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December 08, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-12-08

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0

THE WEATHERI
CLOUDY; PROBABLY RAINI
TODAY

Stit i tau

at

ASSOCIATEI
LEASED WIRE

WESTERN CONFERE]
EDITORIAL ASSOCIA'T

VOL. XXXIV. No. 65 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1923 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE

HUER TIST AGTION
IMPERILS OBREGON
REGIME INMEXICO
INSURRECTIONISTS, 22,000 STRONG'
GATHER UNDER COMAND
OF SANCHEZ

"Cotton Stockings" Offends
Critical Taste Of Mr. Cowles,

REBEL LEADERS PLAN '
PROVISIONAL POWER
Federal Violation of State Rights Is
Cause of Uprising In
Republic
r
Vera Cruz, Dec. 7.-(By A. P.)-
Guadalupe-Sanchez, leader of the re-
bellion against the government of
President Obregon, in a message sent
today to all the chiefs of military op-
erations in Mexico, announces that
"twenty-two thousand men, two hun-
dred and thirty machine guns, four
batteries of artillery and all warships
in the Gulf of Mexico and, last but not
least, that power of public opinion,
are backing the Huertist movement
against the Obregon government and
General Calles."
General Sanchez then makes a plea
to the country inviting the people to
Join the movement in order to avoid
bloodshed.
The gun boat Bravo sailed for Tus-
tam with troops under orders of the
rebel leaders.
Obregon Movements Uknown
Up to noon today no news had been
received as to the state of affairs in
Mexico City and nothing is known as
to whether President Obregon has al-
ready moved troops against Gen. San-
chez. Thus far there has been no
abnormal occurrence at Vera Cru or
the advance post held by the rebel
troops.
Vera Cruz, Dec. 7.-Troops in the
entire maritime zone have Joined the'
insurgent movement against President
Alvaro Obregon and Gen. P. Elias
Calles, according to reports received
at an early hour this morning. The
rebellion is said to embrace the whole
of the Huasteca oil region.
Plan Provisional Government
Leaders of the movement, including
Adolfo de la Herta, Gen. Guadalupe
Sanchez, chief of military operations
in this district, and Jorge Prieto Laur-
ens,. are preparing to set up a provi-
sional president. Rafael Zubaran Cap-
many isreported to be slated for the
post., Several deputies of the National'
Congress, most of them prominent in'
the Cooperatista Party, which is sup-
porting the presidential candidacy of
de la Huerta, are either in Vera Cruz
or are on their way here.
Leaders of the revolt have offered
guaranties and employment to the
people, and have given assurances that
trade will be protected.
Many landowners have joined the
rebels, hoping thereby to regain the
properties they lost under the law
compelling landholders to share their
estates with their tenants.
Oppose Federal Interference
From the message sent to President
Obregon by the instigators of the
movement here on Wednesday night,
it appears that the purpose of the
movement is to prevent federal inter-
ference with the affairs of the states.
The telegram referred to "the viola-
tion of the sovereignty of the states of
San Luis Potosi and Michoacan, which
states ck independence and guaran-
ties for the free functioning of their
respective powers because of federal
interveltion." It is recalled that con-
troversies recently resulted from the
gubernatorial elections in these two
states, the effect of which was to bring
the federal government into conflict
with state officials.-

By Jason Cowles
The whole trouble with the opera
can be explained by the. failure of theI
much-touted "Lady of My Tapestry
'number to get across: it is inconsist.-
ent. ,What good does it do to have a
handsome fellow warble a song about
the beauty of the lady on his tapestry!
and then have a lot of women stetj
out from some windows back-stage,
much to the surprise of the audience,
if these same women are about 90'
per cent ugly? The brunettes weren't
so bad, but all of the blondes wer,
hideous.
If all the scenes in the opera were'
like the one between Nedda Calvert
and Jerry,-in other words, burlesque,
the show would be a good deal better
than it is now. Of if all the scenes
were like the ones where Ames ap-
pears alone, the show would be a
g'eat deal better. It is the combina-
tion of these two entirely different
motifs that weakens the production.

