100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 13, 1923 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ER 13, 1923

TIlE MICHICAN DAILY

MeL e&e TO- H OLD
CONVENTION HERE,
Modern Language Association Con-
-i'enes iere For Fortieth Annual
Meeting

Where The G. 0 .OP,1Will Meet In 1924

celebration of Christmas. All stu-
'dents wbo are planning to take these
courses must register in room 1026,
East Engineering building this week.
No extra fees are charged University
students.
Warsaw, Dec. 12.-The remains of
Henryk Sienkiewicz, who wrote "Que
Valis," are to be brought to Poland
from Switzerland, where he died it
1916, and laid to rest beside Koskiusz-
ko and other national heroes in the
Ciacow Cathedral.

"The Michigan Mongrel"
a doggy paper
ON by
SALEb
TODAY P. D. E.
NOTE:-No Relation to G.D.E.!

I1

3r:
,p
s
4.;
ii
3'~

PLAN SIX SESSIONS DURING
THREE DAYS TI1S MONTR
The fortieth meeting of the Modern
Languaige Association of America, will
!'e hel 1 here Thursday, Friday and
f~atmJay, DeeembeĀ°r 27, 28. 29, on the
invitation of the University. There
will be six sessions, made up of group!
meetings which will be, held in theI
Natural science building.
The first session at 11:30 a. m., Dec.
27, will take up French literature of
the seventeenth and eighteenth cen-
turies. In connection with this meet-
ing there will be a Voltaire exhibit.
Professor Morize has offered to bring
his entire collection of etchings, en-
gravings and prints, as wvell as a'
very ]age number of originaledit-
ions. This exhibit will be in one of
the upper rooms of the Library.
Following this session members of
the Asrociation will be guests of the
University at luncheon at one o'clock
in the assembly room of the Union.
Burton Will Talk
Preident Marion L. Burton will
give an address of welcome at the sec-
ond session which will be held Thurs-
day afternoon. Prof Albert Feuill-'
erat, of the University of Rennes,
France, and Prof; Arthur O. Lovejoy,
of the Johns Hopkins University,
have been invited to give talks at this
meeting. Professor Feuillerat will
speak on "The Future of Literary
Criticism." Professor Lovejoy's sub-
ject will be "Some Theses Concern-
ing Romanticism."
The annual meeting of the Ameri-
can Dialect society will be held
Thursday afternoon as one of the
group meetings.
The third session will be held at
4:30 Thursday afternoon. Some of
the important speakers are to be:
Prof. W. A. Nitze, of the University of
Chicago, Prof. Edward Prokosch, of
Bryn Mawr, Prof. C. P. Wagner of the
University, George L. Hamilton, who
was a former member of the faculty
and Prof. J. S. P. Tatlock, who was
here five years ago. Professor Tat-
lock is known to be one of the, fore-
most authorities in the country on
Chaucer. His paper will be "A His-
tory of the Chaucer Concordance."
Will Meet In Union
On Thursday evening, Dec. 27, the
president of the Association, Prof.
Oliver F. Emerson, will deliver an ad-
dress in the assembly room of the
Union. Professor Emerson's topic
will be "The Battle of the Books."
Before this address the ladies of the
Association will be entertained at din-
ner in the Union by the University.
There will also be a diner of the "Old
Guard" in the Union. To this dinner,
are invited all persons whose mem-
bership in the Association began be-
for the year 1900.
The programs of the other three
sessions will be announced later.

!#

I

GARIo o 1so e .Maowe t. soy to$S1t.6
Sat. Mat. Soo to $2.00
SECONI) )IASlPIG WEFK
CAT And The CANARY
'SHRILLS! LAUGHS! SlOCKS!
I
Sizes Color.
For real Fountain Pen Satisfaction
Use
"The Ink That Made
The Fountain Pen Possible"
3ANFOR PE s

Groceries, Baked Goods, Milk Crear
Fruits, Vegetables, Candy Bars,

College Grocery
516 E. William

Cig~arettes, Tobacco.

Open Sundays and Evenings for Your Convenence.

Between Maynard and Thompson.

E. COLLEGE GROCERY

Pita]

Above, exterior of Cleveland's mamotli $6,I)0(000 public hall. Below, int:'rirr during amateur boxing tourney
With the spacious new $6,000,000 public auditorium, Cleveland hopes to land both Democratic and Republic-
an national conventions for 1924. Coolidge has favored Cleveland for the G. 0. P., so now all that remains is t
get the Democrats. The building is the largest building of its kind in the w orld, and can seat 12,500 persons, with
facilities for seating several additional thousands in an emergency. The building has, inaddition to its large
hall, 70 smaller rooms where private caucuses and committee meetings may be held. Former Senator Pomerene
on a recent visit to Cleveland declared he believed the city might get both c onventions.

ENGINEERINGHOLIDAY
COURSES TO BE GIVEN
Courses will be offered in highway!
engineering during the Christmas va-
cation, according to -an announcement

made yesterday by Prof. A. H. Blan- hours credit in the graduate school
chard of that department. Civil en- and the engineering college. They
gineering 67, "Highway Transport Ec- consist of thirty lectures and not less
onomics and Surveys' and Civil engin- than forty-five hours of outside li-
eering 72, "Gravel and Broken Stone brary reading. Undergraduates may
Roads, Dust Prevention and Bitumin- take either of these courses for cred-
ous Surfaces", will be the two courses! it towards the degree of bachelor of
given during the period, Dec. 17 to science in engineering.
29. The period from noon, Dec. 22, to
Each of these courses count for two noon, Dec. 26 will be allowed for the

