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September 30, 1923 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1923

MLQ&UGAN, DAILY

IGNORANCE enhasser, Tom Paine, and Renan ought
(Continued from Page Fiat) to prcedite every text book.
The University advocates the read- The reading of novels should, fur-
ing of Ruskin and Pater and Conrad thermore, be denounced. It is a waste
and Browning; but that is tot well, o ftime; because an uneducated mind
cnieh because the students are not seldcimL reads a novel with any other
prepared to read them. Ruskin is not ointrrest than in the story, or the char-
valuable until one is able to disagree acters. Ideals ought always to be
with him; and Ruskin is an altogeth- gtis precedence. The history of the
er too subtle writer to be administered w)rlii is a history of ideas. It is
to young minds. In brief, lie is too thsrough ideas that one most efficient-
satisfying. Why not make Rey de ly becomes acquainted with personali-
tourimont compulsory, or place Baron ties and the invisile authors of books
d'Iolbach at the head of the reading are the best acuaintances we can find.
list? Then, maybe criticiitsm wtoul 1We can miako them part of us. It is
begin. I believe that Giacomo Leo- only the exceptional man who can
pardi, I. L. Atencken, Saiamuel Butler. hiisf be a persoiiality; but there is
Friolrich Nietesche, Boccalini, Schop- (Continued on Page Seven)

ROSES
The ideal fragrance of roses which will never be gathered
THE POPLARS
Flakes lav in the air, the whitish noslar flowers
THE GIRDLE
Art desires that nude women should be adorned with a girdle
THE PLAYING WATERS
The playing waters I' look at always fall again
THE DRONE
I would be a large drone, all velvet, which plunges and disappears
'in the bell of a foxglove
THE MARIGOLD
- In this yellow distaff, she amuses herself by planting right in the center
of the forehead a large golden marigold
THE BEE
Then suddenly the bee was silent and with calmed wings drank the life
of the Hunan flower
THE MOORS
I divert words from their streamn as one diverts streams to throw them
athwart the barrenness of the moors where frail and pallid ideas blossom
badly
THE SWAN
When she lifted one of her arms to stay the fan, one would have said a
swan from the depths of the water draws up and shakes her flexible and.
white neck
THE HAL S
It would be better to have kissed only pure hands
THE BARGE
I wish to-springunto anothervessel and to have the old bhrge sink
with all my sins.
PERFUMES
The perfume of lavender and nuts untroubled by male touch
THE LAMB
And its name is Lamb
THE CHESTNUT TREES
The grass is soft and deep around the chestnut trees
THE DREAM
I regret the dream I had dreamed of love
THE FAN
It is a magical fan.. This little thing changes into a woman at
the prayer of a man of good-will, that is all
- THE LAUREL BUSH
If I had met Appollo, I should not have changed into a fig-tree.
Into a laurel bush?
What does it matter?
THE JUGGLER
Inimitable juggler, hair! . . . How artfully you cheat life
LEAVES
Oh! how my life is shedding its leaves
CLOUDS
Beams of light are passing, clouds are passing, There are arabesques on
the walls
THOUGHTS
Thoughts are made to be thought and not to be acted
Chapter Headings from "The Horses of Diomedes" by Remy de Gourmont.
SEVEN COME
"The whole of life is a nenormous accident-a dice-throw of eternity in
the vapors of Jime and space. Why not then, with him we love by our side,
make richer and sweeter the nonchalant gaiety of our amusement, in the
great mad purposeless preposterous show, by the "quips and cranks" of a
companionable scepticism; canvassing all things in earth and heaven, rever-
encing God and Caesar on this side of idolatory, relishing the foolish, fooling
the wise and letting the world drift on as it will."
From "Suspended Judgments" by John Cowper Powys.

For Most
Delicious Lunches
with~
Pleasant Surroundings
Tuttles Lunch Room
338 Maynard St. South of Majestic

Freshmen
Start right. Get your M
book and begin pasting
football pictures in it.
Both can be had at
]Lyndon a,, Co-.
619 ~. ~ilerety

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