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January 17, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-01-17

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I

THE WEATHER
COLDER WITH SNOW
FLURRIES TODAY

t '

iitl

ASSOCIATED PRES
LEASED WIRE SERN
MEM1BER
WESTERN CONFERE
EDITORIAL ASSOCIA'

r

r

VOL. XXXIV. No. 83

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY'17, 1924

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE C

VARSITY GLEE IEN
TO GIVE, CLASSIC
POGRAM TONIGRTI

CLUB ABANlDONS VAUDEVILLE
TYPE OF OFFERING
OF PAST
WILL ENTER MID-WEST
CONTESTS IN CHICAGO
rachmnaninoff, Stanley, Bullard,
Among Great Composers
Represented
Changing its policy from a vaude-
ville type of entertainment to an ul-
tra-classical one, the University Glee
club will give its pre-contest concert
,t 8:00 o'clock tonight in Hill audit-
orium. George Oscar Bowen, direct-
r of the club, has arranged a pro-
gram which he expects will be well re-
ceived, inasmuch as the new policy
is expected to create some comment.
The club will give a recital in Ypsi-
lanti next Wednesday night, and will
journey to Chicago on Feb. 18, where
Michigan is entered in the Glee club
competitions between mid-western
schools.
R. Winfield Adams, S. of M., bari-
tone, will render a group of solos. An
org;n selecton by Philip E. LaRowe,
25, is also on the program, and thej
string quartet organized especially
for this concert, will offer a group of
light classical numbers. The Var-
sity Quartet and the Glee club will be
heard in classical and college songs.
The followng program will be givenj
tonight.
Laudes Atque Carmina Stanley
Glorious Forever Rachmaninoff

"Leave Town," Says Alleged
Letter Of Klan To Student
Letters of threatening nature pur- nev4ly-elected stu 4nt Klansinan is
porting to have been written by an making his initial endeavor."
agent of the Ku Klux Klan have been Glascow states that on Tuesday
received by two students, one within, night he was followed about town by
the last 48 hours. four or five men in a small sedan.
Lyman J. Glasgow, '25, 'Varsity When asked whether he proposed to
cheerleader and debater, received a leave the city as demanded, he em-
letter Tuesday morning advising him j phatically declared himself in the
to leave Ann Arbor at once. The let- negative.
ter is quoted verbatim. J3elford V. Lawson, '24, negro a
"Lyman Glasgow: j member of last year's Varsity football
"Our advice to you is to leave squad, also received, just previous to
Ann Arbor now as a result of un- the holiday vacation, a letter signed
friendly things you have said con- I "K. K. K." Ile, however, was not
cerninig the K. K. K. Leave now ordered to leave the city. le was told
while your friends know where that he was "too active"; he should
you are. Expecting to see you "stay in his place"; and to "speak
gone in a month. K. K. K." when spoken to." Lawson's letter,
This letter was written on bluebook unlike Glasgow's, came through the
paper, and was dropped into the mail mail, and was written on plain type-
box on the porch of Glasgow's room- writer paper.
ing house. "My first thought", said Lawson,
"The 'unfriendly things'," says "was that it had been sent by some-
Glasgow, "were lengthy criticisms one who did not like me. But in con-
which I included in an oration writ- sideration of other events it may beI
ten last fall in preparation for the possibly an authentic Klan letter.
Oratorical contest, and presented in It doesn't frighten me any."
public speaking class. The paper on The flaming cross sign of the "In-
which the letter was written and the visible Empire", appeared for the first
fact that these statements were made time in Ann Arbor last Saturday
in class, lead me to believe that some night.
DEBATERS LEAVERAD
FOREVANTONCNVENION HOIC

CURSE HANGps OVER
ASSERTS EXPERTS NOW AGREE
IFEREWS LEFT EGYPT IN
ITT'S TIME
CLAIMS OLD MONARCHS
MEANT ONLY BLESSINGS I
Noted .Egyptologst Gives Illustrat'd
Evening Lecture in lIll
Auditorium

BALDWIN REGIME
TO RESIGN AFTER
PARLIAMENT TlO AI)JOFURN FOR
T11 lE E WEE IS A LLd)WUN ( MC-
lONALD TO FOrMf CABINET
SPEECHES BY LIBERALS
TO BE TAKEN UP FRIDAY
Business of House Today Deals with
Foreign Affairs; British Itc-ations
with France Discussed

TODAY IS LAST CHANCE
TO GET J-1hOP TICKETS
All J-Hop tickets not called
for by 4 o'clock this, afternoon
will be forfeited, it was an-
nounced by the ticket commit-
tee of the Hop yesterday. Any
students having accepted appli-
cations that have not called for
their tickets at the times desig-
nated may do so at 3 o'clock I
today. Complaints that have
been received by the ticket com-
mittee will be answered Satur-
day. Only 700 tickets will be
sold to the Hop this year, this
' policy having been adopted to
do away with the crowded con-
ditions that have existed at
former HoDs.
ME1XICAN FEDERALS
D[FEATRBLAM
Revolutionists Assume Position At
Tepeaca on Rliroad Between
Tehuacan and Puebla
GENERAL URVALEJO COMMANDS
ATTACK ROUTING ENEMY UNITSj

i

GIANT OIRIGIBL
BREAKS MOORINI
30 MEN ON BOA

"The three supposed curses of the I London, Jan. ]6.-(By A. P.)-A di-
royal Egyptian tombs are really bless- vision on the labor party's non-con-
ngs on those who may be instru- fidence amendment will be taken in
mental in recovering their bodies," the house of commons at 11 o'clock
Afthur Weigall. noted Egyptologist Monday night, it virtually was de-
and late inspector-general of antiqui- cided today. This means that. the
ties of the Egyptian government, said ;Baldwin government will resign on
last night in his illustrated lecture Tuesday.
in Hill auditorium. "The much talk- Parliament will then adjourn, prob-
ed of 'Curse of the Tombs' is really ably for three weeks, to allow J.
the product of European and Ameri- Ramsay McDotald to form a cabinet
can imagination," he stated. and get his ministers in the routine
Mr. Weigall showed slide after slide of their novel positions before they
to impress his audience with the won- face parliament again.
der and beauty of these tombs of the Some of the labor men today tried
ancients. The majority of the tombs to hurry affairs, so that in the event
with which he dealt are located in the of a railway strike materializing dur-
famous "Valley of Kings." It was J ing the week end, the new labor gov-
here that the pharaohs sought to hide ernment should be in power to deal
their bodies from the ravages of the with it. But there are a number of
many destructive thieves and robbers. liberal speakers eager to make their
Feared Tomb 1ohlars case for supporting labors non-con-
"The greatest worries of the phar- fidence amendment clear in the eyes
aohs in the building of their tombs oftheir constituents, and their
were the ever-present bands of tomb speeches will occupy most of Fri-
robbers. Despite the fact that every day's sittings, thus pushing the di-
possible measure was taken to con- vision over to Monday.
ceal the entrances, the robbers al- The debate in the commons today
ways found and stripped these tombs," for the most part concerned foreignI
the noted lecturer said. affairs, especially British relations

E
E
.

Chicago Team Will Meet Varsity
Affirmative Trio Toniorro v
-Night
TO DISCUSS INDUSTRIAL .
DISPUTES ACT OF 19001

Democrat Heads Ad ourn Without
Dissension Over Award Of 1924
Convention to New York
WILSON IXPRESSES PLEASURE
OVER RESULTS OF COMMITTEE

On the Sea.
The Glee Club
Pale Moon
Varsity Quartet

Buck
LoganI

By Moonlight Spicker3
Now is the Month of Maying Morley
Sword of Ferrara Bullard
The Glee Club
Organ: Theme -nd Variations Bonnet
Phillip LaRoweI
Lungi Dal Caro Bene Secehi
A Man's Song Harris
Cargoes Dobson
R. Winfield Adams

My Little Banjo
The Elfinan
On the Road to Mandalay
The Glee Club
Exaltation
G String Melody
Minuet

Dichmont
Gobson
Speaks

Coerne
Maca
Mozart

String Quartet
Little GreyHome in the West

Lohr

About Clocks
Varsity Quartet

Hammond

College Songs4
Tickets may be obtained at all the
leading book stores and also on the1
campus for 50 cents.
Union To Resume
Tap Room lusic1
Entertainment in the Union tapa
room as regular feature on Friday and.
Saturday nights will be taken up again
this year, it was announced yester-
day. The first entertainment will be
provided tomorrow night when!
Thomas' Collegians orchestra will
play from 9:30 o'clock until 10:30
o'clock.
In addition to the orchestra, the
committee in charge is attempting toI
secure singers for the entertainment.I
The orchestra will play Saturday
at the same hours as tomorrow night.
Graduate Speaks
To Forestry Club I

Chicago, Northwestern and Michi- Washington Jan. 16.-(By A. P.)-' After taking his audience through with France and Germany in connec-
i gan will compete tomorrow night in i Whatever may be the differences many of the famous tombs, Mr. Weig- tion with reparations. When the
the Central league debate which i. all came to the tomb of the last of the house adjourned tonight the way was
amn Dmcat.s.t heprte
held annually between the three uni- among Democrats as to the partiesI pharaohs to be discovered, Tutank- clear for John Robert Clynes to move
versities. Michigan's negative tri, standard bearers next summer and hamen. He described and showed as the first business tomorrow labor's
will leave Ann Arbor this afternoon fall there were no evident sore spots colored slides of many of the arti-, non-confidence amendment.
for Evanston where they will debate left over the award to New York city cles found in the tomb. "The opening
against Northwestern's affirmative of the 1924 convention when the Den- of Tutankhamen's sarcopagus will,
team tomorrow night. Discussion I in all probability, take at least an-
will be on the question: Resolved, I ocratic national committee adjourned other year," he said. I
that the United States should enact a today. Describes Inside of Tomb
law giving to strikers and their con- Upon the adjournment of the na- The speaker descrilbed the feelings PIN.flfl ATIuiT
comitant activities the same right they tional committee when members vis- of a man who enters the tomb of a TfINGreiut-isnaAR
are given under the Industrial dis- ited former President Wilson and mighty ancient after it has been
putes act of 1906. Mrs. Wilson at their home, Mr. Wilson sealed and lost for 3,300 years. "Ev- Leon F. Makiclski of the architec-
The Varsity affirmative team will added his approbation to the choice of erything is dustless and shiny. One
meet the negative team from Chicago New York. . can almost see the footprints on the tural
at 8 o'clock tomorrow night in hill "I am very glad the convention was steps of the last man out 3,300 years o'clock yesterday afternoon in the
auitorium. given to New York," Mr. Wilson told before him." upper gallery of Alumni Memorial
The team leaving for Evanston thise national com- Mr. Weigall brought out the fac' hall, in which he explained the differ-
afternoon, accompanied by GaJet:. m'littee, and added an expression of that Egyptologists are now practic-
Densmore of the public speaking de pleasure overthe results of the coi- ally agreed that the Hebrews left nt varieties of technique used by the
partment, is composed of Melvin mittee's work here. Egypt during the reign of Tutank- artists in the execution of. their
Specter, '25, J. J. Dunn, '26, Horac No movement developed today in hamen. He declared that the records works. Mr. Makielski is considered
Glasgow, '24. Judges of the debate th committee to change the two- of the Hebrews seemed to fit in with one of the foremost art critics of the
with Chicago here tomorrow night thirds voting rule for the conven- those found in the tombs of the an- present day, and his lecture was at-
have been announced as: Judge Lloyd tion's choice of nominees. Neither cients, especially in that of famous tended by an interested gathering of
T. Williams of Toledo, a former honor was any change made in the conven- ' Pharaoh Tutankhamen. members of local art circles.
debater, Prof. Emerson 'V. Miller o 'tion role of 1,094 delegates and alter- "There are many types of technique
the public speaking department aw nates, hut the cemnmifte formnaly -hichcannot be appreciated without
Ohio Weslyan university, and Prof recommended that one half of all LIT 1considerable training," said Mr. Mak-
iW. Demorest, of Scott high school the delegates at large should be wo- IUillski. "The paintings of Leon Bakst,
The presiding officer in the hill men. while, at first seem somewhat crude
auditorium debate will be Prof. ThosU LE1and decidedly unattractive, are really
IH. Reed of the political science de [ Isplendid pieces of constructive and,
partment, a former honor debater a? J1LBM VIIOIHLP creative art, and one should hesitate
Harvard. Washington, Jan. 16.-Another of- to condemn them without at first
RRIiA fer for the development of the Mus- I eing sure of one's ability at criti-
o oiss eas I I llcle Shoals properties by private cap-cis- M wn n
tal was received today by Secretary -r acesk eto t xli
]usicale udiecefI Prof. William II. Hobbs, of the geo- Weeks, from sources which the Sec- that the style of techniue used is also
logical department gave the first of retary declined to reveal but char- dependent on the use to which the fin-!
a series of lectures dealing with mil- acterized as financially reliable. The ished work is to be put. "Several of
Mr the Ypsilanti Conservatory of Mus- itary subjects before the entire unit war secretary also refused to discuss these paintings show a decided tend-
ic hantrs. MaueOs ergr of thse of the R. O. T. C. on the subject of details of the new proposal, explain- ency towards illustrations, and as a1
i and Mrs. Scade Okkelberg of the "Australia In the World War" yester- ing that he first would have a study consequence the careful handling of
University School of Music, pianist, I ef te
were soloists at the monthly meeting day afternoon in the Engineering made by engineer and ordinance ex- tthe paints has been set aside for the
of the Matinee Musicale yesterday af- Building. I perts and later would decide what story telling power needed. It is just
ternon inthe ball roo of the Union. Professor Hobbs speech dwelt with action might be taken by the depart- these few considerations which must
They presented a program of unusual the conrtibutions that Australia made inent with reference to its final dis- be thought of before making any sort
interest as both artists are well to the success of the Allied cause. position. of successful criticism that makes the
knowntoMatine Muiale auen. He explained that their aid came by This makes the fourth offer now hasty opinion of the layman, while
Mrs. Gray has a contralto voice of additions to the tactical knowledge of pending, the other including that of still remaining as his conviction, a
immne srangeand lein gthe armies, and by their great fight- Henry Ford, one from a group of decidedly biased and a fair decision.",
which she uses to best advantage in ing abilities which, acording to Pro- southern power companies and one
the upper register as she has a rather fessor Hobbs', authorty the command- the identity of which has not been {
unpleasant habit of producing her ing general of the Austrailian forces revealed.
'lower notes front her chest giving was the greatest of any of the allied O W N the thratEAstrinedquASSISTANT IStons
them throaty, strained quality, while Professor Hobbs went into detail -i op Rules To Be ror T | 111
her upernotes are of unusual beauty concerning the operations which Sa e As L T YearL"T" "v ' 'u "
and fullness. Her singing of Ras- ghpa Astraame -AsfLastYear

1

Washington, Jan. 16.-(By A. P.)-
Mexican federals have defeated the
revolutionists in a hard battle at Te-
peaca which has resulted in reducing
a strong element in the rebel army
to impotence," the Mexican embassy
said in a statement tonight based on
official advices from Mexico City.
"Rebels under Generals Maycotte
and Villarreal have been decisively de-
feated after a hard battle at Tepeaca,
the statement said. "After being driv-
en from Tehuacan by federal troops
under General Eugenio Martinez the
enemy took up a position at Tepeaca
on the railroad between Tehuacan
and Puebla."
"General Urvalejo attacked them
here and completely broke up the
command, which was made up of sev-
eral of the strongest units at the dis-
posal of the Vera Cruz rebels. The
action has reduced a strong element
of the rebel army to impotence.
"On the Jalisco front the federals
continue the advance on the rebels I
who still are falling back and refus-
ing to give battle."
10 ATTEND MEETING FOR
WRITERS OFENEXT OPERA

55 MILE AN HOUR SOUTHER'
GALE TEARS RIGGING, MASTS'
AWAY
LAST WORD SAYS CRAF
DRIFTS IN STRONG WIN
Officers Rush Fromn Barracks J
Shenandoah Frees Self
With Crash
BULLETIN
Mitchell Field, N. Y., Jan. 16.-
(By A. P.)-Radio communication
with the Shenandoah, navy dirig-
ible which broke from her mast
at Lakehurst, was establihsed at
the army station tonight. The
message read: "All 0. K. Will
ride out storm. We think we are
over New Brunswick. Holding
our own. Verify position and
send up weather information.
Newark, N. J., JTan. 16.-(By A.
P.)-Newark police headquarters
reported that the Shenandoah had
been sighted cvose to the ground
at Dorenmus avenue, over the
Kearney meadows. She had been
hovering there for 20 minutes, It
was reported apparently trying
to make a landing. The meadows
are between Jersey City and New.
ark.
Lakehurst, N. J., Jan. 16.-(By
P)-The navy airship Shenandoal
moored to heavy steel masts for
ten day test, broke away from he
moorings early tonight.
Struck by a strong southeast gal
the giant dirigible drifted aimlessi
and soon was out of sight. A crew
30 men was on board.
Apparently the craft had been dan
aged, for fragments of her outer rIgg
ing fluttered to the ground as sl
sailed away. The wind was blowin
at about 55 miles an hour.
The naval communications office I
New York was notified and official
there immediately .tried to get i:
touch with the Shenandoah by wire
less but at last reports, had been u
I successful.
The Shenandoah broke away fro
her mast shortly before 7 o'clock.
crash audible above the roar of t
storm brought officers and men fro
t their barracks, but they scarcely ha
had time to adjust field glasses Mbe"
fore she was lost in the darkness an
rain.
New York, Jan. 16.-(By AP)-
Officials of the New York weather bu
reau expressed the opinion that th
Shenandoah would be blown towar
Lake Ontario by the southeast gal
that tore her loose from her moorin
mast at Lakehurst, N. J., tonight,
Washington, Jan. 16.-(By AP)-
The nose of the Shenandoah was pull
ed out when she was wrenched fror
the mooring mast, according to a mes
sage received at the Navy departmen
tonight from Captain McCreary a
Lakehurst, N. J., which will interfer
with her steering into the wind. Al
engines are in good condition, howe
em, eh added, and she has on board fut
and oil sufficient to give her ful
speed for 48 hours.
There are also emergency and fres
rations, the message said, for 40 me'
for 48 hours aboard. The radio o
the ship, it was explained was tem
porarily out of commission, becaus
of tests that were being conducte
with it but this was put in commission
in about one hour.

More than 30 students were present
at the meeting held yesterday after-
noon in the Union for those interest-
ed in writing the book and music for
next year's Union Opera. The mem-
bers of the committee in charge of,
the books addressed the men on thej
methods and general plans that they
should follow in writing the manu-
script.
The custom followed out in past
years of the directors stating the ex-
act kind of play which would be de-
sired will not be continued, it was
announced. The writers will be as
little bound by definite rules as poss-
ible, Kemp Keena, '20, asserted.
Tihe men were further informed
that their plot* were not to be of the
heavy type, but that at the same time, j
they were to be definite, and to be
carried through in two acts. The plot{
should not be developed so fast that
it would not be perceivable. Criti-
1 cism from alumni. in regard to thef
Slast year's opera has been received
which states that the play should be
more virile. Keena asserted that it
shouldbeerememberedsthatethe men
were not writing a drama, but a play
really in the form of a musical com-
edy in which anumber of songs and
dances will appear. If a play could
be written dealing with college life
# which would be good, it was advised
to beunderak+n

If
i

Bruce Buell, '19, spoke before the
Forestry club last night on his ex-
periences in Canada working for the
Kee Watin lumber company. Mr.
Buell who is working for a'M. S. F.
degree has spent considerable time in
the north.
Besides the usual business meeting
refreshments and smokes were served.s
Every second meeting of the club,
which meets every two weeks 'on
Wednesday, was made a smoker.
Mararoneck, N. Y., Jan. 16.-Carol
Dempster, injured a few days ago in
the filming of Griffith's "America" is
reported considerably better today.

3
a
E
i

i
I
I

KAU SHTON MAY QUIT AS
COLUMNIANEAD COAC

bach's lovely "Trees" in which the
composer has set to music Joyce Kil-
mer's beautiful poem was best receiv-
ed by the audience. It is a surpass-
ingly beautiful song, and the singer
~did it well. In the last group Wolf's
"Zur Ruh" was best adapted to her
voice as its slow moving tempo and
long held notes gave the singer an
opportunity to display some of the
lovely tones which she possesses.
Mrs. Okkelberg's work is so well-
known that it scarcely needs com-
ment. Her best was Liadow's Bar-
carolle in which she displayed a tech-
nique and musicianship which has
won for her a definite place in the
musical world.
R. G. R.
P an-Amerlcan Resolutions Signed

gE J
so successful. He showed how they Orders from the , quartermaster Plots for the play will have to be i
contributed a new plan of advance Regulations for the J-Hop this year general of the United States army sabmitted by Feb. 5. The plots will
which was so successful that great will be the same as were in effect last were received by First Lieutenant F.' be looked over by the book commit- '
areas of enemy country were captured winter, it was announced yesterday 1. Maslin to proceed at once to Iowa :tee and their authors will be advised,
by a small force of soldiers. by Joseph Bursley, dean of students. State college at Ames, Iowa, to take as to their value. Due to the fact that
- I Dean Bursley said that he considered up the duties there of research as- the dances are expected to be ar-l
CLs that the Hop was carried off well sistant, it was announced yesterday. ranged this semester the final day
Clavel Lectures hlast year. LieutenantlMaslin has been con- that books will be received will be s
On French Town Principal among the rules announc- nected with the Highway Engineering March 10.
ed for the dance are: dancing must department for more than a year as
I cease at 2:30 o'clock and lights must a graduate student and research as-
Prof. Marcel Clavel, of the Romance be out by 3 o'clock; there shall be sistant. He was sent here by the Io
languages department delivered the no spectators; no corsages shall be United States government to study I Set For Tomorrow I
first Cercle Francais lecture yester- Iworn at the Hop; and there shall the tractive resistance of roads. He
day afternoon in West Lecture room 'be no decorations of individual booths will be an assistant in quartermaster
of the Physics building. Professor except by the Hop committee. Most tractive resistance of roads research 3-Hop booths will be distributed at
Clavel's talk was on the monuments of the conduct of the Hhop is left in while there. He will be detailed there a drawing that will be held at 41
and history of his native town, Toul- the hands of the Hop committee. for one year. o'clock tomorrow afternoon in the
ouse. Regulations for house parties in- reading room of the Union. The draw-
He first showed a few slides of the $clude: house parties shall begin not fing, though scheduled to be held at
modern town, especially in connect- I arierthan Fridav mornin' and end iCleveland Alumni , an earlier date. was nostponed untilI

Boston, Jan. 16.-Percy D. Haug
ton, former Harvard football coa
and now head coach at Columbia ui
versity, said today that .he wou
probably not return to Columbia ne
fall.
"I went to Columbia qn a one ye
basis," Haughton is quoted as sayir
"and there seems to be very liti
chance that I will return."
"All this talk about a three ye
contract is bosh," Haughton add(
"Many things will have to be straigl
ened out before I can agree to i
turn."

WET WET! WET!

"I don't think much of the man
who is not wiser today than he was
yesterday."-Abraham Lincoln. If

Ministry Students
To Hold Lunches
The Monteith club, recently orgar
nA ena c.aA 'n? +ing.z- + onA ant U t

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