Co CROkINA
for
Christmas
A CORONA will bring more
than a Merry Christmas. It will
bring years of easy, rapid, and I
trouble-free writing. The ideal
gift for the professional man,
the salesman, the storekeeper,
student, housewife - everyone
who writes.
CORONA is the result of fifteen
years' successful experience in
building portable typewriters.
More Coronas are in use than
all otther portables combined.
The new XC model, with 90
characters instead of the usual
84, permits a great variety of
uses for thy college student,
such as Engineering, Medical,
Chemical and Language type-
writing. Come in and investi-
gate.
0. D. lMORRILL I
17 Nickels Arcade.
IOpen evenings until Christmas.
... .- ... . . . . .._ _..v

m~

E.

no

Choose fromWuerths
and it will be right, whether it's a Tom Wye, two or four
pocket, or a heavy Shaker Knit coat or pull-over, a

Brushed Wool, plain or fancy.
from-

We have them pric

$3.50 to $10.00

mirifU

PROMINENT VETERINS TO
ADDRESS GUN AND BADE.
Col. Spofford, district manager of
the United States Veteran's bureau,
will speak at the Guntand Bladerban-
quet Thursday, Jan. 10. Other speak-
ers are Mr. Cambell, chief of rehabil-I
itation of the sub-district office in De-
troit and Mr. Bryce, local coordinator
of the Veteran's bureau.,
Since each of the speakers is di-
rectly connected with the welfare and
rehabilitation of student.aveterans,
former soldiers on the campus arel
especially invited. Tickets for the'
banquet will be on sale within a few
days.
London, Dec. 12.-England regards
a "strong American navy as an added{
guaranty of the peace of the world."
So Secretary's Denby's reportasking
$30,000,000 for the navy causes nol
alarm.
Manila, Dec. 12.-Power to use dis-.
cretion in controlling land tax collec-
tions would be taken from the govern-
or-general under a bill passed by the
Philippine senate.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
E~AST BOUND
Llimiteds: 6 a. m., 9:10 a. m. and
every two hours to 9:10 p. m.
Express: 7 a. n., 8 a m. and every
two hours to 8 p. m.
Locals: 7 .a. m., 8:55 a. m. and'
every two hours to 8:55 p. m.,
11 p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:40
. m., 12:25 a. th. and 1:15 a. n.m
WE~ST BOUND
Limiteds: 8:47 a. m. and every two
hours to 8:47 p. m.
Express (making local stops): 9:51
a,.m and every two hours to 9:50
P. M.
Locals: 7:50 a. m., 12:10 a. m.

J.FW eTht@

in

cash,
1st Prize
3rd Prize,
4th Prize

prizes
. 125.00
S75.00
w o 50800

Next to Wuerth Theater.

Down T

SPECIAL

TRAIN

SERVICE

Account Christmas Vacation

And Special Awards of $25.00 Each

C ASH prizes-totaling $1,500.00
--will be awarded for the best
advertisements written for college pub-
lications by college students on the
world-famous cereal products, Grape-
Nuts, Post Toasties and Post's Brarn
Flakes.
Four grand prizes, the first $200.00;
the second $125.00; the third $75.00;
and the fourth $50, for the best ad-
vertisements received from all colleges,
and special prizes of $25.00 each for
the best advertisement received from
each college.

To be eligible for one of these cash
prizes, you must be a college student.
All advertisements must be received on
or before January 15, 1924, and

awards will be made February
1924.

15,

VIA ANN ARBOR RAILROAD
For the accomodation of University of Michigan Students, returning home Friday, December
14th, account of Christmas Vacation, THE ANN ARBOR RAILROAD will operate a special
train leaving Ann Arbor at 11:40 a.m. (c.t.), arriving in Toledo at 2:00 p.m. (e.t.), pro-
tecting all Toledo connections.
THIS TRAIN WILL HANDLE PASSENGERS ONLY FOR TOLEDO AND POINTS BEYOND
In order to protect Pere Marquette and Grand Trunk connections, a first section of train No.
53 will be operated, leaving Ann Arbor at 4:41 p.m. (c.t.), for Owosso, Mich, stopping at
intermediate stations to discharge passengers.
REGULAR TRAIN SERVICE
(Southbound)
In addition to the above Special Service, the following regular train service, Ann Arbor to
Toledo, will prevail:

Ask the business manager of The
Michigan Daily, or write us for in-
formation about the contest, and liter-
ature describing the products, right
away. See if you can't write the best
ad in your college, and top the entire
field as well.

Lv. Ann Arbor 11:40 a.m. (c.t.) 2:00 p.m. (c.t.)
Ar. Toledo 2:10p.m. (e.t.) 5:00p.m. (e.t.)
(Northbound)

4:30 p.m. (c.t)
7:00 p.m. (e.t.)

Intercollegiate Ad-Writing Contest Department
POSTUM CEREAL COMPANY, Inc.
BATTLE CREEK, MICHIGAN

Northbound trains Nos. 51 and 53 leave Ann Arbor, 8:10 a. m. (c.t.), and 4:41 p. m.
(c.t.), respectively, connecting with Grand' Trunk, Michigan Central, Pere Marquette and
G. R. & I., for all principle destinations in lower and upper Peninsula of Michigan.
Would suggest purchasing of tickets and checking of baggage in advance, so as to avoid un-
necessary delay and confusion at train time.
H. S. BRADEY, H. A. MILLS,
Traffic Manager, Commercial Agent,
Toledo, Ohio. Ann Arbor. Mich.

AilllllliM)1111111 ill ll 11111111111111111111111[ill I i t t ill m illill i i 01I~f10111Q0111t10p1l10 410IITI 0IQ0 1 111111110111}1 9 0 1111111111{0111101IfII11111U11111110011111pgf1111110Q111in

r r ri n n i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan