100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

THE WEATHER
SNOW AND COLDER
TODAY

LL

Ar Ar,
AlWfIt r t alt

aiI

LEA

WESTERN C(
EDITORIAL AS

VOL. XXXIV. No. 77 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1924 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE

HEAD OF POWERIFUL
SEAT EMM/TEE
SMITH CHOSEN CHAIRMAN OF
INTERSTATE COMMERCE
GROUPS
INSURGENTS COMBINE
TO DEFEAT CUMMINS
Defeated Senator Expected To Retain
Place In Group Dealing With
Railroad Legislation

Christian Impresses Hearers
At First Organ. Recital Here

Palmer ,Christian,. playing the first
of the twilight organ recitals yester-
day afternoon in Hill auditorium, made
a profound impression upon his hear-
ers at ;this, his initial appearance as,
University organist. Though not yetl
entirely familiar with the instrument,1
he pays with a consistent ease andl
composed deliberation.
A remarkably flexible finger tech-
nique is his, and a touch that is pre-
eise yet independent, while in all hil'
playing there is always a dominating
intelligence. His intepretations ex-
hibit an inspiring rhythmic sense, and
a conception of tone values with an
ability to keep his themes obvious and
yet maintain a balance of volume.
His program was of varied style
and calibre, and of rather general in-
terest. Hollins' Concert Overture
which led the program, was alive with
a variety of color, and seldom muddyl
in spite of rigid technical demands.-

A choral of religious mood by
Fauchnet was performed with majestic
bearing and considerable feeling
while a charming old French Toccata
trilled along on the piccolo with a de-
lightful presto. Mr. Christian's own
attractive.earrangement of Greig's
Nocturne was played with gentle feel:-
ing, and employed a variety of organ
effects. Wagner's pompous and spirit-
ed March from Tannhauser concluded
the recital.
The audience at first seemed hesi-
tant in its praise, but at the end re-
called Mr. Christian to. the platform
several times. It will douftless fol-
low with the success of this first re-
cital, that Mr. Christian's appearances
in the future will be received with in.
creasing interest by an increasing
number of people. The late arrival of
a considerable part of the audience'
resulted in some confusion during
the concert, which began on time.
R. A. H.

BELIEVE IT UNWISE TO COMMIT
PARTY TO BILL ENACTMENT
AT THIS SESSION
SOLDIERS BLOC UNSURE
AS TO TACTICS TO USE
Ways and Means Committee Proceeds
With Consideration of Tax
Measure

wAYT MARK
PRO GRAM OF BAND
BOUNCE TONIGHT

Doctor Reports
i Donahue Better

HAWAIIAN SONGS, PIANO"
CORNET TO FEATURE
ENTERTAINMENT

AND

VARSITY MUSIGIANS TO
PLAY POPULAR PIECES

The condition of Howard A. Dona-
hue, '24, ex-managing editor of The
Daily, although still serious, is show-
ing some lmproven~ent according to
Dr. Fred J. Drolett, of Lansing in a
personal interview with a Daily re-
porter. Dr. Drolett, who is Donahue's
family doctor has been attending the
ex-editor since the evening of Jan.
1.
No official confirmation of reports
circulated in Detroit papers yester-
day alleging misconduct on the part
of the student editor could be obtain-
ed. The stories carried in The Daily
regardingDonahue's illness have been
based on reports from Dr. Drolett and
Donahue's family.
MEXICO TO LAUNCH
ATTACK ON'-REBELS3

