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December 06, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-12-06

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THE WEATHER
RAIN OR SNOW; NO TEM.
PERATURE CHANGE

Vi-i

Ar
.Alt r t 0 a n
14

at, l

ASSOCIATED PRES
LEASED WIRE SERI
MEMBER
WESTEN BCONFERE
EDITORIAL ASSOCIA'

VOL. XXXIV. No. 63

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1923

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE

+ . a r r r rr wrrw YWw1

. . i

BIG TEN EDITORS
MEETTOMORROW
FOR CONFERENCE
JOURNALISTS OPEN A N N U A L
PFESS CONVENTION
HERE
PROMINENTJOURNALISTS
TO SPEAK A T BANQUET
Meeting to Discuss Technicalities and
Important News
Topics
Delegates from all the conference
universities are expected to arrive to-
morrow morning for the annual con-
vention of the Western Conference
Editorial association to be held here
tomorrow and Satuday. It is estimated
that 25 delegates will attend the con-
vention,
Registration oaf the delegates will
take place from 9 o'clock to 12 o'clock
in the morning at the Union, following
which they will lunch at various fra-
ternities. At 2 o'clock in the afternoon
the business managers and managing
editors of university publications will!
convene in separate sessions. The
meetings will continue throughout the'
afternoon.
Banquet Tomorrow Night
Tomorrow night at 6:30 o'clock the'
members of the association will gather
in the Union for their third annual
banquet. At this banquet the Board in
Control of Student Publications and
members of the faculty of the journal-
ism department of the University will
be guests. George G. Booth, president
of the Detroit Evening News associa-
tion and President Marion L. Burton
will be the principal speakers of the
evening.l
Saturday morning at 9 -o'clock the
business managers and managing ,edi-
tors will meet in a joint session to,
discuss their common problems. At
12:15 o'clodk the delegates will be the
guests at the closing luncheon at
which Willis John Abbot, '84L, editor
of, the Christian Science Monitor, will
speak. The members of the .journal-
ism faculty and members of the Board'
in Control of Student Publications will
also attend this luncheon.
In the afternobn the delegates will
attend the matinee performance of the
eighteenth annual Michigan opera,
"Cotton Stockings," at the Whitney
theatre.
To Discuss Prless Wire
It is expected that the discussion ofI
a conference press 'wire will be one of]
the most important features of the
convention. Discussion of athletic rul-;
ings and other inter-collegiate affairs
will probably also be held. The busi-
ness managers will discuss methods of
conducting advertising campaigns and
general business problems.
The meetings of the convention Will
probably be conducted by a chairman'
as the association is technically with-
out a head at the present time. This
is due to the fact that the convention
which regularly should have been held
last May at Northwestern university
was cancelled on account of a fatal
hazing case there.
Banquet Planned
By Campus Club

Dancing Features Newest Of
MichiganUnion Productions

With the grace and charm of a Foll-
ies girl, Lienel E. Ames, '24, as Suz-
anne, danced "her" way through "Cot-
ton Stockings," this year's Union Op-
era, at the Whitney last night.
Ames leaves little to be desired in
any way, and makes an excellent danc-
er for the choruses which he leads.
But Ames is far from being alone in
ability to dance. In fact, it is . the
dancing of the entire cast and chorus
which goes to make "Cotton Stock-
ings" the success that it is.
Throughout the play the audience is
thrilled by the different styles of Terp-
sichore which are achieved. All of
the dance numbers are fine but some
of them are outstanding in their
quaintness and oddity. Foremost
among these is the "Waltz" which
opensgthe second act. This includes
two parts, the first, by eight men, ex-

hibiting the present tendencies of
jazz dancing, with the other, led by
Ames, of Spanish character. The odd-
ity of both numbers makes them keenly
appreciated.
Another which was thoroughly en-
joyed was the Russian dance, which
was greatly enhanced by the costumes
worn by the four men who took part
in the number.
"Sleigh Bells" and the Clown dance
are also worthy of more than passing
mention, both attracting by their*
uniqueness, which was increased in
the former by unusual lighting effects.
George Hoffman, '24, and Howard
Welch, '24, presented an exceptional
dance called the "Fastastique." Both
men are graceful, with recognized
ability and exhibited perfect tempo in
their novelty number.
R. N.B.

