100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 12, 1923 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE'
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Atbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Ariistant I'cst-
viaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.5o; by mail,
t4.oo.,
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard $treet.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Bitsi-
ness, 960.
Signed conrunications, not exceeding So0
words, will he published in The -Daily at
the Ois-retion of the Editor. Upon request,
the identity of communicants will be re-
garded as confidential.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176.M
MANAGING EDITOR
HOWARD A. DONAdUE
News Editor..............Julian E. Mack
City Editor...................Harry ikey
Editorial Board Chairman.... R. C. Moriarty
Night Editora
E. II. Ailes A. B. Connable
R. A. Billington I. E. Fiske
Harry C. Clark J. G. Garlinghouse
P. M. Wagner
Spoits Editor............. Ralph N. Byers
Women's Ediur............: Winona Hibbard
Telegraph Editor...............R. B. 'air
Sunday Magazine Editor,.. .... L. 'roden
Music Editor..F.... ....Ruth A Howell
Assistant City Editor......Kenncth C. Kellir
Editorial Board

. .-

"The war at least had this of
value for us; our young people
through it saw the vision and felt
the thrill of throwing themselves
into the performance of something
that needed to be done. For them
it was a kind of spiritual adven-
ture. When we as a nation have
this spiritual vision and embark
on this spiritual adventure, then
we can educate our youth as we
feel we ought. We haven't it as
yet, but it will come tomorrow.
"There will be, moreover, an-
other radical change in our col-
leges when this day 'comes. They
will be fundamentally intellectual,
with less thought for the exter-
nais. Their 'work will be solely
the training of youth, the build-
ing of minds, with knowledge as
the instrument. And present-day
knowledge, too, has been growing.
The minds of today know more
than they used to, are far rich-
er than ever before. But no body
of knowledge is understood un-
less it is unified. It must be
brought into a single concept.
Today it is like a picture puzzle
before it has been put together.
When once we have accomplish-
ed this, something new, the mean-
ing of the whole, will flash into
being.
"One failure of our colleges now
is that our graduates do not read
books, a fault largely of our lec-
ture system. The student by this
system is kept in touch with
third-rate minds. When I say this
I do not mean that our teachers
are third rate. But I do mean
that Aristotle, Kant, Darwin and
Shakespeare are first-rate minds;
that leaders of thought in our own
period, like Einstein, are in the
second group, and finally that our
teachers belong in the third
group of minds in our communi-
ty today. But however good the
teacher is, he has no right to in-
terpose himself between the pu-
pil and the first and second group

' TOMVE ROLL
ALMOST OUR
ALL-POETRY
P T ANULBER
IPLAINT OF A YULGARI'ST

p

CAMPUS OPINION

instein I oert Ra;
Andrew Propper
Assistants

isay

B. G.s Jaetke R. S. Mansfield
f) N. Brkman E. C. Mack
helen Brown Verena Moran
Bernadette Cote Regina Reichmai
Q. W. Da AS W. ii. Soneman
Hlarold Ehrlich H1. R. Stots
it. C. Fingerle K. E. Stycr
'. r. Henry N. R. TVial
erothy Kamin S. B.Tiemble
oseph Kruger W. J. Waitiour
Elizabeth Lieberman
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAURENCE H. FAVROT
,Advertising .............E. L. Dune
Advetising.............. Purdy
fAdvertiing...........W. Roessr
Advertising.............. Scherer
Accounts......... ........A. S. Morton
Circulation .-.. . ...Perry M. Hayden
Publication ...............Lawrence Pierce
Assistants
G. W. Campbell °Rdw D. Hoerlemiker
ennti{ Caplan "N. 'E. Rolland
as. Champion M L. Ireland
onn Conlin Harold A. Marks
Louis M. Dexter Byron Parke
joseph' J. Finn' 1. M.t Rockwell
D avid A. Fox It. E Rose
Lauren Haglit A. J. Seidman
IH. 14.tHale., Wilt Weise
.E Iiawkison f._C F. White
, R. C. Winter
WED SDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1923
Night Editor-EDGAR H. AILES
ALEXANDER MEIKLEJOHN
DIAGNOSTICIAN AND PROPHET
Addrssing a gathering at the Town
Hall in New York recently Dr. Alex-
ander Meiklejohn disclosed some poig-
nant reasons for the current dissat-
sfaction with American clleges and
pronounced a single, cause as the rea-
son for the complete inadequacy of
the present system-the lack of a con-
scious purpose in both academic in-
stitutions and in the nation itself.
Feeling that his presentation and ex-
planation of shortcomings of Ameri-
an colleges have an immediate in-
:erest to men ambitious for the fu-
ure of the University of Michigan,
'he Daily is reprinting herewith the
najor content of his lecture:
"The question really is, 'What
will America of tomorrow be?'
Our colleges can't be better or dif-
ferent unless we as a nation are
also better or different. The rea-
son that colleges today, with their
football, glee clubs, fraternities
and sentimental alumni, are what
they are is because we ourselves
are what these things represent.
America is still growing up, in
numbers, wealth, power complex-
ity, and this is also true of our
colleges. They add a ;hundred
teachers, a thousand students, a
score of new courses or new
buildings much as a boy adds
two inches to his stature.
"The external and mechanical
growth is the main reason for
our dissatisfaction with our col-
leges. Tomorrow they , will be
grown up, will have passed the
period of the gawky boy. Whenl
this will come it is hard to say,
but it will not come until Amer-
ica herself is grown up. Andl
when this :day does come, and I 1
am.inclined to think it is not so
far off, America will have some-
thing very definite to do. Shec
will have something very definite
to ao. She will have a conscious1
purpose.
"France had a conscious pur- I
pose, the glory of France; Eng-s
land had it, the greatness of thet
empire; Germany had it, the con- I
cept of the Fatherland. The.

of minds. Let the student get
his opinions directly from the
Kants and Spinozas.
"Outside control has sapped the
courage and independence of
scholars. They must be made to
feel again their responsibility for
education. At least try the ex-
periment. I think it will succeed,
for it has the advantage of com-'
mon sense. The young people of
America are ready for a new day,
spiritually and intellectually, and
they will achieve it if they aref
not hindered by our presupposi-
tions and prejudices. I hope the
old people will either get out of
their way or join the young in
their movement for the spiritual
adventure."
CHIMES FINDS ITSELF I
With its appearance on the campus
Tuesday morning ;Chimes has justified
itself against whatever charges of
uselessness and misdirected efforts
may have been voiced against it about
the campus. For the first time since
its inception five years ago, has
Chimes fulfilled its purpose. Invari-I
ably highly superfluous matter has
found its way among the pages of
the monthly, which, in its last issue,
excludes the uninteresting and non-
sensical for material highly enter-
taining, interesting, and not without1
literary merit.
Chimes has a function to perform
as a campus opinion magazine, to
stimulate the student body to thought,
-and occasionally to action. In this,
it has during the past largely failed,
but the current issue furnishes plea-
ty of "food for thought" which will,
without doubt occupy the minds of a
large precentage of the undergradu-
ate *body. Acknowledging the diffi-
cult position which Chimes occupies'
among the various other publications
of the University, it deserves con-
gratulations on its admirable execu-}
tion of the function newly assigned
to it.
.w ry~ ~.. , .~ ....-w ,-n.
Twenty-FiWe Years
Ago At Michigan
From the files of the U. of M. Daily,
Dec. 12, 1898. .