Receipts Will Be Used To
Debt From Wisconsin
Trip

wACE DELIVER
LECTURE AB NIN

Clear

Washington, Jan. 9.-A Democrat,
Allison D. Smith, of South Carolina,
was elected today by the senate as
chairman of its interstate commerce
committee, one of the ranking com-
mittees of the new Republican con-
gress. Four insurgent Republicans
and the two farmer labor senators
threw their support to Smith, thus not
only breaking a dead-lock which has
existed since December. 10, but also
giving the country convincing, mani-
festations that their control of the
balance of power in the senate is as
complete as that of the Republican
insurgents in the house.
On the 32nd and final ballot of the
deadlock Albert D. Cummins, of Iowa,
who had the endorsement of the Re-
publican organization for reelection,
received only 29 votes as against 39
for Smith and 6 for Senator Couzens,
Republican, Michigan,twho had been
the third choice of the insurgents..
Smith received only one 'vote, more
than the necessary majority of the 74
senators voting.
With the deadlock broken, organ-.
ization of the 68th congress is com-
plete, except for an expected fight
over the office of senate president'
pro-tem.
The situation as to this matter was
somewhat obscure tonight. Senator
Cummins is without the endorsement
of the Republican party conference
for this place, as party leaders have
held an election to be unnecessary-
With the Iowa senator deposed from
the chairmanship of .the committee!
which handles railroad legislation the j
insurgents have indicated that they
would support him for reelection as
president pro-tem, but there have
been rumbhlings of some opposition
from, the Republican organization.
Whether Senator Cummins remains
as a member of the inter-state com-
merce committee, which handles rail-
road legislation, was questioned to-
day in the senate by some of the in-
surgents. Republican organization
leaders hold, however, that he is a
member despite his defeat for the
chairmanship.
DRI.NK AND YOU ON'T
DANCE-IF AT CORWtLL
Ithaca, N. Y., Jan. 9.-Co-eds at
Cornell university refuse to danceT
with men who have even a faint smell
of liquor.
Ilieut. Theo. H. Tweston, Univer-
sity proctor, in a statement today
said:
"I believe there is less drinking at
Cornell than in any other large uni-
versity in the country. This, I think
is due largely to the activities of the
girls, who have refused to dance with
a man who has even a faint smell of
at Cornell and be in good standing
liquor about him. No man can drink
socially.
"The girls have banded together, re-
fusing to permit drinking at any so-
cial function, and have boycotted men
from their parties who have infringed
on this rule."

PEIP MEETING WILUCEVLAN RBB
'PE[N TRACK YETAR ',TO SPEAK SUNDAY,
Seven Speakers To Usher In Season Subject of Dr. Silver's Sermon To Be
At Gathering Tuesday "The Triumph and Failure
Night of Democracy"
---.-.
FORMAL CALL FOR TRYOUTS WILlIAM HOWLAND TO DIRECT
FOR SQUAD WILL BE GIVEN DETROIT CHOIR AT SERVICES
Seven speakers will usher in the Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver of the
track season at a pep meeting to be Community center at Cleveland will
held next Tuesday night in Natural be the principal speaker at the Uni-
Science auditorium when the formal versity services to be held at 7:30
o'clock Sunday evening in Hill audi-
call for tryouts will be given. All torium. The subject of Rabbi Silver's;
students interested in track are urged talk will be, "The Triumph and the
to come out at this time and listen Failure of Democracy." Coming here
to these men on the sport. for the first time, the Rabbi is said te
The list of speakers includes Coach be one of the most prominent speakers,
Steve Farrell, Prof. Clarence T. John- ever here.
ston, of the surveying department and After graduating from the Univer-I
member of the Board in Control. of sity of Cincinnati and the Hebrew
Athletics, Coach George Little, Trainer Union College in 1915, le became
Hoyt, freshman track coach, Prof Rabbi at the Community center in
Harry C. Carver, of the mathematics Cleveland at the age of 24. He has
,department and Igert R. Isbell, '24I., f been the instigator in the construe-1
last years' Varsity two-miler. tion of a new church edifice which is
Last year Michigan won two Wes- now being built in Cleveland and that
tern Conference championsihps in is planned to be the largest in the
track, the Varsity team piling up a country, of which he will also become-
majority of points in both the indoor Rabbi.
and utdoor meets. .Michigan's team . Rabbi L. M. Franklin of the. Temple
then went to Chicago in June and won Beth El at Detroit has been making
the National Intercollegiate track arrangements for the musical pro-
meet, competing against represent- gram of the University services for
atives of the country's largest uni- .the past few months and will bring
verisities. Coach Farrel is hoping to here the double quartet choir of the,
repeat again this season with the. Temple.
support of the student body. Dr. Franklin will read the ritualw
Arthur 0. Graves, '24, track man- service. He is also the supervising
ager, is chairman of the pep meeting. Rabbi of the University Jewish si u-I
Speaking of the affair he says, "Great dent congregation. Leo Franklin, '24
interest was stimulated among the will att as the presiding officer.e
students in track last year due to
Michigan's winning three champion-j
ships. 'his interest should be even
ation for the Olympic games to be held
next summer. We are asking you to AT1MEETINGLASTNIGHT
support the team by coming out for 1 -
the pep meeting next Tuesday night.
The entire student body is urged to at- 1first steps in the organization of.a
t"Mi higan's fist indoor track meet' University unit of the Naval Reserve
.ichg' .force was taken last night at the
this year l be track hen a rkin Union when Ensign Russel Dodd, '2'EF
Manyof he tackmen re orkig irecently.. appointed commanding offi-
out already in Waterman gymnasiumy
The meets this year will be held' in ..er of the unit spoke to the 75 or more,
the Yost field house which will easily men who gathered there. He ex-}
seat the entire student body. plained the requirements, purposes,#
and other matters pertaining to the
naval unit.
At the conclusion of the meeting ov-
er 30 men signed applications for en-
trance into the force and some took
FECL Tthe required physical examination
-for entrance.

Washington, Jan. 9.-Republican I Hawaiian sor
leaders of the house not only are op- skit, a cornet s
posed to consideration of the Soldiers' of light and pop
bonus ahead of tax legislat on, but be- sity Band will
lieve it unwise to commit house Re- for the annual,
publicans to the enactment of a bonus will be given a
I bill at this session of congress. in Hill auditorii
f This attitude became known today Tradition is
as bonus foes and friends perfected the band. The
their plans for tomorrow night's party ) opener of every
conference on taxation and the bonus. ed this year as
At the same time the revenue ques-i varied program
tion bobbed up in the senate, half a lection from "I
dozen senators joining in the discus- caprice, the "W
sion. will be the fir
On the house side, members of the program. The
Republican soldier bloc, who had had Ia march, "Hail
tomorrow -night's conference calledf a flower song,
with the avowed purpose of bringing Rose", by Trin
about a showdown on the bonus, were Army", by Moor
undecided, in the face of opposition the Hawaiians
of organization leaders to their plans, struments assist
as to what tactics they would employ. '20 one of thec
The group had intended to offer a Union Opera "
resolution instructing the ways and will entertain v
means committee to report the Mc- guitars.
Kenzie bonus bill ahead of the tax "The Ghost W
measure, now under committee con- a march "The P
sideration. Announcement by Repre- Blue" by Garne
sentative Longworth, the Republican !by a cornet solo
leader, that he would counter with a I of M., "Culver P
proposal that before taking up the I The Stanchfield
bonus question and his confidence that D.'will present t
he would have enough.vottes to, ap- "What They Ain'
prove this program was followed to- will close the pi
day by the statement by some mem- The annual Bc
bers of the war veterans groups that to clear the debt
they might not carry out their orig- Wisconsin trip..
inal intentions. trip is $100. In
The ways and means 'ommittee running expense
proceeded with its consideration of raised by mean
the tax bills, administrative features night.
today, without making any material
changes in the treasury draft. Chair-,
man.Green said that tomorrow a vote
would be taken as to whether his res-
olution, proposing a constitutional
amednment to prohibit issuance of
tax exempt securities, should be fav-
orably reported..

ngs, a unique piano
olo, and a full program
ular music by the Var-
compose the program
Band Bounce which
t 7:30 o'clock tonight
ium.
flaunted this year by
Victors, time honored
Band Bounce, is plac-
the last number of the
. Instead , of it a se-
Aida" by Verdi and a
histler and His Dog",
st group to open the
second group will be
Michigan" by Pixel,
"The Romance of the
kaus, and "The Bum
e. Tang and Tavares,
with their oriental in-
ted by H. B. Wagner,
soloists with the 1920
Top O' the Morning"
with their steel string
alk ' by Salisbury and
Men of the Maize and
tzky will be followed1
by Arnold Berndt, S.
olka", by Steinheuser.
brothers, Rex and A.
heir piano kit entitled
t, Isn't." The Victors
rogram.
ounce is held this year
outstanding since the
The deficit from that
addition the ordinary
es of the Band will be
s of this concert to-
UR T UNION