SSTUDENTS RESINI

Football Men Protest

Expulsion Of

Taylor and DeMerrell F rom
Society
PRESIDENT SHAW TO MAKE
INVESTIGATION OF AFFAIRJ
Lansing, Dec. 5.-(ByA.P.)-The re-
signations of two members of the
Michigan Aggie football team, offered 1
in protest against the expulsion fromi
their college society of Maurice Tay-
lor, captain of the team, and Richard
DeMerell, were accepted by the Hes-
perian society today. They were Roll-
ie Richards, quarterback and H. A.
Robinson, end. Eight other members
have tendered their resignations, but
they have not so far, been accepted.
Taylor and DeMerell were charged
by members of the society with hav-
ing broken up a college dancing party'
last week. It was alleged that they
were intoxicated and brought liquor
to the affair, offering it to students.
They refused to leave. it was claimed,
and the orchestra had to be sent away
and the hall darkened an hour before
the party was scheduled to close.
R. S. Shaw, president of M. A. C.,
announced today that he will under-
take a personal investigation of the
affair. It was rumored that some
students might be expelled or sus-
pended from the college.
NA11Y BOARD MEETS TO
PLAN FOR POLR TRIP

COOLIDGEVITR
CALLS FOR ACTIONI
South Da)kotans Indorse McAdoo
and LaFollette in Proposal
Convention
FOIU) AND JOHNSON ARE
ELIMINATED IN BALLOT
Washington, Dec. 5.-The victory of
President Coolidge in the South Dak-
ota proposal convention resulted to-
day in bringing near a definite indi-
cation of the President's position as
to the 1924 Presidential campaign.
Whitehouse officials said that prob-
ably within a day or two acknowled-
gement would be made of the conven-
tion's action and this is expected to
go a long way toward disclosing Mr.
Coolidge's politicalplan.
Action Not Final
That the convention's action is not
final, in as much as the South Dak-
ota delegation at the 1924 national4
convention is subject to choice in the
state primary March 25, was said to
be realized by Mr Coolidge's rfiends,
but they pointed to the convention
endorsement as significant of repub-
lican sentiment in South Dakota as to
the record thus far made by Mr.
Coolidge.

LITERRY FACULT
AD-OPTS STRINGENT
GRDAINROU
C AVERAGE IN ALL WORK TO BE
REQUIRED OF ALL
STUDENTS
ACTION GOES BEFORE
REGENTS IN DECEMBER
Ruling to Take Effect in i'ebruary
192 if Accepted; Frayer
Gives Report
Requirements for graduation will
become more stringent if the action
taken by the faculty of the literary
college at its regular monthly meet-
ing in the lecture room of the general
library is accepted by the Board of
Regents at its December meeting
The first section of the require-
ments for graduation from the liter-
ary college was restated to read as
follows: "The degree of Bachelor of;
Arts is conferred upon students who;
have earned 120 hours of credit or
more together with at least as many
points as hours." The new ruling
will take effect with those who grad-
uate in February 1925 and thereafter.
The requirement which is now in
effect necessitates only that the stu-
dent earn 120 points, no matter how
many hours work he has completed
during his college course. According
to Dr. A. G. Hall, registrar of thej
University this means that a student
may complete his work with less than
a C average if he takes more than the
requirednumber of hours. With the
adoption of the new rule no student
will be graduated from the literary
college unless he has at least a C av-
erage in all his work.
Prof. W. A. Frayer of the history I
department gave a report of the work I
of the committee from the faculty
which has been working for the past
two years investigating junior coll-
eges in Michigan. Other general mat-
ters of routine business were brought
up for consid-3ration at the meeting.
B asiig Wcrk
Causes Inquiry
Blasts which have rocked Ann Ar-
bor for two days were located yester-
day afternoon after a number of people
had phoned, inquiring anxiously what
was meant by the bomb-like reports.i
On the corner of South and East Uni-
versity avenues just north of the
model high school a number of large
cement foundations stand a foot or so
above the ground level. Blasters have
been at work for more than 48 hours
attempting to remove this concrete.
On account of the proximity of the
high school and residences only a
small charge can be used. The two
assistants chip holes into the founda-
tion after which the blaster cuts the
desired amount of explosive from a 10
inch stick of dynamite and fastens to
it a six inch copper tipped fuse. This
is lighted and in about 40 esconds the
intonation follows. The average
amount of concrete displaced by these
explosions is less than three cubic
feet.
On account of the small charges
used, it was estimated that the work
will require several more days at least.
j F. LODGE AT 0NQE

