
000 are in the United States, who will
continue to cling to the Julian calen-
dar after October 13. They are known i
in'America as Ruthenian Catholics, in
Europe as Greek Catholicstor Uniates.
They refused to accept the change
mainly because of their dislike for the
Eastern Orthodox National churches.
Guild Banquets Freshmen
The Friendly Group department of
the wesleyan guild tendered a ban-

Yesterday's Gam

ies

the history department, 1954 Cam-
bridge road. Prof. D. H. Parker will
deliver a paper, "A Critique of Con-
formnity."

.!
.

luj Ired Si aumol's R a'h Sa el y
Librpool, Oct.2.-'Tim1f( 'dric and
Scythi, aft em' asoseil hgin fog, live
reac-hed the Memrsy;them'e Nwe_*e sev-
gee , many onii h I ln r.; Innmuon

Detroit 7; Chicago 5.
Philadelphia 6; Washington 1.
St. Louis 10; Cleveland 5.
BIrooklyn 5; Boston 2.

October Chimes Delayed
- The first issue of Chimes, scheduled
until tomorrow, according to JoIn-
to appear yesterday will not 1e out
Bacon, '24, managing editor. The de-

l
t!

Studet aunder care in the' Univer-
sity ho- ; ital number fewer this year
than at the corresponding time in the
lat two yoars. hInst year there were

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