Furthermore, what good does it do
tW have the stunning hero in his Wool-
gore suit sing a romantic song to the
beautiful heroine if he can't quite get
to the top note? Even if Ames does
change his clothes every three minutes
after the first scene. .
Ames, moreover, didn't seem to fit
his part very well. He is very fem-
inine, and as long as he doesn't have
to be anything more, he is quite
charming, as several other reviewers1
have said already. But when he has
to say some lines that have something
besides femininity in 'them, he fails.
These lines should be deleted, possibly.
Ames will never be able to say "for
example" naturally if he rehearses
from now till the show goes on the
road. Probably nobody else could
either.
A handsome bouquet was presented
to the principals last night, on behalf
of The Michigan Daily, by courtesy of
the BluMaize Blossom shop.

I

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PEHRORMANCE HERE
reat Demand for Seats Occasions
Additional Showing of Mimes
Production
LDVANCE SALES SHOW'
/ POPULARITY IN EAST
A second extra performance of "Cot-.
on stockings" the eighteenth annual<
nion opera, will be given at the Whit-<
ey theater Thursday, Dec. 13, it was
ecide'd by Union officials yesterday.
'he unusual demand for seats that left,
uch a large number of students un-I
ccommodated, caused the scheduling1
f the extra showing. <
Seats for the additional performance 3
vill go on sale at 10 o'clock this morn-!
ng at the box office of the Whitney
heater. Due to the late scheduling of
he extra show, every seat in the house4
s available and an exceptional op-
ortunity is offered for those who wisi
o obtain good seats.
The showing of a second extra per-1
brmance of a Union opera comes for
he first time this year after the larg-
st seat sale ever known for a Michi-
an opera. Every seat was sold for!
he six regular performances and for
he extra performance tonight' far in'
dvance of the time of the show.
Following the presentation of "Cot-I
on Stockings" Thursday night, thel
ast and members of the company will
eave for Toledo where the first show-
ng of the 1924 opera on its road trip
till be made. The opera will play in'
5 cities this year, the largest num-]
er ever attempted.
Advance seat sales in the houses
where the opera will play on its trip
how that the reception of the show
here is practically the same as in Ann
krbor. Several of the cities have!
tired Homer Heath, manager of the
Inion, in an attempt to schedule extra
erformances. In New York, where;
'Cotton Stockings" will be presented,'
n the Metropolitan Opera house,spe-
;al seats have been placed on the
ower floor ofathe giant theater to ac-
ommodate the large numbers who
wish to see the show.
SC A CHRISTMASFUND

MICHIGAN WOMEN
WIN DEBATE HEREJ
Fleming Acts As Judge of Contest;
Dean Hamiliton Presides for
Mrs., Burton
To'WN ER-SlERILING BILL IS
ARGUED WITH OHIO STATE
Michigan's team was awarded the
decision over the team representing
Ohio State university in the second
annual woman's debate of the Michi-
gan-Ohio league held in University
Hall last night.
The question was: "Resolved, that
the Towner-sterslingbill should be en-
acted." Michigan upholding the aff-
irmative side wasurepresented by
Catherine Stafford, '24, Florence Full-
er, '25 and Clara Lau, '25. The Ohio
negative team was composed of Flor-
ence Worrell, Ruth L. Rice, and Fran-
ces Wagstaff.
The debate proved spirited and in-
teresting. Each speaker Was given
twelve minutes for her constructive
argument and five minutes for her
rebuttal..'
Michigan advocated the enaction of
the Towner-Sterling bill because:
certain conditions in the educational
system demand a remedy; this rem-
edy must be national in scope: the
Towner-Sterling bill provides an eff-I
ective plan of state and national co-
operation. The negative debaters op-
posed the hill, maintaining that there
is no need for so radical a change,
that,the bill is faulty and defective as
a federal aid method, and that such a'
plan involves a dangerous tendency
toward federal control of education.
Prof. Edwin G. Fleming of Miami
university acted as judge of the de-
bate. Dean Hamilton presided as
chairman because of the illness of
Mrs. Marion L. Burton.
Columbus, Dec. 7-Michigan's neg-
ative team composed of Joanna De-
Witt, Mary McCully, and Elizabeth
VanValskenburgh defeated Ohio State
university here tonight in a debate
on the Sterling-Towner bill.

BALDWN MINISTRY
LOSES CONTROLOF
LABOR AND LBERAL VOTES
OUTNUMBER CONSERVA-
TIVE BY 90
EXPECT RESIGNATION
OF PREMIER BALDWIN
Returns Indi'ate Election of Eight
Women to New Pairlment:
Gain of Three
London, Dec. 7.-(By A. P.)-With,
the exception of a few seats in the
Orkney and Shetland islands and some
of the university returns which have
not yet been received, the new House
of Commons is complete. At 11 o'clock
tonight the returns from yesterday's
general elections showed the standing
of the parties as follows:
Conservative, 259; Labor Party, 185;
Liberals, 148; other parties, 10.
Thus in the new House, the gov-
ernment will win the minority in the
neighborhood of 90 votes as against-
the combined opposition parties. These.
figures, however, may vary somewhat,
according as different compilers re-1
gard scattered members as belonging.
to one or another of the big parties.
It is understood that Premier Bald-'
win has summoned a meeting of the
cabinet for Monday to consider the sit-
uation and that a meeting of the Con-
servative party to debate its next step,
and possibly to elect a new leader to
replace Mr. Baldwin, whose policy the
country has rejected, will resign and
that, in any case, owing to the unseat-'
ing of several of the ministers, re-
construction of the government is un-
avoidable unless, as seems extremely
likely, the whole cabinet should re-
sign. . :
London, Dec: 7.-(By A. P.)-Eight
women will sit in the new Parliament,
it was indicated by election returns1
tonight, as compared with three form-
erly there. .Mrs. Margaret Wintring-
ham, liberal, for the South division of
Lincolnshire and Mrs. Margaret Philp-
son for the Berwick-on Tweed division
of Northumberland; were re-elected.
Lady Astor defeated her opponent.
These will be joined in the new Parlia-
ment by the Duchess of Atoll, con-
servative, Lady Tarrington, liberal,
Susan Lawrence, Margaret Bonfield,
labor, and Dorothea Juwson, labor.
ENTERTAI VAR ITA
DETRIT CLUB TONIGHT
11!
Michigan's undefeated Varsity foot-
ball team will be entertained by the
University of Michigan club of De-
troit in the annual football bust. which
will celebrate the close of another
. Maize and Blue season of victories.
The affair will be held at 8 o'clock at
the Board of Commerce in Detroit.
The delegation going into Detroit
will include the "M" men, reserves,
freshman letter men, coaches and
trainers, Varsity band and cheerlead-
ors and officials of the Athletic as-
Isociation.
The special interurban cars for the
party will leave the depot at Noon
today for Detroit, returning after the
bust tonight. It is expected that
Imany students will go in during the
day to attend the affair..
At Detroit the party will march to
the Capitol theater from the station,
led by the Varsity band. They will
be the guests of the Detroit alumni
at the matinee performance at that
theater.
All "M" men and coaches will dine
j at the University club at 6 o'clock.
Another dinner will be held at the
same time at the Board of Commerce

for the rest of the party. The footballf
bust will begin at 8 o'clock at the
latter place.
Songs and yells will open the prog-
gram. speeches will be given by
Coach Fielding 11. Yost and other
members of the Michigan coaching
staff and prominent Detroit alumni.
Moving pictures of the team in action
will be flashed on the screen. Gen-
eral admission to the bust is $1.