Oh take your Aubrey Beardsley prints,
Of women's ugly faces;
Drag off the whole Rococo crew,
With their endless airs and graces.
You can cart away your Titans,
Your Corots and Rembrandts fine-
And give me just Coles Phillips,
Who can make silk stockings shine!
L'Envoi:
For I've never read Homer and Dante;
Nor Dumas, either father or fils;I
No-I simply go to the movies,
And thrill to the Mounted Police.
Peregrine Pickled
** *
Lands!
Mr. Stanley Baldwin, long one of
the most distinguished figures in Brit-
ish public life, has added a new lau-
rel to his already nifty collection. He
is, we believe, the only-man in Eng-
land whom Professor R. Mark Wenley
does not know personally. We are
informed that he didn't even bow to
Mark the last time he was in the
old country.
From the Opera Program I
A rare spirit pervades the campus
of the University of Michigan. It is
broad, liberal and cosmopolitan.
-President Burton's letter
The eighbteenth annual Opera of
the Mimes of the Michigan Union can
truly be called the "Opera Different."
-The author of the Opera
Roundelay
Stillness-like death
Sweet one-be mine
My heart' bleeds when your car-
esses wane-
Opaque shadows-your lips
A-A ,Ahhhhhhh-
Oh Cupid-Ahhhhhhh
Oh hell I can't do it like Poi-
son Ivy.
Carlo.
P.S. HO HUM-just another poem.
* * *
CHILD'S GARDEN OF CAMPUS
ANIMALS
See Bebe is a clinging, child,
Her lips are red, but pouting.
She wears her hat tight to her head,
Her skirts she's always fouting.
On street her clothes are nicely mil;
Much tailored, too, but fetching.
She easily makes friends with you-
Her life she's always sketching.
She likes to read the poets wild-
The very worst, but skillful;
With sentiment she's highly cursed,
P And she is often wilful.
Yet you will find this clinging child
While often cross, but pleasing;
She looks at you all at a loss-
And then her hand you're squeezing.
Hidalgo.
All the boys scouts in Ann Arbor
hav been asked to help in the col-
lection of money to put up a swank
'shrine' in memory of the late Warren
Gamalel H{arding in his native city.
In an official bulletin issued to .the
scouts of the city by the local execu-
tive, one Swits, we find that they are
1 to be rewarded as follows:
* * *"Each troop that se-
cures 100 percent contributions
froni its members will be award-
ed a handsomely engraved certifi-
cate bearing the photograph and
. signature of the late President and
a picture of the iWl4te House
which will be suitable for fram-
ing. The certificate entitles the
troop to an associate member-
ship in the Harding Memorial
Association."
* * *

Last nigt we heard Mr. Lindsay. His
glass of water was all bubbly even
before he arrived.
When the introducer announced that
Mr. Frost might come here to lecture,
a person applauded.
The introducer, after calling Mr.
Lindsay "significant" sneaked off the
stage.

THE LEAGUE AND ARMAMENT
To the Editor:
With all due respect for Prof. W.
H. Hobbs and his theories I would
submit that he has triumphantly ar-
rived at a conclusion by the simple
but faulty process of assuming as
truth, that which he wishes to be-
lieve.
He points out that the "history of
the human race thus far has been
largely a history of its wars" and
then assumes that history must re-
peat itself and reaches the conclu-
sion that efforts to change the course
into the channels of peac are use-
less and futile
He attacks the League of Nations
Non-Partisan association by quoting
from Justice John H. Clarke who as-
serts that wars are in the brewing
land that sohething must be done to!
prevent them. Even Professor Hobbs
acknowledges that future wars are'
likely: he differs from those who fa-
vor the League as to the means of
either pieenting them or limiting
their scope. The League idea is to
attempt to settle differences between
nations just as individuals settle
them within a nation; Professor
Hobbs advocates the old theory of
"every man for himself and the devil
take the hindmost". The League does
not stand for total abolition of arm-
aments immediately, that is a prob-
lem for the, nations to agree upon,
I but it does stand for the idea that
such agreements as the Washington
Conference can and will make any
further expansion of military estab-
lishments unnecessary. His assump-
tion that, because the League believes
that an agreement among the nations
may bring about peace, its adoption
would place our country at the mer-1
cy of the world because our whole
army and navy would be wiped out,
is false. Armaments are to be lim-
ited, it is hoped, but only in con-
cent with the rest of the world. Does
Professor Hobbs believe that the work'
of the Washington Conference should
be undone? Does he believe that
further reduction along the same line
is impossible? If sotlihen his theory
by analogy, that becuo history shows
that wars have bees waged they will
continue forever, ' hpen to correc-
tion.
The stand he take i"confusing. His
whole argument seems to be that per-
manent peace is impossible and there-
fore we should not waste time in fool-
ish movements to bring it about yet!
in hiss look "The World War and Its1
Conequences," he a proves the state~-
ment that "the petrnanent peace of
the world can be secured only through
the, gradual . concentration of prepon-
derant military strength in the hands
of the most pacific nations". Can he
assure us that such a combination
will be permanent? Will it conduce
to the peace of the world to have it
dominatedaby a powerful military al-
Sliance of a few nations? Will these
nations remain "pacific and demo-
cratic" when they possess such pow-
er? Can he point out any such alli-
ance that has been lasting and has
brought about permanent peace? His
history refutes him. Evolution, change,
the desire to be free from such res-
i'traint has ever brought about the rise
to power of new nations and the
downfall of others and the conse-
quent dstruction of these "few power
alliances". Why not give the idea of!
allowing all nations an equal chance!
to be heard, a trial? If it fails the

results can be no more disheartening
than that of these military alliances.
K. F. Clardy, '25L.
YESTERDAY
By SMYTHE
Coolidge on American Homes
"In a free republic, a great Govern-
ment is the product of a great people.
They will look to themselves rather
than Government for success. The
destiny, the greatness of America lies
around the hearthstone. If thrift and
industry are taught there, and the
example of self-sacrifice often ap-
pears, if honor abide there and high
ideals, if there the building of fortune
be subordinate to the building of
character, America will live in secur-
ity, rejoicing in an abundant prosper-
ity and good government at home, and
in peace, respect and confidence
abroad. If these virtues be absent
there is no power that can supply I
these buildings. Look well, then, to
the hearthstone, therein all hope for
America lies."
Any example of the writing of Cal-
vin Coolidge will reveal the character

BOTH
- ~n

ENDS

O F

T7E D -IAGON A L

'w.s

.. 1

DETROIT UNITED LINES
EAST BOUND
Limiteds: 6 a. in., 9:10 a.im. and
every two hours to 9:10 p. n.
Express: 7 a. in., 8 a m. and every
two hours to 8 p. m.
Locals: 7 a. m., 8:55 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:55 p. in.,
11 p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:40
p. in., 12:26 a. in. and 1:15 a. m.
WEST BOUND
Limiteds: 8:47 a. m. and every two
hours to 8:47 p. m.
Express (making lcal stops): 9:5U
a. m. and every two hours to 9:60
p. In.
Locals: 7:50 a. in., 12:10 a. in.

-TONIGHT
____ Grangor's

L

i1
t

Read The Daily "Classified" Columns

I I

I

liDECEMBER
S 1W T IW T IF S
1
2 3 4 5 '6 "7 8
3 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 .. . _____
PRE-HOLIDAY SALE ON
MEN'S HATS
Hats that were $3.40, Now $1.00
Hats that were. $4.00, Nov $3.50
Hats that were $4.50, Nov $3.75
Hats that were $5.00, Now $4.25
Hats Cleaned and Reblocked at
low prices for High.Class Work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard St. Phone 1792
(Where D. U. I. Stops at State)

Open
Until

Evenaigs
Christamas

Cam's

I

WAL

AJ)RIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS LINE
Central Time (Slow Time)
Leave Chamber of Commerce
Week Days Sundays
6:45 a m. 6:45 a. m.
12:45 P.mt. 6:45 p. m, I
4:45P. M.1
JAS. PH.ELLIOTT, Proprietor.
Phone 926-M Adrian. Mich.
Toot Tobles ?
Have your feet examined
and diagnosed by a spec-
ialist. Consultations Free.
IRLVING WARMOLTS
D. S.(C.
Chiropodist and Orthopedist
707 North University Phone 2652

t

'I

B U Y A M A N ' S G I F T S I N A MAN' S ST OR E

Gloves--ne o he many things
you can take him from this big

store for Christmas.

There is

To Prove We're I
BIt from

' Habt euch vorh'
Dodd, Mead and company are about rit, .
to issue the authoritative book on the Paragraphos wol
Dreyfus case by Mr. F. C. Conybeare, Damit ihr nachh
whose articles in the English reviews, Dass er nichts
over the pseudonym of "Hugenot," B uche steht.
have attracted such wide attention.
The author is the son-in-law of Max
Muller, and owing to this connection
has been able to give the opinions of' Which, being r
various distinguished Germans on the American idiom,2
subject, and their feelings in regard Get up your stu
to it. The book will contain protraits " So You can tell
of all the prominent characters con- The prof don't sa
nected with the Dreyfus case. That ain't in his

Highbrow, Here's a
n Faust-
er wohl praepar- -
hl einstudirt,
her besser seht,
sagt als was im
Mephistopheles

every style he could possibly
desire. M~any unusual values at
$3

endered i
means
.ff
ay nothing
book.

nto the

Others at $2 to $7.50.

I T-"q -T- 'r -w°

"r d r lk o

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan