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January 09, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-01-09

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THE WEATHER
LIGHT SNOW; CLOUIDt
AND IWARMER

Y. r

Lie, I.

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att

ASSOCIJ
LEASED) V

WESTERN CO
EDITORIAL AS

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VOL. XXXIV. No. 76 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1924 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, Fr

REPUBLICANS HOPE"
TO PUSH QUESTION
OF TAX REDUCTION
HOUSE LEADERS AIM TO VOTE
ON MELLON PLAN BEFORE
BONUS COMES UP
WILL HOLD CONFERENCE
THURSDAY ON PROBLEM
Longworth, )J;, rity IrQad, Peeves
Those Favoring Priortty For
Bonus Beateu

Talamon To Translate Lecture
Of Bakst, Noted French Artist

A unique experience will be given
an Ann Arbor audience Saurday night
when Prof., Rene Talamon of the
French department will act as trans-
lator to Leon Bakst, noted French
costumer and artist, who is scheduled:
to speak on "Costumes and Person-
a'ity" as the seventh number on the
Oratorical lecture course program for
this season.
Leon Bakst will give his lecture in
French and Professor Talamon will
interpret after every few sentences.
Professor- Tal-amon has had a varied
exper ience as an interpreter having
served as one at the Washington Dis-

armament conference and the Versail-
les Peace conference at Pade.
As was announced yesterday, Leon
Bakst's lecture will be illustrated
with paintings, lantern slides, and var-
led costumes which he l4as designed
It was decided that the lecture
would be given in French when word
was received recently from Leon
Bakst stating that he preferred to I
speak in French because of his brok-
en English. Following the receipt of
that letter, officials of the Oratorical
association immnediately became yin
touch with Professor T alamon and se-
cured his servfees.

SOTERIENTACTS
TO. MAKE COOUID6E
TREASURY SENDS INSTRUCTIONS
TO BORDER ENFORCEMENT
OFFICIALS
EMBARGO ON MUNITIONS
IS MADE BY 1AAILROADS
Shipments of War Equipment Can Be
MAhdA Only With Approval of
Government Agency

Washington, Jan. 8-(By A.P.)-
Confidence was expressed today by re-
publican leaders of the house that
they would be able to press a tax re-
duction to a vote before action Is had
on the soldiers' bonus.
Opposed to giving priority to th'
bonus-a question expected to come to
a showdown at a conferexice of lioise
republicans Thursday night, Long-
worth the majority leader notified the
group of former service men who are.
demanding a vote on adjusted coni-
pensation ahead of tax legislatio that
no effort would be made .to dodge the
issue.
For an hour Mr. Longworth was in
conference with Representatives
Johnson, of South Dakota, Fish of New
York, and Andrew of .Massa'chusetts,
who were active in having the con-
ference called. He told them that "we
have you beaten and will show you
Thursday night."
The discussion was had after it had
been announced at the White louse
that President Coolidge. was in hearty
support of the plan to give- a tax leg-
islation right of way over the bonus
At the same time, a white .house
spokesman in discussing the tax slt.-
uation said the. president considered
that the surtax schedule earried it
the .Garner, democrat,. substitute for
the Mellon bill would tend to discour-
age the investment of capital in -busi-
ness enterprises rather than In tax
exempt securities.
0,
A number of noel feture acts
have eeh'l placed on the program of
the Varsity Band Bounce which will
be held at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
Hill Auditorium. All the performers
are experienced entertainers and have
been :se'ected beca'dse of their ability
after several tryouts.
Perhaps one of the most' unusual
numbers is that of the double .piano
musical 'skits which will be given by
the Stanchfield brothers. The per-
formance of the famliar Tang and Ta-
vares the Hawaiians, who will again
entertain, assisted by H. B. Wagner
'20, one of the soloists with the Un-
ion Opera "Ttop of the Morning", and
a cornet solo by Arnold Berndt, School
of Music, a recently acquired per,
former discovered by Captain Wilfred
Wi'son, will constitute the -lighter
number of the program.
STATE RLEASESFUNDS
fOR MEDICAL BUIDIN
ansing, Jan. 8.-The state adminis-!
tratige board today authorized the
auditor general to honor vouchers for
the completion of the medical build-
ing at the University of Michigan, not
to exceed the balance of $183,776 re- I
maining in the appropriation for the
fiscal year.
The action authorizes the university
to go ahead with constracts of con-
structions work within the limits pre-
scribed.
Tokio, Jan. 8-The new cabinet is
expected to accept the $50,000,000 cut1
in the reconstruction estimate forced
through the Diet before the attack ori
the Prince, which caused the fall of'
the Yamamoto ministry.
Cairo, Jan. 8.-Italy is said to have
asked the government to deliver seo-
eral Tripolitan Nationalist agitators
who hav e taken refuge in Egyptian
territory.
BLONDE or BRUNETTE
"Weep and you are called a baby,
Laugh and you arecalled a-fool,
Yield and you're called a coward
Stand and you're called a mule,

Smile and they'll call you silly,
Frown and they'll call you gruff.
Put on a front like a millionaire,
A -. ...,......t,.,.7.,. - 11- ...... .t~ .

tr
t,
x
'

WAGE WILL SPEAK
ON GREECE TODAY

REED ADDRESSES
S.CA. BAQE

Noted Archaeologist To Give Lecture,
At 4:15 In Natural Science
Auditorium
SCHOLAR IS DIRECTOR OF
BRITISH SCHOOL AT ATHENS

Alan B. Wace, director of the Brit-
ish school of Archaeology at Athens
and said to be one of the mast dis-
tinguished of modern archaeologists,
will deliver a University lecture at
o'clock this afternoon in Natural
Science auditorium. His subject is
"Prehistoric Greece: A Study in
Archaeological Reconstruction."
Touring Country
Mr. Wace is touring the country
and giving lectures at various uni-
versities and colleges under the aus-
pices of the International Institute of
Education. He spoke in Detroit yes-
terday and will go to Toledo from
here. All his- lectures deal' with
Archaeology, anthropology and allied
subjects.,
A paper was read by Mr. Wace be-
fore the meeting of the American'
Archaeology Institute at Princeton
university the latter part of Decem-
ber. At that time he was said to
have been well received. This is his
first trip to America.
The speaker received his education
at Pembroke college, Cambridge uni-
versity later going to the British
f school of Archaeology in Athens and
I Rome' for research work. He was a
{ fellow of Pembroke college from 1904
to 1913. Mr. Wacealso lectured from
1912 to 1914 at the University' of St.
Andrews, Scotland, upon ancient his:
tory.
tory. In 1914 he accepted his present
position as director of the British
School of Archaeology at Athens. He
was born in England in 1879.
Noted Author
Several books have been written
by Mr. Wace, some of which are: "A
Catalogue of Sparta museum," "Pre-"
historic Thessaly" and "Nomads of
the Balkans." In addition he has con-
tributed many valuable papers and
essays to scholarly publications.
At the present time Mr: Wace is
also a member of the council of the
Hellenic society and a corresponding
member of the Imperial German Ar-
chaeological institute and fellow of
St. Johns college, Cambridge, univer-
sity.
The lecture today will be illustrat-
ed by stereoptican slides.

Professor Asserts That Students
CIrstIan Association Should
Get Campus Support -
DETARR, '25M, OUTLINiS WORK.
ACCOMPANIED 1N PAST YEAR
Opening the Student Christian as-
sociation's financial drive with a ban-
quet given at 5:30 o'clock in the Meth-
odist church, Prof. T. H. Reed of the
politcal science departmient delivered
the principal address before the stu-
dents participating in .the:campaign on
why they should give their best effor-
ts to the drive. Short talks:. were al-
so delivered by a number :,f students
actively engaged in the association's
work.
"I am not an advocate of a cam-
paign just for itself," Professor. Reed
said.. "It Is what the campaign stands.
for that'counts. Here it stands for
the spiritual aspect of a man's life.
and I am for it."
. 'S. DeTarr, '25M, general chair-
man of the. campaign introduced the 1
speaker outlining also the work that
is asked of those who are participat-
ing in the drive. "The money that we
hope to get in this .campaign." he,
said, "Goes into student activities not
into salaries."
-Short talks were also de'ivered by
the chairman of the various Studemit
Christian. association's' departments
describing the work which they havel
each beenrcarrying on. Thse who
spoke were J. K. Dunn, '24, 'Perry
Hayden, '25, Lionel Crocker of the
public speaking department and Far-
ry (;lark, '24.
The total to far obtained in the drive
at 2:00 o'clock last night is $1,002.
15,000 COPIS F B
PIEEPLANIAVAILABLE