NOTED EDITOR IS GRADUATE
- UNIVERSITY LAW
SCHOOL

Speaks Today

OF

Willis John Abbot
Editor of the Christian Science Mon-
itor who will speak at the noon lunch-i
eon at the Union today for delegates
to the Western Gonference editorial
association convention.
SET FOR TONIGHTI
Architect To Be Guest Of Honor;
Booth of Detroit News
Will Speak
MEETING WILL BE SIGNAL FOR
GATHERING OF PROMINENT MEN
A reception and dinner, to be given
by the architectural college in honor
of Eliel Saarinen, noted Finnish Arch-
itect who is teaching a class in ad-
vanced design here will be given this
afternoon and evening. The recept-
ion will be held at 3:30 o'clock in the
corridors of the Architectural college
when many of the more prominent
works of Mr. Saarinen will be on dis-
play. An opportunity to meet him
will also be given at this time.
Following the reception will be a
pageant, held in the assembly room of
the Union and depicting the develop-
ment of art throughout the ages. It
is to be made up of students of archi-
teoture, and is under the direction
of Henry S. Booth, '24. A dinner inl
the main dining room of the Union4
I 1 follow at 7.:30 o'clock when Mr.!
.George G. Booth, of Detroit, will make
the address. Mr. Booth is president
of the Evening News association, and
gave the, talk at the first meeting of
the Western Conference Editorial as-
sociation last night. He has not yet
made announcement of the subject for
his talk. President Marion L. Bur-
-ton, President emeritus Harry B. Hut-
chins, Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of the
Engineering college, and Ralph Booth,
of Detroit will be the guests of honor,
while Prof. Emil Lorch of the archi-
tectural college will preside.
More than 200 students are expect-
ed to attend, and a special delegation
of eighty is to come out from Detroit.
Many prominent architects from the
various towns throughout Michigan
and Ohio are also to make trips to
Ann Arbor for the occasion.
Playmakers Give
Miniature Comedy

YOST WILL SPEAK AT I
COMBINED GATHERING
Editorial Conference De'egates to See
"Cotton Stockings" This
Afternoon
Visiting editors will be addressed at
luncheon today at 12:15 o'clock in
room 318-20 of the Union by Willis
John Abbot, '84L, editor of the Christ-
ian Science Monitor. .
Mr. Abbot became managing editor
of the Chicago Times in 1892 and has
been engaged in journalistic workj
since that date. He became editor of
the Christian Science Monitor in 1922.-
Meet at 9 O'clock Today
Events on the program of the Con-
ference for today start at 9:00 o'clock
with a joint meeting of editors and
business managers in the reading room
on the second floor of the Union. This
will be the only business meeting of
all of the delegates collectively and
finishes the actual work of the conven-
tion for this year. At this meeting
Coach Fielding H. Yost will deliver a
short address before the representa-.
tives of Big Ten journalism.
Word was received last night from
Maj. John Griffith, commissioner of
intercollegiate athletics in the West-(
er Conference, that he would be un-
able to speak at the joint meeting this
morning due to an engagement to talk
before the Big Ten club at Pittsburgh
tonight. This noon, Major Griffith is
speaking in Cleveland and by stopping
in Ann Arbor, he would be unable to
fulfill his engagements. Major Griffith
regrets his inability to attend the con-
vention meeting and sends his best
wishes to the delegates. He will be in
Ann Arbor Monday and Tuesday with
the Physical Educational council of
the state at its meeting here at that
time.
To Witness Union Opera
l Following the luncheon at the Union,
visiting editors will be guests at the
matinee performance of the Union
opera "Cotton Stockings." Th'e per-
formance starts at 2:00 o'clock at the
Whitney theater.
The visiting journalists were guests
of various fraternities yesterday at
luncheon and at 2:00 o'clock theifirst
meetings of the convention were held
in the Union. Managing editors and!
business managers held their first ses-,
sions simultaneously in separateI
rooms of the Union. Discussion of
numerous matters bearing on the var-
ious phases of journalistic work were
held by the two divisions.

BO'OTH CALLS SERVING MANKIND
PURPOSE OF MODERN NEWSPAPE
A8BBOT SPEAKfS AT LUNCHN TOI

OUTLINES PRINCIPLES LE1
TO JOURNALISTIC
SUCCESS
MADE BUSINESS MANA(
OF DETROIT NEWS A'
Asserts Crimes and Sensational
cles in Papers Undesired
by Public
"Serving mankind in a constri
way; shucking away the destri
bad things and using them only
means to overcome the bad" i
purpose of the newspaper in the
ent era of civilization, Georg
Booth, president of the Detroit
ning News association, declare
fore the third annual banquet c
Western Conference Editorial as
tion last night at the Union.
"There is one thing that the p
of today demand," Mr. Booth
"and that is reliable knowledge.
lishers say that they must giv
people what they want. They d
their papers to crime and the s
tional type of newspaper aricles.
is not what the people want.
what they will take the easiest.
Facts Most Important
"Current events, of all kinds, w
in a reliable manner; acts and
and facts, that is what the :
want. Today we are living in a
where there is a hunger for k
edge. The efficiency age is paE
few years ago efficiency was th
word of business, of newspap
everything. But it was talke
death. Every branch of the i
paper today must be tested as t
knowledge that it Imparts."
"This service may not alone t:
plied to the news column of a m
paper. The advertising, the cil
tion, every branch of the jourw
enterprise may be tested, and. s
conform 'with this one thing. T.
this. alone can the service tha
public Ademands be attained."
Mr. looth,. speaking from yes
experience as owner and ublisi
a series of the most prominent
papers of the state, outlined t
delegates-the principles that ha
his journalistic attempts to the si
that they have attained, He tC
his start in the newspaper worl
Business Manager at 24
"When I was 24 years old I wa
denly told that I had been plac
business manager ,of the Detroit
fing News," he said. "I went int
office with none of the exper
that should precede the respons:
of such a posftlon. In one we
the cashier's cage and, In the ci
tion department and in the sal
'partment and as business man
had to learn those things that
of a newspaper such as the New
then, a success.
"There was a radical wrong4
paper' then. - An individual ed
policy was finding its place I
columns. The editor was expr
his personal feelings to the ete
he was causing the downfallh
paper. 'He was not using the ii
of obtaining good will feelings b
will processes"
Mr. Booth told how he stepp
and bought a paper in Grand I
in order' that he could emb
actual form the theories that i
devised in his period as businesE
ager of the Detroit EvenIng
The thing that made the vent
success, according toMr. Booti
the idea that newspapers we
only valuable to their owners
tangible viewpoint but from a
will aim. "The good will is wor
times the tangible values," he a
Young Man Has R"sponsIbili
It is upon the young man of
that the responsibility of pres
the newspaper rests, Mr. Boot]
"The executives of a newspaper
be changed every 10 years," h
"It is the only way to pres'erve 1
stitution of the newspaper.
men grow out of touch with the
The day is changing while the
I behind.

"The young man has ideals," h
d on. "The young man is a drea
has more ambition, more of ti
to do than the older man. The
up in themselves the importa
dany cause."
S Preceding Mr. Booth, PresideD
P ion L. Burton stressed to the
, gates the importance that the pr
5 of Mr. Booth had at the meeting
t ; are signally honored to have Mr.
with us," he said. "He is not

TILLEY WILL INTRODUCE,
VAHCHEL LINDSAY MONDAY

PLOTTERS SENTENCED
RERGOOLL KIDNAVCHR
Mosbach, Baden, Dec. 7.-(By A. P.)
-Corliss Hooven Griffis, of Hamilton,
Ohio, was sentenced today to serve 21
months in prison for conspiring to
kidnap Grover Cleveland Bergdoll, the
American draft evader. Carl 'Sterber
of Paris, was sentenced to 18 months;
Faust Gagarin, a Russian prince, to
8 months, and Eugene Dictor Nelson,
of Chicago to 3 months imprisonment
for their share in the .plot which the
group attempted to carry out at Eber-
bach in August.
All the defendants will have sub-
tracted from their terms the period of
their incarceration before the trial,
and Nelson was set free today as the
court considered his term had been
served. Gri s also was fined two
trillion marks.
On pronouncing the verdict the
presiding judge admitted Griffis was

DRIVE GOES OVER-TOPI
Funds more than necessary for the G
Students Christian Association Christ-
mas party were obtained when the
financial drive carried on Thursday
went over the top. More than 500
tags were sold by the students who
were stationed at various parts of the
campus with buckets.
Those who participated in the drive
include David Bromberg, '25, chair-
man, Milton Staub, '26, R. C. Straub,
,25, Victor Prescott, '27, Alexander
Campbell, '27, G. D. Thompson, '26,
Robert Hooper, '27, William Ruble,
'27, J. A. Whitworth, '27, G. M. Sand-i
ers, '27, K. E. Kennedy, '26, Charles'
Schumacher, '27, and Thomas Now-
tan, '27.
I The party at 3 o'clock Tuesday for
the 200 needy children which is to be
given with the funds obtained through
the drive, has been postponed until
3 o'clock Wednesday, due to the fact
that Lane Hall auditorium was sched-
uled for another affair Tusday after-
noon. The Christmas tree for the
campus will be decorated this week-
end.
Sailors Do Not Swim

Prof. Morris P. Tilley of the Eng-
lish edpartment has been selected to
introduce Vachel Lindsay, the dis-
tinguished poet, Monday night in Hill
auditorium. This is the first number
on the annual Whimsies lecture
course.
No subject has been announced for
Mr. Lindsay's lecture, but it will prob
ably consist, for the mots part, of a
discussion of his own style of poetry
in comparison with the prevalent
modes of writing verse., It is ex-{
pected that he will read some of h
own works, two of which, "The Congo"1
and "General William Booth EnterI
into Heaven," are especially well-1
known.

i

In their quaint little playhouse way
out on Spring street, before a capacity
crowd, kneeling, sitting and standing,
sometimes uncomfortable, but always
interested, the Ann Arbor Playmakers
presented a program which marks a
distinct innovation in amateur stage
circles in this city.
The former Dodo players took hold
of a practically new idea, a minature
musical comedy, and made a real suc-
cess of it. Besides this there was
presented a cleverly lined playlet, "A
Pessimists' Paradise." This two-act
comedy was written by Oakley John-
son and directed by himself and Mary
Johnson, with the assistance of Jose-
ph H. Epstein, '25, Lodge D. Stau-
bach, '24, and Hamann Lyon, '24. It
was presented by cast number two last
night and will be repeated with a
duplicate cast tonight and with the
last night's cast tomorrow. Two ex-
cellent characterizations were given
by H J. McFarlan and Lodge I).
Staubach, '24 in the roles of the pol-
itical and his right-hand man, respect-
ively. R. B. Henderson, '26, played
the part of the pessimist.
The "alleged musical comedy" was
entitled "The Iron Man" and had quite
a typical plot centering around the
royalty of an imaginary "Land of
monkey-wrenches." It was written
by Lowell J. Carr, grad, and the music.
and direction are credited to Forman
G. Brown.-
The entire program will be repeat-t

William B. Etheridge, '25, was el-
ected manager of the 1924 Varsity
football team last night by, the com-
mittee on appointments, composed of
the athletic director and the manager
and captain of the 1923 squad. Ether-
idge has 'worked with the football'
team for the past two years, being
appointed an assistant manager at
the end of the tryout period of his
sopohmore year which position he
has held up to the present time.
Edward N. Hartwick, '25 was made
next year's cross country manager
by a vote of the Athletic Board of
Directors yesterday afternoon. Hart-
wick worked this fall as assistant
cross country manager, having been
appointed to this position in his soph-
omore year.
The other appointments passed by
the board yesterday are as follows:
football assistant managers, H. .G.
Clark, '26, 0. C. Gorenflo, '26P, Geo.
H. Harrington, '26, J. G. Donaldson,
'26 and R. S. Weidemann, '26, alter-
nate; cross country assistants, H. G.
Messer, '26, H. N. Ehrlich, '26, E. J.
Seifert, '26 and R. D. Buick, '26.
All appointments will be brought
up for confirmation before the Board
in Control of Athletics today.
Steamship Lines Lay Tax
Manila, Dec. 7.-The Associated
Steamship lines have added 25 cents
a bale to the freight rate on hemp
from the Philippines to America,
making the rate, effective Jan. 1, $2.25
a bale to Atlantic and $1.25 to Pacific
ports.

1
i

DO YOU KNOW?

1

That Voltaire, in his old age,
drank fifty cups of coffee a day;
that Adam Smith, the political
economist, was absent-minded;
that Beethoven hated etiquette;
that Ben. Franklin ,had a plate
of bread and cheese by his side
when studying, "to repair men-

Sophomore Lits
Plan Union Dance
Tickets for the Premiere Dansant
to be held from 2:30 to 5:30 o'clock
this afternoon at the Union are on
sale at Wahr's and Graham's book-j
stores. The dance, which is sponsor-
ed by the sophomore literary class, ist
the first large social event of the
year for the class. Mrs. S. B. John-
son and Mrs. Herman Keene will act
as patronesses for the affair.
Ted Rhodes' orchestra will furnishj

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