Major

Offensive Will

Be DirectedI

Against Guaualajara
Forces
OBREGON LEAVES TO GIVE
ADVANCE SIGNAL IN PERSON
Washington, Jan. 9.-A major of-
fensive against the Guaualajara reb-
els in Mexico is to be launched at
once by the Obregon forces, the Mex-
ican embassy here said in a statement
today outlining the military situation
in Mexico..
"President Obregon," the statement#
said, "left Mexico City this morning
for Iratuato to pe-aonally give the
signal for the advance. The l attack
will be against every unit of the rebel
army under General Estraba and it
will be the plan of the federal forces
to deal a decisive blow. Troops, mu-,
nitions and planes have been massed
about Iratuato for several days In
preparation for the drive'.
"Simultaneously an offensive willr
be launched on the East front (the
Vera Cruz rebels under General
Fanchez). Here, too, elaborate prep-
arations have been made to strike a
decisive blow. Desperate efforts have
been made by the Vera Cruz rebels to
interrupt communications between
Mexico City and the north so as to
delay troop movements of loyal fed-,
eral units from various states.
ANOCEAPPOINTMENT,
OF FROIC COMMITTEES

SUTHERN CGMPANIES
IMAKE 'SHOALS OFFER

Washington, Jan. 9.-An entirely
new offer to the government for the
electric power to be developed at
Muscvle Shoals tendered today by
nine of the principal asociated power
companies of the southern states as-!
sured a reopening of that much con-
troverted subject before Congress. At
the same time it assures a re-examin-
ation of the pending offer by Henry I
Ford.
SBriefly, the new offer proposed to
pay the government $100,000,000 rent-
al over a period of 50 years, and still
leave the government in possession
of the property.'
It contemplates taking only the
hydro-electric energy to be develop-
ed by the Wilson dam in 1925 and
leaving the nitrate plant free to the
government for production of mun-f
itions in war, and for the productioni
of fertilizer in time of peace. Be-
side that the offer proposes to re-
serve for production of fertilizer a
block of the electric power to be!
developed on the dam.

Fraternities and organizations will
be given a last chance to obtain booths
for the 1925 J-Hop that will be held
Feb. 8 from 2 to 3 o'clock tomorrow
in the main lobby of the Union..
More than 40 booths were applied
Zor yesterday. While there are 6"
be disposed of, the large number of
fraternites waiting to make appli-
cation until disputes over tickets have
been setled make it necessary that
those wishing booths sign immediate-
ly. Drawing to determine the lo-
cation will take place within a few,
days.
A general meeting of independents
going to the Hop who wish to go in-
to groups to obtain booths will be
held at 4 o'clock tmorrow afternoon In
the reading room of the Union. All
independents who have not made
other arrangements for booths are
asked to be present.
ARVARD0, PRINCETON,
CHICAGO WIN GAMES

'ENSIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS
PAYABLE THIS AFTERNOON
Office hours to receive cash
payment for the Michiganen-
sian applications will be from
2 to 5 o'clock every afternoon.
Payments should be made at the
busniess department of the pub-
lication. The price of this year's
book is $5.00)

NOTED ARCHAEOLOGIST 6
HISTORY OF DISCOVRIE!
IN MYCENAE
IS GIVING SPEECHES
THROUGHOUT COUN'
Slides Of Excavations, Fortr
Shown To Collaborate Wit
Homer's Writings
Alan J. B. Wace, director of
British School of Archaeology
Athens, delivered a University
ture yesterday afternoon in Na
Science auditorium upon "Pr-hi
Greece: A. Stu dy in Archaeolo
Reconstruction."
In ,his lecture which was Illus
ed by slides, Mr. Wace showed
many discoveries through excava
in Mycenae have given proof tc
writings of Homer. He gave the
tory of the excavations in that
and the results that have been ob
ed. \The work, began by men
famous through it, Is at present
caried on to a great extent by
British school at Athens, of whine
is head.
Shows Slides
Slides of the country, the an
graveyard of the fortress, wals,
the fortification itself were show
addition to several wl~ich sho
tombs and relics found in them,
ing from 14 to 15 B. C. Many insi
es were pointed' out where the
coveries definitely co-laborated
writings of the ancient Greek :
Homer.
Mr. Wace, who is touring the c
try under the auspices of the Ii
national Institute of Education, is
ing lectures at many universities
colleges in America. He is to s
in Toledo today.
Heads Athens School
The speaker hs been educate
Pembroke college, Cambridge
versity and at the British school
Archaeology in Athens and R
He assumed the diroctorship of
Athens school In 1914. SInce-hat
he has becone reotg ized a on
the foremost of modern archaeolog
Mr. Wace was a fellow of ]
broke college. from 1904 to 1913,
is at present a fellow of St. J
college, Cambridge university. F
also a member of the council of
Hellenic society at the present
and a corresponding member of
Imperial German Archaeological
stifute. This is his first trip to
erica.
Cleveland Actors
To Offer Satl
The Michigan Repertory the
which will be remembered for its
sentation in October of "The Moll
and "Mixl Marriage", is offe
"March Hares", a fantastic satir
three acts by Harry Wagstaff Gri
on Wednesday, January 23rd,
The company consists entirely
picked actors from' the Clel
Playhouse and is of uniform ex
ence. Two more plays will be g
here by this organization, "Anne
ersdotter" by Wiers Jenssen in
ruary and "Man and Superman
George Bernard Shaw in March.
Reserved seats for the series
now being sent out 'to all holdei
patron and subscribing membei
cards. A few seats for the grou
plays may still be obtained by ca
J. W. Glover, Jr., 620 Oxford ,
Tel. 1140.
World Court Is
DebateSubj
Alpha Nu Debating society will
its second regular meeting of the
at 7:30 o'clock tonight in the A
Nu room on the fourth floor of Un
city hall. The subject fr debate
be "Resolved, That the United S
shouldpoin the world court." Vis
are invfted to .speak after the de
The Alpha Nu. group picture fo

o'clock Saturday afternoon at S
Michiganensian will be taken a
ding's studio. All members are. a
to be present.
DAILY TO HOLD OPEN FORU
ON BOK WORLD PEACE PLA
In an effort to cooperate
the referendum, being underta
en by the American Peace Awa
in order to allow the people
make known their approval
disapproval of the prize win
,Doalfor, wonrl a

rxr
I

Paris, Jan. 9.-A tidal wave and
storms today wrought havoc along
the French Atlantic coast from 'Fin-
isterre to the Basque country. A
number of lives were lost and im-
mense material damage resulted.
Reports from Biarritz, Quinter,
Saint Malo, Parane, La Rochelle, and
Les Sables d'Olonne on the Bay of
Biscay, indicate that all these places
were hard hit by the elements. Dis-
patches from St. Nazaire say that du r-
ing the height of the storm which
was between 2 o'clock this morning
and 5 o'clock, numerous small boats
were thrown against the walls of the
embankment and destroyed. At Les
Sables d'Ollone a number of vessels
were torn from their anchorages.
One, a fishing boat, was sunk and its
crew of six men perished.I
The storm raged throughout. today.
Several wireless appeals from the sea
were received at Brest, One of these
came from the , steamer Tasmania,
which was in trouble in Lat. 47 min,
18 sec. and 7 min. 13 sec. longitude.
The message failed to make known
which of the several steamers of that
name needed aid.

Ensign Dodd explained that all men
who enlisted without previous experi-
ence would be classed either as sea-
men second class in the deck division,
or firemen, third class in the engin-
eer division. Those men who enlist-
ed will be required to attend an hour
and a half drill period each week at
which time the fundamentals of navi-
gation and some of the more elemen-
tary facts of seamanship will be
taught to the new men. Later in the
year they will have an opportunity
to practice rifle marksmanship on
the government range at Ypsilanti.
During the summer the men will be
given, an oportunity Hof taking a cruise
on the Great Lakes at which time they
will receive the full stipend of their
rank.
Those men who have signed appli-
cationi for enlistment; and who did
not take the physical examination may
take it at 1 o'clock Saturday at the
Union. Further enrollments will be
taken at the Wednesday night drill
periods which begin next week.
These periods will begin at 7:30
o'clock.

Pro:. J. G. Winters, of the Latin
department gave an illustrated lecture,
last night in room D of Alumni Mem-
orial hall, choosing as his subject
"Ancient and Modern Rome."
"Ancient nd Modern Rome."

.

Playing at Cambridge, Harvard last
night defeated the Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology on the basket-
ball court by a score of 26-16. Prince-
ton defeated Vermon 28-19.
In the West Chicago beat North-
western at Evanston, 26-18. The
game was featured by the playing of
Alyea, Chicago right forward, who by
his speed and accurate shooting gain-
ed more than half of the Maroons
points.

WISDOM
"Wisdom is knowing what to do
next, skill is knowing how to do
it, 'and virtue is doing it." If you
want to sell, buy or find some

Announcement of the appointment
of committees for the 1927 Frosh
Frolic was made last night by Mark
H. ,Harrington, '27E, general chairman
of the Frolic.
Arthur Lee, '27E and Marguerite
Monroe, '27 will compose the finance
committee. The committee for select-
ing the orchestras will be Alvin Tolle,
'27, Arthur Rich, '27E and Fred
Shillito, '27. Publicity will be handled'
j by Harold Hauf, '27E, Wallace Hall,
'27E and Joseph Harley, '27, the decor-
ations by Marguerite Monroe, '27,j
George Heston, 1'27 and Harold Hauf,
'27E. Programs will be in, charge of
Wallace Hall, '27E, Arthur Rich, '27E,I
and George Heston, '27, refreshments1
of Earl §hillito, '27, Joseph Harley,
'27, and Alvin Tolle, '27.
COMEDY CLU ILGIVE
.TWO PLAYSWITH MUSIC!
Comedy Club will present two one-
act plays at 8 o'clock tonight in Sarah
4 Caswell Angell hall, "The Key" by
Franz Molnar and "At the Hawk's
Well" by William Butler Yeats. This
is the first time that these plays have
been produced in this country. Spec-
ial musical accompaniment has been
arranged.
Marion Miller, '24, has the leading
role in, "At the Hawks Well." Miss
jMiller studied under Ruth St. Denis
and Ted Shawn and is an accomplish-
jed dancer.
The club will repeat their perform-,
ance Friday by invitation of the Ypsi- -
lanti Players at their theatre 'in Ypsi-
lanti.
Classes To Give
Program Tonight
Play production classes will present
their next program at 8 o'clock tonight
in University hall. This is one of a
series of entertainments being given
by the members of classes during the

Glee Club To Make Radical
Changes InComing Programs
Policies unlike those pursued in 'to be attempted is to be of a much
former years and a radical change in higher calibre it will not be ultra
the type of music and program to be classical Mr. Bowen, in planning the
attempted. this year were announced program, has left considerable room
yesterday by George Oscar Bowen for groups of college songs, an organ
director of the University Glee club solo, baritone group solos, two groups
Believing that the higher calibre and by the Varsity quartette, and probably
standard which the club hopes to es- a banjo quintette, as well as a string-
tabish in its coming concerts of thej ed group of the chamber music var-
year will prove a strong factor in iety. From the standpoint of the men
making the club a more important in the organization, Mr. Bowen be-
campus activity as well as a value to I lieves they are more interested in the!
the University, Mr. Bowen believes The Glee club will be heard in con-

Ann Arbor Art Association Meets
Opening the new exhibition of paint-
inaa of WPlA~a~vrn n f.-ancn of TrP1nn

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan