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January 12, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-01-12

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WEATHER
AND COLDER
TODAY

boo,

AJW Ar
-A, -A
tr

xil

WESTI
EDITOR

. XXXIV.

No. 79;

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1924

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE,

_.__. ..,.o.__.__.,...,

------------__________________________I________________I_

(ST, NOTED
;R, ARTIST
5 TONIGHT

Colonel Miller Tosses Wet Blanket
On Mr. Bok's Prize Peace Proposal

Is;

0 FAMOUS AS PORTRAIT
INTER 'AND DE┬žIGNER
OF STAGE SETS
LMON TO INTERPRET
H MADE IN FRENCH

"Costume And Personality" Is Subject
Of Address By Distinguished
French Artist
"Costume and Personality" will be'
the subject upon which M. Leon Bakst,
noted artist of the theater and of
dress, will lecture at 8 o'clock tonight
in Hill auditorium as the seventh
number on the Oratorical lecturer
course program for this year.
M. Bakst will speak in French and
Prof. Rene Talamon of the French de-
partment will initerpret from time to
time during the +Ielivery of the lec-
ture. Officials of the Oratorical
association secured the services of
Professor Talamon who has had ex-
perience at several conferences as an
interpreter when it was learned from
M. Bakst that he -preferred to lecture

i

"I have been led to expect a tur- 1 statesmen in their eagerness to make
key dinner and have been offered only improbable another such calamity,
a cafeteria lunch." thoughtlessly hurdled some centur-
Thus does Colonel H. W. Miller, of ies and proposed an organization that
the Engineering ,college, and distin- promises to be in effect a thousand
guished World War Veteran pro- years hence, perhaps sooner, but is
nounce his veridet on the Bok Peace now impracticable.
plan. In the following .he tells why One is perfectly safe in sponsoring
he thinks the plan is of little value.- the League if careful not to suggest
"Ever since I first examined the ap- it for present-day human beings. Our
proved Peace plan I have been won- subconscious minds are still too much
dering what consideration induced influenced by recollection of those
the jury to spend Mr. Bok's hundred times when all that a man possessed
thousand dollars for it. It impresses was acquired only by tremendous toil,
me astadvocating the League of Na- and retained by eternal vigilance to
tions outlined by the 'treaty of Ver- permit us to agree to an organization
sailles, with modifications, of course. that take our neighbor's honesty and
Before one can properly vote upon honor for granted.
the plan it is almost necessary to com-
prehend in some fashion the mental been ae o a aact ye-
processes of the jury in reaching their ventive of diabetes, one winning
decision. We have the verdict but method would have been a treatise on
notEveryreasonng person knows thatI right living. It requires centuries
the world has been drifting to such to educate people to that however,and
an organization as the League since perhais it never canbe doe. Mean-
. .. . while we have insulin."

INDI1CATIONS POINT
TO MODIFICATIONS
OF' MEALLON 'BILL
LONGWORT'II HOLDS CONFERENCE
WITH REPUBLICANS ON
COMMITTEE
CARNER, DEMOCRATHAS
SUBSTITUTE FOR PLAN

KLAN EXTREMISTS
BANISH SIMMONS;
IFORMER EMPERORB

Battle Between Party Leaders
As Probable Outcome Of
Disagreement

Seen

mlan began to think, and will continue
to do so and arrive at that desired
state when and not before, the pro-
cesses of evolution have developed
men's minds to the state or condition
where in they can agree to it, live
satisfactorily under it, and make it a
success. The world suffered such a
calamity in the Great War that our

FRATERNITY LEN TO MEET
TO DISCUSS UNION'S FAIR

This reply to The Daily's announce:-
ment that it would hold an open for-
um in tomorrow's edition is but one
of many. Read what Bates, Dick-
inson, Tilley, Crane, and many others
have to, say onthis all-important
question in, Sunday's issue.

only
costu

t is the greatest authority
d on costume and dress",
)nde Nast publisher of
ne time. M. Bakst has not
.e famous because of his
signing but also because
ait and ballet painting and
.g of stage settings. From
h 1913 M. Bakst was es-
Ave in the painting of bal-
10 he won first medal in
a section at the Universal
Brussels, and in 1911 at
tion Pavillon Marsan at
Louvre). In the following
ainted the ballet, "The
a Faun." These are only

So C'sA TO' CLOSE '
CAMPAIGN TUESDAY'

DUETROITER DONATES p9[9A9 UD

Solicitations
.MIidaight;

Al'il C'ontinume Until'
ToSuspend lWork
1Mflday

Raphael Herman Gives Impetus
N6Y Educational Program
With $25,00

To

stumeg and
the relation
id the parti-
e people for

INS OBJECT
PEACE AWAR

Emporia, ,Kansas, Jan. 11.-(By A.
P.)-"Judges of the American Peace
Award were charged to select a plan
to help America to cooperate with
the world in maintaining peace," Wil-
liam Allen White, a. member of the
Bokjury, told students at the Kansas
State Teachers college today. "The
object was to learn, not how to keep
America out of the world, but. in the
world and at peace with the world,"
The jury felt cooperation could best
be secured in some relationship to the
present machinery of world coopera-!
tion and favored that sort of plan.
The one numbered 1469 seemed best
to carry oi4 the provisions of the
donor's gift.
FORD'S BANK DEPOSITS
IN NY., ONLY $1155000
New York, Jan. 11.-(By A. P.)-
Henry Ford's deposits in New York
banks total only $115,000, it was dis-
closed today when arguments were
heard in the Federal courts on a mo-
tion to attach this amount. The war-
rant was obtained by Sherman Burn-
side, editor of the Jewish Tribune, in
connection with his $200,000 libel suit
against the manufacturer
Counsel for the manufacturer con-
tended that allegations of libel would
have to be proved before the attach-
ment could stand. Judge Knox ord-
ered briefs to be filed Jan. 15.
Washington, Jan. 11.-Foreign ship'
companies are losing money in their
fight against United States Shippin'
Board ships and 'they are expected
soon to agree to cease rate cutting,
Admiral William S. Benson of the
shipping board, yesterday told the
house merchant marine committee.

TEAM SIX RETAINS LEAD
IN COMPETITION FOL CUP
Active solicitation for the Student 4
Christian association's financial drive
will cease at midnight next Tuesday,
it was announced last night by J. S.
DeTar, '25M, chairman of the cam-
paign. No solicitation will be made
Monday but campaigning will con-
tinue until 12 o'clock tonight:. Ali
students working on the drive are
asked to turn in the list of names
given, them as soon as all men listed
have been seen.
The drive has been extended to
Tuesday the chairman asserted, that
a clean-up. squad might be sent to all (
individuals who have not been solici-
ted by then or were in doubt as to
making a subscription. Students d&
sirous of participating in the Cam I
paign to be made by the clean-up
squad Tuesday will be permitted to do
so after notifying DeTar.
Team six, captained by Donald Wil-
liams, '25L, still holds first place, with ,
team two captained by Egbert Isbell,
'26L, and team five captained by Ren-
sis Lickert, '26, second and third, re-
spectively. Competition for the Steph-
ens cu- has increased among the pa--
ticipants of the drive, it was asserted.
Williams was announced to be high
man thus afar with more than $100.1
IHe has also brought in the largest
amount in the subscriptions received
from fraternities. Isbell is second
high man thus far and Daniel Miller,
'25, is lieutenant of the leading sub-
team.
In the fraternity solicitation that
has been made during the last three
(lays the response has been good.
More than $1000 has been obtained.
The subscriptions that willtbe oh-
tained Tuesday will count. in the com-
petition for the trophy.
The Day's News At
The Capitol
I ___ -._____
Sen. James E. Watson, of Indiana
announced he would not seek the Re-
publican presidential nomination.
Director Hines announced a gener-
al reorganization of the administrative;
machinery of the Veterans bureau.
' Agriculture committees of both the
Senate and' House heard pleas for
for the farmers.
A senate sub-committee headed by
Sen. W. E. Borah, was named to con-
duct hearings on Russian recognition.
The House foreign affairs com-
mittee postponed indefinitely action
o ibn rnttuinnvu LU niUiLUI Cf I

CONSIDER FEASABILITY OF a
INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY
San Diego, Calif., Jan. 11.-Raphael
Herman, retired manufacturer of De-
troit is the donor of the $25,000,
award for the best world-wide edu-
cational program looking toward the
development of international peace,
which was announced in San Francis-
co- last fall by the World Wide Feder-
ation of Educational Associations.
Mr. Herman's name was made pub-
lic here Thursday by Milton A. McRae,.
publisher.
Resembles lIok Plan
Under the terms of the contest, the
award is to bepaid to the authors or
authors of the best' plan submitted to
a rommittee of 15 judges, both men
and women. Included in this com-
mittee are Mr. McRae and Alfred
Ducking, Detroit attorney. One half,
the award will be paid when the de-j
cision is made; the other half, when
the plan is put into effect.
It is said that Mr. Herman has off-
ered to be one of several who will
donate $1000,000 for a plan which will
bring about actual world peace. One
of the most prominent projects under
discussion for this award is the es-
tablishment of an international uni-
Iversity, where students picked from'
all the countries of the world would
study the fundamental bases of world
brotherhood. A part of the curri-
culum might consist in travel and
supplementary study in various coun-
tries, with later work at the seat of
the university. Several cities have
been mentioned as possible seats for
such a university among them San,
Diego, The Hague, Barcelona and
Brussels.
Dr. Augustus O. Thomas, president
of the World Federation of Educat-
ional Associations, and commissioner
of education for the state of Maine,
has appointed a committee to look
into the matter of the international
university.
The peace plan award differs from
that of Edward W. Bok in that it con-
templates a plan for world peace,
while the Bok award asks merely for
a plan for America's participation in
an attemn pt for world peace.
The Herman award is open to the
competition of all the world. It calls
for education and not legislation,.ex-
I cept in so far as legislation is needed
to back up the education. The rules
of the contest provide for the sub-.
mission of but one plan by any per-
son or group and the limitation of
each entry to 2,500 words. The con-4
I test closes July 1, 1924.
POFESORWILPLAY
YOUgNG BILIIIOWMARE

Washington, Jan. . 11.-(By AP)-
Realizing that modifications probably
must be made in the Mellon tax bill
if it is to command a majority in the
House, Republican members of the
ways and means committee discussed.
the question todayr with Represent-
ative Nicholas Longworth of Ohio,
party leader.
The conference lasted several hours
but those who participated declined
to disclose what had transpired other
than to say that the discussion had
been general and related solely to
procedure. The several changes in
tax rates, it was said, were not dis-
cussed and no decisions were reached.
Rep. Carner of Texas, ranking Demo-
crat on the committee,. who has a
substitutetfor the delhon plande-
! lared lie was convinced the Repub-
licans were alarmed and were seek-
ing to determine whether "they will
take a licking in the committee or on
the floor."
Mr. Longworth who lead the fight
to have the ways and means com-
mittee report a tax bill by Feb. 11,.
has expressed that there must be a
compromise to meet the demands of
the various elements of the Republi-
can party. Some ;of the party lead-
ers, among them a number of com-
mittee members are of the same be-
lief although some have"I taken the
position thatsthe essentl4 prvisions
of the treasury draft should not be
disturbed.
A9S, [dWI N{ISTRY LOO{ 0MS5
SLondon, Jan 1.-As Labor govern.
ment in Great Britain draws nearer,.
the question of government repre-
sentation in the House of Lords i
arousing more discussion.
In the event the Labor party epmes
into power, kith J. Ramsay MacDon-
aid as Prime Minister, it will have
only one avowed representative in
the second house, the Earl of Lym-
berley, a Socialist.
One spokesman, Labor leaders
agree, would not be nearly enough
and they are casting about for a plan
ito sti ?ngthen the party's power among
the peers.
It Is thought possible Lord Bl ck-
master. Lord Parmour and possibly
Viscount Haldane might accept cab-
,inet posts in a Labor govermennt if
they were tendered them.
The rank and file of the Laborites
oppose creation of Labor peers, caus-
ing leaders to discuss legislation for
amending the present procedure so a
to permit members of the cabinet tc
address either house, or answer ques-
tions in either body.
Such legislation probably would not
provoke serious opposition, since both
the Conservative and Liberal parties
frequently feel handicapped at tb
present necessity of having a propor-
tion of their ministers from the peers
Alumnus Editor I
Of New Monthly
McNaught's monthly, an in depend-
ent review magazine, with V. V. Mc-
Nitt, '01L, as editor: appeared for the
first time this month and has already
gained a large circulation among the
colleges of the country. The editor
announces that the magazine will
I "deal with realities but will be dis-
inclined to take life too pessimistic-
ally."
Among the contributors to its first
issue, the magazine numbers Samuel
G. Blythe, Richard Le Gallienne, Mark
Sullivan, Will Rogers, Dr. Joseph Col-
lins, Frederick Palmer and the car-
toorists Fontaine Fox and R. L. Gold-
berg.

OUSTED HE ADS CALL EXPULSION
DESPERATE COUP OF
RADICAL 'ROUP
CHARGE VIOLATION OF
FOUNDATION PRINCIPLES
Simmons Denies Legality of Sentence;
Will Appeal to Courts If
Necessary
,Atlanta, Georgia, Jan. 11.-(By A
P.)-William Joseph Simmons, found-
er and emperor of the Ku Klux KlanI
and Edward Young Clark, at one timeJ
acting imperial wizard of the organ-
ization, have been banished from the
Klan for their active opposition to the
regime headed by Dr. H. W. Evans
imperial wizard, it was announced
here today in Klan circles. Clark de-
clared, in a statement, he was not
urprised at the developments assert-
ng that "the attempt was made be.
muse Evans and his associates are
lesperate and realize it is only for f
short time that they will be Wle to
hold the reins of the organization an
trample in the dust all the foundation
principles and ideals of the Knights
A the K. K. K.
He declared that neither Dr. Evans
the imperial council, nor the body of
dragoons has the legal right to ban.
'sh himself or Simmonse and asserte
that the "real reason for the attempted
banishment" was an effort to stop the
gathering of Klansmen at the national
congress called to meet in Atlanta
Feb. 26. The Klan official said he
would make a "regular, formal appeal
against the banishment to the order
and then to civil courts if It becomes
necessary."
D1IERSU FAIL TOLOCTE
Portland, England, Jan. 11.-(By A.
P.)--Divers made a number of un-
successful efforts off Portland this af-
ternoon to learn whether an object
located in 30 fathoms of water is the
British submarine L-24 which sank
yesterday after a colision with the
Dreanaught "Resolution." Toinght
there was nothing to give hope that
there would be any survivors among
the members of the crew.
Weymouth, England, Jan. 11.-(By
A. P.)-The British submarine L-24
was sent to the bottom of the sea
yesterday by the dreadnought Resolu-
tion in a collision. The disaster off.
Portland, was similar to one two years
ago, when the K-5.was sunk.
So far as known, all on board the
L-24, 43 in number, perished,
There is a bare possibility, naval
men say, that there may be some sur-
vivors, that is, if the submarine can
be brought to the surface. Depending
upon how the vessel was struck, the
crew may have been able to close the
water-tight compartments. In which
case they might survive for 48 hours.
A court of inquiry will be held
aboard the Resolution today. Salvage
efforts, interrupted by darkness yes-
I terday, were resumed at daybreak.
Tryouts Meet For j
. Spanish Comedy
Tryouts for the annual Spanish
play which will be given March 12 are
Ito be held Monday afternoon at 4
o'clock in room 201, S. W. All those
interested are asked to report to.,Mr.
Mercado at that time.
The play, which is a comedy, is ea-
titled "Dona Carinas."

I -i
IMMIGRATION BlLL
TO REDUCE QUOTAS
House Commission Drafts Measure On
Basis Of Two Percent
In 1890
ANNUAL MINI)MUM INFLUX
PER NATION SET AT 200
Washington, Jan. 11.-(By AP)--
Restriction of immigration into this
country on a basis of two percent of_
the foreign citizens of each country
here in 1890 with an annual minimum
quota of 200 for each nation, was
voted today by the House immigration
commission in drafting a new bill.
The provision in the Johnson bill
providing for admission also of two
percent of the blood relatives of cit-
izens now here was stricken out. A
provision was agreed upon allowing
unrestricted entry of the wives orj
husbands of citizens, their children
under 18 years of age and their moth-
ers and fathers over 65 years of age.
The present law, which expires
June 30, restricts immigration to three
percent of the foreign born of each
nation in 1910. The restriction voted
today would cut by more than half
the present quotas of many countries
affecting most severely the southern
and eastern (countries.
Chairman Johnson indicated the
House would report the bill by next
week.

Representatives of fraternities
and other. campus groups wish-
ing to take part in the Union
Fair which will be held March 7
and 8 ii the Yost Field house
will meet at 4:30 o'clock tomor-
row afternoon in the reading
room of the Union. Each group
wishing to do so may have
charge of a booth at the Fair.
Charles Livingston, '25, will
meet with the representatives at
this time to outline the work
that is to be underaken through
the booths. Livingston has been
made head of this section of the
Fair committee of which John
D. Briscoe, '24E, is general
chairman. Cups will be awarded
after the Fair to the group turn-
ing over the most money and to
the one whose booth is judged'
to be the best.

i
i

FORD'S SOLOFFR
'BEST Y $42000,000
Washington, Jan. 11.-(By A. P.)-
Henry Ford's offer for Muscle Shoals,
the American Farm bureau Federa-
tion declared today, would net the
government $42,000,000 more than the
new offer recently tendered by the
nine principal associated power com-
panies of the southern states.
The statement declared that exam-
ination of the two offers disclooed that
Ford would pay a total of $130,626,0001
over a 50-year period whereas the
power companies would pay but $87,-
'800,000.
"This so called offered of $100,000,-
000 becomes, upon investigation,
neither a bona fide- offer nor is it a
payment of $100,000,000," said Ray Sil-
ver, Washington representative. "It.
is merely.a suggestion that, these al-
lied power companies may subscribe
enough to pay 4 per centinterest on
the cost of the Wilson dam."
Iota Sigma Pi Elects Officer
Margaret Woodwell, grad., has beenj
elected vice-president of Iota Sigma'
Pi, honorary chemical sorority, to
succeeed Ellen Porter, grad., who is
leaving the University at the end ofN
the semester.

OUT LANSING
IN, FINAL P1
FIRST HOME GAME OF
INITIATES NEW YO
FIELD HOUSE
TWO I'EAMS STANI
J1-13 AT END Of
Haggerty Accounts for NJ
of Michigan Total; Ni
Stars for Aggies
In the first basketball a
played in the new Yost field
the opening home game of t
Michigan's Varsity court f
out the Michigan Aggies by
23-19, last night.
The Wolverines had no
defeating the East Lansin
and it was only in the last
utes of play that Coach Mat
teges were able to come thin
the winning counters.
Game Hard Fough
Michigan started off the
drawing first blood when Ch
ped in a free throw. Hag
lowed this with a shot fror
before the Aggies could g
Nuttilo counted first for M.
a moment later added a secc
after Kipke had scored from
From that time on the rea
the period was nip and
both teams gaining the 1
single point or two only to
opponents come through wi
basket. The Wolverines t1
Farmers until the last mini
period when they tied it ui
The Maize and Blue five s
strong in the second half a
a six point lead in the firsi
utes of play when Deng ca
of field goals, one on a hoz
and Klpke added another.
ed the Varsity scoring for
and the Agges again bega

man ana mtto until they- r
tie at 18 all.
Haggerty Stars
Here Michigan again took
Haggerty shot a nice one
floor and Kipke tossed in a fr
Just as the final whistle
diminutive Haggerty scored
point from the foul line.
Michigan's play appeared
off color especially in finding
ket. Upon many occasions
sity would carry the ball I
floor by means of some f
work only to miss an easy
the netting.
George Haggerty was hij
man of the game with four fI
and one free throw to his c
was closely followed by Na
M. A. C. who proved the ou
man on his team. The fast A
ward counted three goals
field and also two free tI
an eight point total. Deng a
were responsible for most of
points scored by the Wolver
men having a total of five
their credit.
MICHIGAN
FG
Haggerty. .............4
Deng. .... ............2
Birks .................0.
Kipke.................2
Cherry................0
Morgaridge ............0

Total

... . . . . ........
m. A. FC.
F'G

Double Quartet Choir Of TempleI
Beth El Will Sing Here Tomorrow

-*

PAGE SHEBA

William Howland, formerly of the
voice department of the University
School of Music for many years and
now associated with the Detroit In-
stitute of Musical Art, will direct the
double quartet choir of the Temple
Beth El of Detroit which will sing;
here at the University services at be I
held at 7:30 o'clock, tomorrow night'J
in Hill auditorium.
The musical program which will
be rendered has been arranged by Dr.
Leo M. Franklin of Temple Beth El,
Detroit and is more extensive than any
of the musical programs thus far off-
ered at these services. Rabbi)

bass and also director; Edwin Kemp,
bass; and A. R. Tyler, organist.
The ritual responses will be given
by Tyler with the hymns "Borchu"
and "Shma Yisroel", and also, by
Rogers with the hymns, "Who Is Like
Unto Thee," and "Kedusha." Tyler"
will also interpret the selection, "Va-
anachu." The choir response to the
benediction will be "Grant Us Thy
Peace", which has been arranged from
Schubert by Mr. Howland. The
double quartet choir will sing, "Re-
joice in the Lord" by Balakireff and
! "The Lord is in His Holy Temple"a
I and the ladies quartet will sing,
I "Father Almighty," by Brahms.

Nuttilo................3
Richards....... 0
Kitto ................1
Eva ............ ......0
Hultman.. ............0
Mason...............0
Ralston....... ... . 0
Hackett...............0
Total .... ..........
BRTISH SHIT SPET[
Nondon, Jan. 11.-(By AP
British government is taking n
ial action concerning the as
ations at Speyer, it was lear:
night nor is it making any pro
IHowever the government is
discussions with the French
ment on the question of autov
the Palatinate and has asked
impartial inquiry be instituted
Allied High Commission. The
atists decrees which were t
I become operative tomorrov

YE2, I'M A BLOODHOUND
Found.

on a resoiution to ,prohII sate of
war material to foreign countries. Prof. Harry C. Carver, of the math-
ematics department, said to be one of
Chairman Smith of the Senate In- the foremost billiard players of the
terstate Commerce committee issued city, will -meet Harold Wirsing, 131
a statement urging cooperation to re- I years old, of Flint, junior champion ofI
duce excessive freight rates. ; the worh in a tournament at 7:301

Spaulding House
Again Fire Victim
Fire broke out for the second time
in two days in Spaulding house, 1022

A. hejd on the1
icg. "I ain't got

boulevard sing-
no body"-Yes

I

I.

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