CONGRESS SETTLES~
AFTER ELECTIONS,
TO HEARCOOLIDGE
GILLETTE REGAINS SPEAKERSHIP
I'OLLOWING TWO DAY
UE ADLOCK
HOUSES TOORGANILE
COMMITTEES FOR YEAR
President Coolidge Will Address
Congrss in Person
Today
Washington, Dec. 5.-(By A. PJ-
The Sixty-eighth congress was organ-
ized today with the breaking of the
two dty deadlock in the House over
the speakership, and it will receive
President Coolidge's first annual mes-
sage tomorrow.
The President will address congress
in person at 12-30 o'clock at a joint
session in the House chamber.
Although congress is now ready to
function little can be done in the way
of legisl.tior until afte the Cnristmas
holidays. Committees in both the
House and Senate have yet to be or-.
ganized, and they must pass on all
important measures before there can
be action by either house.
The break leading to the reelection
of Speaker Gillette on the first ballot
today came after republican insur-
gents had satisfied themselves that
there would be opportunity next
month to offer amendments to House
rules. Given this assurance on the
floor by Representative Ltlngworth,
of Ohio, the Republican leader, the
group which for eight ballots had sup-
ported either Representative CooperI
of Wisconsin, or Madden, of Illinois,.
changed almost solidly to Gillette giv-
ing him a majority of eight votes.
The result showed: Gillette, 215;
Garrett, democrat, 197; Madden, Re-
publican, 2,
The senate meeting at noon again
was unable to function pending or-
ganization of the House, and remained
in session just two minutes.
Before adjourning the House re-
elected its regular officers, adopted the
joint resolution providing for notifica-
tion of the president -that congress
was ready to receive communication
from him and a resolution under
which the rules in force in the Sixty-
.eventh congress shall govern it until
January 14.1
ANNAPOLIS HEAD AGREES
Annapolis, Dec. 5.-Rear Admiral
Wilson, superintendent of the Naval
Academy, today gave his assent to
the trip by the middy grid men to
Pasadena, New Year's day for a post
season game with the University of
Washington.
The itinerary for the trip which
was - mapped out several weeks ago
will stand. This calls for a jaunt
i across the continent via the Balti-
more and Ohio to Chicago, returning
over the Sante Fe syste to New
Orleans and Washington. The grid-
iron warriors will have nearly a day
in Chicago and will also visit the
Grand Canyon.
The entire journey will consume
about two weeks. The pa'ty will
leave Annapolis Christmas day and
is due at Pasadena, December 30.
Leaving Pasadena, Jan. 2 they will ar-
rive at Annapolis five days later.

Nation Will Hear
President Speak
Washington, Dec. 5.-(By A. P.)-
The voice of President Coolidge, ad-
dressing congress tomorrow will be
carried over a greater portion of the
IUnited States, and will be heard by
more people than the voice of any man
in history.
Arrangements were completed to-
night for broadcasting the president's
address as delivered in the chamber of
the House of Representatives through
six powerful radio stations and it is
expected by the engineers in charge
that fully a million people will hear
Mr. Coolidge speak. The broadcasting
will begin at 12 o'clock noon, eastern
standard time, when the House meets
and, priorato the appearance of the
President at about 12 :30 o'clock, the
time will be taken up by an expert
announcer who will describe the as-
sembling of the Senate and House in
joint session, the appearance of thel
galleries and the various formalities
incident to the president's appearance.
DISCONTENT STIRS
GERMAN PEASANTS1
Seven Killed and Thirty Wounded in
Uprising at West
Phalia .
UNEMPLOYED STONE POLICE;
FRENCH TROOPS INTERVENE
Berlin, Dec. 5.-(By A.P.)--Seven
persons were killed and 30 wounded
in a clash today between unemployed
and the police at Wanne, West Phalia.
The unemployed, discontented over
the amount paid them as unemploy-
ed dolls, tried to storm the town hall.
They attacked the police with stones
and revolvers whereupon the police
returned their fire. Frenchi troops
finally restored order.
STATE PROTESTS MOVING
OFDABLDVETERANS

W'ISCONSI"N REGE1
CENSURES RHOD
HENRY CASHMAN -FLAYS FAMU
PRACTICE AS MEANS 0t
PROPAGANDA
BEAL RAISES IDEALS
BEHIND SCHOLARS
Objectors Claim British Influ
American Students Against
United States
Madison, Wis., Dec. 5.-(By A. I
An attack on Rhodes scholarships
registered by Henry Cashman of
mark, Wis., member of the Unive
of Wisconsin board of regents an4
state legislature, at a meeting of
regents today. Mr. Cashman decl
that he is opposed to the Unive
accepting any more Rhodes sch
ships,
"The object of Rhodes scholari
is to extend British rule and ultim
to recover the United States,"
Cashman said. "This scheme m
traitors of some of America's f
young men, and for this reason1
opposed to the Universityaccel
such scholarships."
No action. was taken by the B
on the matter.
"If the University of Wisconsin
any extra allotment of Rhodes si
arships the University of Michigan
be glad to accept them," Regent Ji
E. Beal, of Ann Arbor, declared
night on learning of the reported
jections made by Regent Henry (
man of the Wisconsin institutic
Rhodes scholarships.
"I havej always believed that
Rhodes scholarships made for a
ter understanding between nati
stated Regent Beal. "We have
complement of the Rhodes scholar
here in the Riggs fellowship, .
Lovell, of the University of Loi
England, having come here this fi
study Am(rican history. We wa:
.W elt-~tmlu Kw hr.+ n..nniUL1U1B ULhfsr

Washington, Dec. 5.-The

special

planning board for the navy polar ex-
pedition held its first meeting today
with Rear Admiral William A. Moffett,
chief of the navy air service, presiding.
Organization of the board was perfect-
ed, the only absent member being
Commander Fitzhugh dreen, who is ex-
pected to be present when the board
continues its work tomorrow.
After a conference with Secretary
Denby, the Board members got to work
at assembling data upon which the
date of the flight will be determined.
For that purpose, Lieut. F. W. Reich-
elderfer, chief meteoroligical officer of
the bureau of aeronautics, was called
upon for all available data as to
weather conditions in the polar re-
gions,
SCIENTIST CONVLENION
TO REEL DISCOVERIES

Pierre, S. D., Dec: 5.-(By A.P.)-'
President Coolidge, William Gibbs Mc-
Adoo and Robert M. LaFollette, Unit-
ed States senator for Wisconsin, were
ihdorsed as presidential standard1
bearers for the Republican, .Demo-
cratic and Farmer-Labor parties. re-
spectively, at state proposal meetings
here last night, the selectnsoishrdl
here last night, the selections in turn
being made over Hiram Johnson, Unit-
ed States Senator for California, and
Henry Ford, who was named by both
Democrats and Farmer-Laborites.
Endorsement Unanimous
After President Coolidge had been
named by the Republican proposal1
men by a vote of 50,379 to 27,340 for
Senator Johnson, the indorsement was
made unanimous by a rising vote.
In the Democratic meeting Mr. Ford
got 5,072 votes to Mr. McAdoo's 39, l
018, and the Farmer-Labor vote was:
For Ford, 7,247, and for La Follette.
31,999.
Capper Chosen.!
Arthur Capper, United States sen-
ator for Kansas, was chosen for sec-
and place on the Republican ticket
and the Democrats chose James W.
Gerard, of New Yok.
LetsA Fortune
In Gems Escape

----- aestablish batter relations between
Lansing, Dec 5.-(By A.P.)--A res- tions and I blieve that such gifts
olution of protest against the order the Rhodes and Riggs scholars
of Director General Hines directing funds are aiding in the effort."
the removal of disabled war veterans
from Michigans hospitals was adopted
by the state senate today. It was off- jH ISTMAS SAL
ered by representative August Gans-
ser, of Bay City, a war veteran. I
The resolution read, in part: "The'T
American Legion hospital, near Battle i CekIa EFITnREDeiH(
experts of the government to be idealIChristmas seals have been sen
for the care and rehabiliation of such all fraternities on the campus I
disabled war veterans as are placed E special committee of the S. C. A.
there. Medical experts are agreed j have been asked to sell the stamp
that tuberculosis patients are best their members. Sororities have b
served near their own homes where 'subscribed likewise by the Y. W. (
they may have friendly contact with The funds derived from the sal
their relatives and friends. We pro- these seals will be added to the
test the removal of disabled war vet- Cross tuberculosis fund. The Chi
erans from Michigan hospitals and mas seal movement was first sta
} petition the director of the veterans in 1904 by the National Tubercu
bureau at Washington to revoke such !association. Supporters of the m
an order." ment included a mere handful loc
Copies of the resolution will be sent around the Atlantic seaboard. T
to Michigan congressmen: and Prest- there is a well organized associa
dent Coolidge. in every state of the Union.
-- In the year 1904 the death ratef
E lectriC Chair tuberculosis was 202.6 for 10
I people; and now it is below 100.
Testers Scarce I suredly," says Prof. John Sund

0
Es
'f

Traverse City club met last night at
Lane Hall for the purpose of planning,
a Michigan banquet to be given at'
Traverse City during vacation.
A re-organization of the alumni as-
sociation is planned for that time.
There are now over 100 graduates liv-
ing there.
Calls for Relief
Rome, Dec. 5.-Minister of public
works Carnazza informed the cabinet
today that the fatalities in the flood
of Saturday in the Bergamo valley ag-
gregated about 500 and that the ma-
terial damage was estimated at be-
tween 130,000,000 and 150,000,000 lire.
He urged that heasures be taken to
indemnify peasants for losses sustain.
ed or to aid them in re-establishing
their farms and businesses.
The cabinet unanimously approved
the suggestion of the minister.
OPERA
The Michigan Union Opera is
better this year than ever. The1
sparkling humor, the clever f
dancing, the gorgeous costumes,
aided by the unique lighting
AfaP-ax, m a i rt a real nl (-1t.

Manila, Dec. 5.-(By A. P.)-Ordin-
arily there are five applicants for every
government job in the Philippine Is-
lands, but one position that of neces-
sity has been created is going begging.
No one seems to want it. The duties
of the position are to test the electric
chair, which has arrived from the
United States and which will be used
to carry out death sentences. This
form '6f capital' punishment succeeds
hanging, which has been prohibited by
a law which went into effect recently.
There are four or five prisoners in
Bilibid prison waiting to expiate their

4
C
t
i
t
r
4

Cincinnati, Dec 5-(By A.P.)-Im--
portant discoveries "which will gor
beyond the present scope of science" 1
will be announced at the seventy-sev-
enth convention here of the Americanl
Association for the Advancement of4
Science according to Prof. Harris
Hancock of the convention committee'
Leading scientists of America and 1
Canada will be represented in the 15
sectional meetings representing all
phases and branches of science. The
sesions will be held at the University
of Cincinnati, December27-January 2.
Rabbi Speaks On
World Problems!
Rabbi Berkowitz of the Beth El
Temple in Detroit gave a short talk
on world problems last night at Lane
Hall. He stressed the need of apply-
ing the fact that all through the ages

London, Dec 5--(By A.P.-The man
responsible for the opening of the Kim-
berley diamond fields, in South Africa,I
sold the fields for ? $2,500, believing
them exhausted after having removed

Frank T. Lodge, well known Dec-
troit lawyer and doctor, gave the ad-
dress at a banquet of the senior med-{
ical class last night at Joe Parker's
cafe. The banquet was attended by
more than 80 members of .the class.

HINES REVsEs BUREAU
TO HASTEN SETTLEMENTS

several thousand stones. The fields Carl Pierce, '24M, acted as toastmas-s,-crimes wrt teiives t
have yielded diamonds ever since, and ter. Wahntn(DcI.Cmpeer ne prospective applicant for the
organization of the central board of ap- position of tester cross-examined the'
had dwi Wilia Steetr, ho i "It is impossible to realise~ the vast1 peals of the veterans bureau in order poficialsofreardingrthe-workineo the
here recently at the age of 89, re- number of legal cases which require pe the eran aui officials regarding the working of the
tained his property he would have a knowledge of both medicine and x chair. When informed there would be a
been one of the richest men in the law," said Mr. Lodge. "The need for of claims was announced today byn danger if the chair is not in working I
world. just such exact knowledge has nat- =Director Hines as one of the first steps order he promptly asked: "But what
worl. ustrally resulted in the expert wit- in a general readjustment of bureau od he rork ed "But what
_____________reutdilteepr i activities. Another change announced if the chair works?" When told whatt
FARM ness.in a organization was the creation of a probably would happen he departed
BRON 1 "He who enters upon a case in am g ,in a hecetino without filing his application.
UUmwhole-hearted anner is bound toI finance service, with separate divisions
come out ahead of the iractitioner o dispersing and accounting, headed
fi- - enaca rmnraiedirector of the bureau. Tme rrimaivr,
ASSOCIATION AT M. A. C. whol~osfirst pontheossible f-by Harold7 W. Breining as assistant, LI T APPING snnca eueaio. ietroftebra.Th rmr ~
Mr, Lodge has held the position of purpose of the general plan of re-1
Lansing, Dec. 5.-"The thing that medical lawyer for the city of Detroit organization ,Director Hines explained, T 311111
America needs is to stop guessing and for the past six years, and is consid- is to relieve him of much detail and
base her decisions on real thought," ! ered ona of the foremost authorities permit him to give greater attention
Dr. Marion L. Burton, president of the on legal cases of a medical nature. to the planning and controlling of the Special To The Daily.
University of Michigan told members He received his A. B. degree at De- bureau's operation. Schenectady, N. Y., Dec. 5.-Dee-
of the Michigan State association of Pauw University, and his M. D. at The new plan he said contemplates laring that the Michigan football team I
f.-.n ,., nln, intatir final scion D etroit . ater he ,tudied law .n d giving every claimant a full hearing mnn its names this vare heause of

director of students welfare, "the
tional Tuberculosis association
contributed immeasureably to the 1
gress of our war against the g
white plague.
"It is estimated that there are to
one million active cases of tubercul
in the United States, and another
lion latent potential cases,' he ad
The National Tuberculosis associa
through its state organization,
Michigan State Tuberculosis as
tion is combating the plague in
state.
The special S C. A. committe
charge of the sale of Christmas s
among ihetfraternities onithe can
includes Robert Straub, '25, chairs
David Bromberg, '25, and Clar
Beckwith, '25. The Y. W. C. A. is
ing charge of the sale of the sta
in sororities through Louise G
way, '24.
OPERA TIUKETL
ARE SOLD 01
Tickets for the Union opera, "C<
Stockings,"- are entirely sold foi
of the local performances of the s
the last of the seats were sold ye
ady including those for the extra
formance Saturday night and for
Saturday afternoon matinee.
The only remaining opportunit
students and others to see the c

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