Washington, Jan. 8-(By A.P.)-
Steps toward mcaking rigidly effective
the Coolidge arms embargo directed
against the de la Huerta faction in
6 Mexico went forward rapidly today.
The treasury forwarded instruct-
ions to customs officers and prohibi-
tion enforcement agents to enforce
vigilently all laws and regulations
under which business across. the bor-
der is transacted, while upon request
of the State department the American
Railway association, through its car
service division, declared a freight
embargo against shipment of arms and
other war equipment to Mexico unlese
approved by a United States govern-
ment agency.
The embargo order was forwarded
at once by the association to its mem-
bers in, the United States, among
whom are all of the major railroads
of the country, and is to- become effec-
tive immediately.
The' treasury in ,addition to tele-
graphing explicit directions to border
points, also notified all court author-
ities to hold up exports of arms'oT
other munitions destined for the Mex-
ican reb'el forces. The action was pre-
liminary to the drafting of regulationsE
to carry out forma'ly the terms of the
embargo. proclamation issued yester-
day by President Coolidge.
The action -looking to an ;effective
tightening of the lines aloiig! ;the bor-
der at American ports wad 'still an-
other move on the part' of the admin-
istration in its progressively develop-
ing policy of giving aid to the, Obregon
government of1Mexico by'se-ling it
war equipet and at the. sauce time
'preventing, un so far as legally 'pos-:~
sible munitiens reaching the de la
Huerta forces.
FRENCH PARLi WEST
APEISML3ST SESSIO

The Day's News At
The Capitol
The British embassy asked for in-
formation regarding recent seizure of
British liquor ships outside the 3 mile
limit.
House Republican leaders expressed
confidence that they could press to a
vote tax legislation before action on
a soldiers' bonus.
The Senate passed a bill to create
a bureau of civil aeronautics in the
Commerce department.
Senator Copeland, democrat, New
York, told the Senate that secretary
Mellon was trying to sandbag the bon-
us by appealing to the country's pock-
etbooks.
The Senate adopted a resolution de-
signed to make public the position in
the market of wheat speculators and
commission firms dealing in futures.
Decision was reached by the sen-
ate election committee to bring from
Texas the ballots in the contested
election of Senator Mayfield, demo-
crat.
Senator McCormick, republican, Il-
linois; denounced the Bok peace plan
and Elihu Root, chairman of the com-
mittee of award, in a speech to the
Senate.
Both Senate and House agricultur-
al committees took up the question
of farm legislation and Secretary Wal-
lace conferred with western senators
and representatives on the subject of
grazing lands. .'
A railroad embargo was planned]
against the shipment of war muni-
tions to Mexico while treasury agents
at border points and ports were or-
dered to prevent illegal shipments to
the rebels.
FIREMEN CHECK BLAZE,
ON.LONDONWATERFRONT
London, Jan. 8-(By A.P.)-The
fires which had been raging since yes-
terday afternoon along the Thames in
the neighborhood of the West India'
flocks were extinguished at noon to-
day. Buildings extending over .an ar-I
ea of a quarter of a mile. were con-
sumed. The damage is estimated at
more than 200,000. The firemen- lab-E
ored -throughout last . night inl relays
trying to stop the spread of the fire
and keeping it from coming into con-
tact with the adjoining warehouses
filled with imflamable goods..

DAILY TO HOLD OPEN FORUM
ON BOK WORLD PEACE PLAN
I In an effort to cooperate in
the referendum, being undertak-
en by the American Peace Award
in order to allow the people to
make known their approval or
disapprqival of the prize winn-
ing proposal for world peace.
The Daily will devote en entire
page in next Sunday's edition to
a discusion of the merits of thej
plan. The Daily will be glad
torpublish discussions of the
proposed plan by its readers
All manuscript must be in the
hand§ of the Editor by Friday
Imorning.
I
Eleven Aids Named To Coleman, '26E,
Head Of- Prom; Date Not
Definitely Set
TOLLE TO DIRECT FRESHMAN
FROLIC AT UNION MARCH 28
Preparations for the two annual
underclass dances, the Soph Prom and
the Frosh Frolic were begun yester-
Oay with the appointment of the com-
mittees to head the dances and with
the announcement of the date of one
of them.
The Frosh Frolic will be held on
March 28 with Alvin Tolle, '27 as gen-
eral "chairman, Assisting Tolle will
be a committee of four freshmen,
Joseph Harley, '27, George Heston,
'27, Frederick Shillito, '27, and Mar-
gurite Monroe, '27.
The Frolic will be leld in the Un-
ion ballroom this year as has been
the custom in former years, and will
be formal. A meeting of the com-
mittee will be held tonight at which
sub-committees to .take charge of the
arrangements for finances, music and
other necessary features will be ap-
pointed. ..
William Coleman, '26E, will be the
leader of the Soph Prom. The chair-
manship .o fthe committee this year
goes, to an engineer, it being the cus-
tomn. to alternate each year between
the literary students and the engn-
feers., ,,,The date fAor the Prom as ot
yet ben set. ,
. The committee for the Prom, ap-.
pointed by the presidents of the class-
es, is as follows: R. F. Kohler, '26E;
Emil. Dieter, '26E, Earl Fingerlee,
'26, George Burke, '26E,. Brayton Dean
'26E, Marcus Rose, '26, Edward West-
over, '26E, Ray Owen, '26A, Richard
Freyburg, '26, Sydney Huff, '26, and
Ralph Wertz, 26E.
The Prom will also be held in the
Union ballroom this year. The date
will probably be set as several weeks
ahead of the Frosh Frolic, this hav-
ing been the time that the sophomore
dance has ben held in past years.
BOOTH APPLICATIONS
F Fraternities and organizations wish-
ing booths for the 1925 J-Hop that will
be held Feb. ., may make applica-
tion for them from 2 to 5 o'clock this
afternoon at. the ticket desk in the
main - corridor of the Jnion. A rep-
resentative from each group should be-
sent -to* the Union at this time."
- Following the making of applica-
tions for the booths a drawing' will
take place at a date to be announced
later. Each group that has applied
for a booth will be a'lowed to draw
a number, the number designating the

location of the booth. Fifty-three
booths will be sold this year, three
being reserved for patrons and, pat-
ronesses. .
The price of the booths has been
raised for this Hop, being now $40.
With the booth goes a ticket for the
booth chaperones. The booths are in!
both Waterman and Barbour gymna-
aii'u

FIFTH PARIAME
Olf KING ER
LABOR PARTY ELATED BU
OVER ASSUMPTION (
POW"ER
JOHN HENRY WHITL
RfE-ELECTED SPE.
Interest Centers In Confere
Party Leaders Outsid
Parliament
London, Jan. 8.-(By A
fifth parliament, of the prese:
opened today in a quiet and
ful 'manner, apart from some
effervescence on the part of tV
members, elated at the prol
their party taking office as I
ernment, which only a few
' ago appeared to be quite a
prospect.
The re-election of John Hep
ley as speaker of the new ho
a foregone conclusion and t
aforded no excitement. The
animation in, the talk and gos:
dent to the meeting of any no
ament, le alone a parliament
such unusual possibilities as
Now Has Group Systei
Interest, however, for the
lies rather outside the pai
than within it, namely in the ni
conferences and consultations
the leaders and the parties an
less in the underground intri
separable from a situation
extreme novelty in British po
having to deal for 'the first ti
a new group system of par
stead of the traditional two pa
tern.
The labor party is well awa
influences still working to pr
accession to office, to say noi
1 the efforts which will be mad
feat it when In office,
The recent attempt to prom
agreement between the liber
conservativesto prevent fron
office was scotched but not ali
killed. Underground maneuv
the same purpose are continu
all sorts of rumors are curri
cerning yarogst polltiplans &in
sections said to beh eong e
Idea, none of whicht, however,
verfied, and the prospect still
labor will acceed to power a
its severest trial will come lat
Celebrate Victory
London, Ja. 8.--( y, AP)-
.monstration in Albert hall ton
British labor party celebra-
victories in the recent general
and pledged its united eforts
structive work toward the i
ation of Great Britian, Europe
world at large, if called up, a
a certainty with in ten days,
sume the task of governing t
ish Empire.
'We have been In the battle,
have brought back the trophy,'
Ramsay MacDonald, the party
and pricnipal speaker. On the :
Cwere seated most of the '19
members of the House -of Con
The enthusiastic rank and
the neay 10,000 lIl'rites in I
ience chtered' themselves harsi
election battles were retold a
representatives, of labor pr
themselves . .
Sing Marsellalse
. The meeting began with ti
ing of the Marsellaise and closi
a rendition of theRed Flag.
bor adherents failed to chant
the national anthem.
Nevertheless, the speakers I
in little radical talk, and made
dictions of an approaching
ium. In fact, they gave eve
dence that labor does not in
turn England upside down. 1V
Donald pleaded with the pr

fairness, if labor assumed powe
crowds cheered while he mil
proached 50 reporters grouped
the table before him for thei
torial shortcomings in chror
labor news.
F ARM 0RIEF MEASU
C, OME BEFORE CONG
Washington, Jan.-8.-(By
The farmer received a major s
attention in congress today,
measures being considered
committees and on the floor
Senate- and House, whle the
ment of agriculture also took
in the legislative situation.
The Senate adopted the Ladi
lution directing Secretary Wa
make enquiry into "profesSiona
ulators" . of the Chicago Bo

VICKERS GIVES LECTURE.
ON NDUTRYPROBLEMS,
Mr. Leslie Vickers, of the National
Industrial Conference board gave an
address on "Some Major Problems of
Industry" yesterday afternoon at 4:30:
in Natural Science auditorium. Mr.
Vickers spoke under the auspices of
the University lecture series.
"One of the most important feat-,
ures of our work is the distribution.
to our clients and members of abso- :
lutely accurate information concern-
ing the trend of wages," said Mr. Vick-
ers. "All information is collected by,
our own staff of investigators, and
once a month is distributed to those
concerns who have become mem-I
hers, or have been good enough tobco-
operate with us. We are_ also able
to make and :distribute a series of
coato-f-living charts, at the same reg-
uar intervals".
The National Industrial Conference
board is composed of from 60 to 100,
members, and is an association of
manufacturers having for its sole pur-
pose the investigating and obtaining
of facts concerning the presen:, indus-
trial situation, regardless of whom,
those facts might hurt.
Represented in this association are
more than 30 national industries, and
70,000 employers, and more than 8,-,
000.000 workers, in a vast number ofj

The University has received 15,000
copies of the text of the plan which
won the American Peace award, creat-
ed by Edward W. Bok. In order that
students may take part in.-the-nation-
wide referendum to discover -the op-
inion of the people' of the country
regarding the merits of the. plan,i
these copies of the winning proposal
have been placed at the disposal of theI
student body.. Copies may be obtain-
ed at the University library, the Un-1
ion, Barbour gymnasium, the officesj
of the Deans and other prominent
places on the campus.
Enclosed in each plan is a ballot
for the use of the student. It is urg-
ed by University officials that the
members of the student body parti-
cipate in this referendum as the other
institutions of the country are al-
most unanimously backing it.j
In an attmept to foster interest inj
the proposal for world peace, The
Daily will publish next Sunday a full
page devoted to the Bok Peace
Award, containing comment, both
national and local, and a summary of
the purposes which actuated the
creating of the award.

Paris, Jan. 8--(By A.P.)-Speeches
by the Deans of the Senate 'and cham-
ber .of' deputies opened today a ses-
sion of the French parliament which
will be its last before the elections
in May to choose its successor.
In the upper chamber Senator Gus-1
tave Denis, a nonogenarion, paid trib-
ute to the League of Nations.-
"It is thanks to the League of Na-
tons," he said, "that universal peace
will one day reign and it may even,
succeed in drawing that unfortunate
but interesting country, Russia, from
the abyss".
Raoul Perret was re-elected presi-
dent of the chamber of deputies. He
received 325 of the 355 votes cast.'1
Madrid, Jan. 8-The directorate has
suspended publication of the Actuali-
dad Financiera, Spain's foremost-fin-
ancial review, because of an ' article
on the so-called traiff decree.

DEATH TTL REACHES 1
IN PEKINPLANT BLAST
Pekin, Ill., Jan. 8-(By A.P.)-With
the recovery today of four badly
[mangled bodies from the ruins of the
starch of the Corn Products company'
j plant,,which was destroyed, by an ex-
1'plosion . last Thursday 'the known
death'list mounted to 16.
Twenty , workmen still are missing
and their bodies are 'believed buried
in the debris which is now betng at-
tacked by more than an hundred work-
ers.
Luxor, Jan. 8.- Howard Carter ap-
pearimg weak and .ill the native$ are
I muttering again about the :"Pharaoh's
Curse".

There will be a meeting of the~ v - - - -
Preshmen in group II at 7:30 o'clock London, Jan. 8.-The Foreign Office
tonight, on the third floor of the Un-, sharply denies tContinental press re-
Ion. Basketball and vaudeville will ports that the British troops are to
be discussed. be recalled from the Cologne area.
Palmer Christian Will Give
First Organ Recital Today

ADMS TELLS- LIAY
AIMS TO PRESS CLUB'
"Any sincere student capable of tak-
ing advantage of the ,opportunities
offered by the Clements collection of
Americana is welcome to use it," said
Randolph G. Adams, custodian of
Clements library who told of its aims
to the members of the Student Press
club last night in the main room of
the building.
'A library of this sort is not a lux-
ury. It is an advanced research lab-
oratory; a necessity, if we are to
nrogress." declared Dr. Adams who

Palmer Christian, the new Univer- iUniversity life. In bringing Mr. ___ums
} ty ~organist and head of the organ1o Christian to Ann Arbor, the officials
department of the University Schoolshave taken the irst important step in
dearmntoLteUnvestyihogg(hose recitals to the, for OMm[R E COMMISSION1
of Music, will play at his first public, bothin the University and outside of ,
resital here at 4:15 o'clock today ithe city.
afternoon in Hill auditorium, as the Mr. Christian comes here with the IN B "A [1LUT DEL
first' of the regular weekly twilight recommendation of a- distinct ability'
organ recitals. Mr. Christian was re- to plan and 'such a series of
centy appointed by the Board of Re- recita d rrasiresumtioB o A lot-h
gents and the University Musical-S ds an ahis appointment was re- Sena- ,:erred resumption of ballot-,
gnsadheUiestMuiaSolceived with enthusiasm. IIng -, iy, in the deadlock over, the
ciety, to fill the two positions left iHis playing has been most favor- chai;'manshipof theinterstatercore.,
vacant- when Earl V. Moore was made ab iti . bybt. I
vacant rwhe UarlV.Morerswysc made ably critiized'by both American and merce commission because of others
director of the University School' of Etiropean critics who have united to matters which engaged its attention.
Music. Pris not only his deep understand- Replying to a complaint by" Senator
Mr. Christian arrived in Ann Arbor ing and appreciation of the possibilit- Dill, democrat, Washington, that the
with Mrs. Christian last week, and ies of his instrument, but technique committee should get to work, Sena-
was heard first on Sunday at the Con-' nd sense of musicianship that is his. tor Curtis, of Kansas, the republican

I

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