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September 30, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-09-30

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THE WEATHER
PARTLY CLOUDY; NO
TEMPERATURE CHANGE

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ASSOCIATED PRESS
EAMSED WIRE SERVICE
IYESTEIIN CONFERENCE
Fs DI'QRI AL A SSiCINAT1ON

i,

VOL. XXXIV. No. 7

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1923

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CEN'

T __________________________

DISTRICT COURT
BLOCKSOKLAHOMA
STATE__ELECTION
TEMPORARY INJUNCTION PRE-
VENTS BALLOTING ON SPE-
CIAL LEGISLATIVE SESSION
WALTON ASSERTS VOTE
WOULD BE "ILLEGAL"

Big TicketcSale Forecasts
Record Football Attendance

Kansan File SuIt Against Klan
Alleged Mistreatment in
Tulsa County

for

Oklahoma City, Okla., Sept. 29
-(By A.P.)-Prospect of a vote
Tuesday on initiative measures
authorizing the state legislature
to convene itself to consider offi-
cial acts of state officers were
dimmed today when Judge 0. L.
Price, in state district court grant-
ed a temporary restraining order
preventing the st'ate election or-
der from placing the question on
the ballot.
Oklahoma City, Okla., Sept. 29-(By
A.P.)-The special state election call.
ed for Oct. 2, at which it is possible
an initiative bill permitting the state
legislature to convene and investigate
state officials may be voted upon will
be illegal in his opinion, Gov. J. C.
Walton declared here tonight.
The Governor would not say wheth-
er he intended to prevent the elec-
tion and declined to discuss his po-
sition in the court fight of h's coun-
cl to keep the initiative proposal off
the ballot.
"I have the power to revoke the
special election," was the governor's
only assertion. The state supreme
court ruled Thursday that the elec-
tion would) be legal.
Governor Walton said he could cite
many reasons to substantiate his
claim, chief of which is the failure
of the state election board to follow
the law' compelling publication of
election issues five days prior to the
date for the election.
'Muskogee, Okla., Sept. 29-(By A.
P.)-S. A. Lesky, of Ellsworth, Kans.
filed suit in the U S. district court
here today against the Ku Klux Klan
asking $150,000 damages for injury
he said he received when he was tar-
red and feathered in Tulsa county in
July 1922.
Prominent individuals including
Richard Lloyd Jones, widely known
newspaper publisher, and Charles B.
Peters, Tulsa oil operator, were made
joint defendants in the action.
CHICAO OVERWHELMS
AGGIES BY 34-0 SCORE
Chicago, Sept. 29.-(By A.P.)-The
University of Chicago opened its 1923
football season today with a victory
over Michigan Aggies, 34 to 0. Within
striking distance of the goal, the Chi-
cago machine showed speed and drive,
scoring two touchdowns from 20 yard
forward passes, one from a series of
line plunges, one on an Aggie fumble
and one on a pretty broken field run
by Captain Jimmy Pyott. The Ma-
roons completed five out of six pass-
es. The only pass', completed by the
Aggies was recalled for an off side
penalty.
Los Angeles, Sept. 29-Lyman Ste-
wart, dean of southern California oil
operators, founder of the Union Oil
Co., and chairman of its board of di-
rectors, died of acute bronchitis and
complications Friday.
New York, Sept. 29.-The giant navy
dirigible ZR-i wil leave Lakehurst, N.
J., Sunday morning on a non-stop
flight to St. Louis, Mo.
"THE SU)N-MAG."
which is an irreverent abbreviation
for
THE SUNDAY MAGAZINE
has, in this issue
"THE ADVENT OF IGNORANCE"
An article dealing with the
modern method of education via
passive absorption.
"JOHN DONNE"-

An appreciative article.
SCOGAN

Greater demand for tickets for all
of the home games on the Michigan
schedule has been evidenced this
year than any season in the history
of the Athletic association. Already
the ticket sale for students and fac-
ulty for the Marine game alone
amounts to more than 200 more than
the demand for both of the Conference
games at a similar date last year.
Minnesota 'Tickets Golng XFast
If sale of tickets for the Minnesota
game continues at the present rate,
the Athletic association is confident
that the stands will be sold out sever-
al weeks before the game. For this
reason they desire that students who
wish to secure extra tickets send in
their applications immediately. It is
anticipated if the weather for the
Vanderbilt and Marine games is fav-
orable that a capacity crowd will be
on hand for both occasions.
Figures issued last night by Harry
Tillotson, assistant director of the
Athletic association, giving the num-
ber of tickets sold to date this year
SRAZEN DEFEATS
HAGN IN FINAS
First Extra Hole Match In History
Of Natin's Pro' Tournament
Ends At 88th..
EXCELLENT APPROACH FROM
DIFFICULT LIE WINS TITLE1
Pelham Manor, N. Y., Sept. 29.-(By
A. P.)-An amazigig recovery shot
from a cray-fish mark beside the 38th
hole at the Pelham country club
brought victory today for Gene Sara-
zen, the young Italian-American in-
structor of Briar Cliff Manor and de-
feat for Walter Hagen, the veteran,t
in the professional golfers' associa-
tion's most thrilling title match. Andt
upon Saraen's head still rests thet
crown he won last year at Oakmont,
Pennsylvania.
Victory for Sarazen in this, theE
first extra hole final match in thet
history of the professional champion-
ship tournament came after an uphill<
fight by Hagen who had squared the;
match at the 36th hole after beingt
three down at the 28th. They sorted
an extra hole after Hagen had made1
an excellent recovery from a trap on
the 36th for a half.
Both sank putts of more than 5t
feet on the 37th for birdie fours.
Came then the tricky 38th, a 310 yard
hole with a sharp curve to the green1
around a clump of trees. Hagen es-
sayed a shot over the trees to thet
green. His ball stopped on the edge<
of a sand trap beside the gireen.,
Undismayed by his shot, Sarazen,
played for the hole. His ball fell short
in mossy ground sprinkled with the
mud of cray-fish. Selecting a mashieI
niblick he put the ball within two
feet of the cup. This excellent shott
drew the applause of the great gal-
lery. When there was quiet Hagen
stepped to his ball. Perhaps Sarazen's
shot unnerved him for when he struck
he looked up and his ball failed to
carry out of the sand. His third shot
curved toward the cup and seemed as
if it might go in, then rolled to one
side. Sarazen ks did not hesitate with
his putt. It trickled in.
TWO INJURED IN TOLEDO
PRTMENT EXPLOSION
4 iLU|U
Toledo, Sent. 29.-- The third of a
series of unexplained explosions in
five days, thought to have been aus-
ed by the discharging of a bomb, oc-
curred at the Charles Apartments, in
Franklin avenue, last night.
The bomb was discharged on the

roof of the apartment, a three-story
brick structure, over the rooms oc-
cupied by J. A. Beckert, mechanical
dentist.
Mrs. Charles Olson, mother-in-law
of Mr. Beckert who was in the bath-
room, was badly burned about the head
and neck, and is suffering from shock,
according to physicians.
Ferris to Abandon Speaking
Kalamazoo, Sept. 29-(By A.P.)-_j
Senator Woodbridge N. Ferris will
not make any more speaking engage-I
ments for the present. The big Rap-
ids educatorthere Friday to addressi
the Kalamazoo Teacher's club, an-
nounced that on the advice of a Grand
Rapids specialist he will limit h:s
speechmaking to a minimum.

and at the same time in previous
years give an idea of the situation.
Already students and faculty have ap-
plied for more than 9,000 more tickets
for the Ohio State game than at the
same time for the game two years
ago when the Ferry Field stadium was
dedicated. The alumni already have
been allotted the maximum 13,000
seats this year while in 1921 they had
only applied for 6970 on Sept. 29.
Demand Greater Thin Ever.
At this time last season, the total
alumni demand for tickets for the
two home games, Illinois and Wiscon-
sin, amounted to only 13,625. To date
the total for the two home Conference
games is 25,400, land for the four re-
served seat games 35,676. A similar
increase is shown in student and fac-
ulty demand which last year amount-
ed to 4,267 by Sept. 29 and at the
present time totals 15,696. When the
applications for the Vanderbilt and
Marine games are added, the total for
students and faculty reaches 24,597.
Alumni have applied for 2,964 tc-
kets for the Vanderbilt game, 7,312
for the Marine game and 12,314 for the
Minnesota game, while the figures for
student and faculty are as follows:
Vanderbilt, 4,398, U. S. Marines, 4,503,
and Minnesota, 4,363. Since the 13,000
maximum fixed for the Ohio State
game has been reached, $17,157.50
have been returned to alumni foi
whom there are no accommodations.
UNNIESITY GLEE CLUB
CALLS FOR TRYUTS'
LACK OF OLD MATERIAL HINDER',
PREPARATION FOR MIDDLE
WEST CONTEST
First call for the University Glee
club has been issued by the board in
control of the University Glee clubs
and all men who intend togo out for
the club are asked to report from
3:30 to 5:30 o'clock and from 7:30
to 9 o'clock Monday in the upper
reading room of the Union. The
Glee club is starting under difficulties
this year, for at present there are no
standing members in the club.
All those who have had any vocal
experience are asked to tryout. George
Oscar Bowen, director of the Glee
club, will give all the tryouts a
chance to sing in quartettes this week
so that the membership of the club
may be determined. The club is also
in need of an accompanist and ex
perienced pianists along this line are
asked to report.
John M. Russel, '24, manager of the
Glee club, is leaving Monday night
for Chicago where the Intercollegi-
ate competitions to determine the
best school glee club in the middle
west will be held. He will endeavor
to obtain permission for Michigan to
enter the competitions. Wisconsin
won the affair last year and as a re-
sult -went to New York city where the
eastern competitions were held.
Elmer C. Upton, '20, will be the
Michigan representative on the board
of the Intercollegiate Glee clubs at
Chicago.
Success Assured
To New TheatreI
In Opening Play
Hubert Henry Davies' vivacious
comedy, "The Mollusc" was presented
with great effect last night at the
Whitney by the Michigan Repertory
theater. It was the first performance
of this company in Ann Arbor.
The play itself is very 'amusing.
It deals with the type of lady who sits
in a chair-"the only comfortable
chair in the room"-and complains
of excessive weariness. When she
gets up in the morning she blames
this lassitude on the excitement of
the night before; after a long day's
rest she sighs for a good night's

sleep to recover from her fatiguing
activity.
The comic situations that naturally!
developed from the combination of,
this mollusc of a woman with a little;
worm of a husband, a blustering bro--
ther, and a pretty governess were well
handled by the capable and happily
chosen cast. William Franklin as the
husband was especially effective. ie
is the sort of actor who makes one
laugh by simply standing with his
hands in his pockets.
If the Michigan Repertory Theater
satisfies all its audiences as complete-
ly as it did those who attended itsj
opening in Ann Arbor last night, thei
project will eventually be a success.f
"The Mollusc" was a good play, but
it was also a play that anyone could
enjoy. Those who came to admire
art were not disappointed; and the
others, hoping against hope that they.

Chicago 34, M.A.C. 0.
Iowa 20, Oklahoma Aggies 0.
Brown 34, Haverford 0.
Willams 34, Hamilton 0.
Pennsylvania 20, F. and M. 0.
Bowdoin 13, Amherst 0.
Army 41, Tennessee 0.
Dartmouth 13, Norwich 0.
Hiram 7, Oberlin 6.
Navy 39, William and Mary 10.
Pitt. 21, Bucknell 0.
Colgate 42, Boston Tech. 0.
Penn State 58, Lebanon Valley 0.
W. and J. 21, Bethany 0.
Notre Dame 74, Kalamazoo 0.
Cornell 41, St. Bonaventure 6.
Georgia Tech. 28, Oglethorpe 13.
Knox 13, Northwestern'0.
W. and L. 19, Western Marylandl 3.
Western State Normal 15, Notre
Dame (Fresh) 0.
SEARCH FOB WREC
ICTI S RETAHRE
'and Creek Washout Causes Delay
of Wrecking Train 14 Miles
From Diaster
REPOIRT ONLY TIRiFll YODIES
DISCOVERED AT AC(CI DEN I
Casper, Wyo., Sept. 29--(By A.P.)
-Dissapointing delays loomed as a
prospect this afternoon in efforts to
recover the bod'es of victims buried
in water and sand in Coal creek
where Burlington train number M0
crashed through a bridge Thursday
night.
The water was reported to be ris-
ing again, apparently from late rains
Only three bodies had been removed
to Casper this afternoon but it war
reported that a fourth lody had bcen
found.
Drelay in the arrival of a wrecking
train from Alliance, Neb., which i
reported stalled at Sand Creek, 18
miles East of the wrck, retarded the
rescue work. The Sand creek is re-
ported to have been washed out.
FORD ASKS HRA
COAL CAR ECEE
Washington, Sept. 29-(By A.P.)-
Henry Ford filed a petition with the
Interstate Commerce Commission to-
day, asking reconsideration of its
July decison in the assigned car case
which, he contended, would have "a.
widespread effect on the price" of
Ford cars.-
The general result of the decision
which Mr. Ford complains was to re-
fuse coal mines, and utilities owning
their own coal cars, the right to con-
trol those cars in the shipment of
fuel.
The Ford petition sa'd that two fac-
tories owned by the Ford Motor Co.
used more than 3,000 tons of coal a
day; and, that, in addition to acquir-
ing coal mines at various places, the
Ford interests also had purchased $1,-
807,000 worth of steel coal cars. If
the commission's decision stands, the
petition concluded, there will be a
serious loss to the company-
A number of utlity companies, rail-
roads and others also have petitioned
for a rehearing.
BURTON COMMENDS
REPERTORY PLAN
President Marion L. Burton, in
speaking of the Michigan Repertory
Theatre movement yesteday, made the

following statement: "The Michigan
Repertory Theatre is meeting one of
the most obvious and at the same
time serious needs of this University
and community. We must not criti-
cize our tastes and standardis in any
realm without attempting to provide
the means by which they may be im-I
proved. In the dramatic field in par-
ticular the lovers of real art are
forced to lead impoverished lives.
Many very practical difficulties con-
tribute to this result. Now we have
a chance to prove what our real he-
niands are. The Michigan Repertory
Theatre is organized and directed by
those whose training, experience and
standards of judgment can be relied
upon to present to us plays of the
highest merit. To fail in our support,
generous and continuous, of this en-
terprise will be conclusive indica-
tion of our actual needs. We pro-
nhtv th at t1- Imi-. ovement will s t)(ed-

CLOUDBURST AND
TORNADO RAVAGE
WESTERN CITIES
IWAN AN I) NEBRASKA N TOWNS
STRICKEN AS FIRE
FOLILOWS STORM
DAMAGE ESTIMATED AT
ONE MILLION DOLLARS
Itver Over-runs Banks, Uidermining
Residences and Theatre At
Council Bluffs
Omaha, Neb., Sept. 29.-(By A. P.)-
Nineteen killed, three missing, nearly
a score seriously injured, and almost
a million dollars property damage
were the results of a combined torna-
do and cloudburst in western Iowa
and Nebraska Friday night.
In Council Bluffs, Ia., fire followed
the tornado and destroyed warehouses
and private homes. The rear of the
Strand theatre was hurled into Indian
creek. Twelve houses in a row were
ota lly demolished. From three to six
feet of water ran through the busi-
ness section and the damage was set
at approximately $250,000, while five
persons were known to be dead.
Peculiar Disaster at Louisville
Louisville, Neb., was the scene of
a peculiar disaster when eight mourn-
ers were killed when the house shel-
tering the body of Mrs. Mary McCra-
ver was swept into Mill Creek. Dr.
A. A. Ward, a physician of Marquette,
Neb., was killed when, blinded by
rain and hail, he lost control of his
car which turned over in the ditch.
Several persons reported missing at
various points are believed to have
been carried away by the streams
which are swollen out of their banks
(ue to the heavy rainfall.
Another deluge of rain and hail
struck the city tonight and lasted
about an hour. Cots and blankets for
the homeless were obtained from the
Red Cross and a school house is being
usedl as a relief center. Approximate-
ly three square blocks were razed by
the tornado.

Louis J. Horowiz
Louis J. Mor~owitz, president of a na-,
tionally known construction company,
has left for Italy to ask permission o.f
Premier Mussolini to rebuild ruinedl
Messina. This city was wiped out by
a volcanic' eruption.
UNION COMMITTEE
APPOIN81TEES NAMED
Charles :1). Liv ugston, '2?i Appoinfted
Chairwman of General Reception
Coimmuittee
OPI'ORTUN ITY STILL OPEN FOR
STUIDENTS TO WORK AT UNION
Appointment of the chairmen of
the principal standing committee of
the Union was made yesterday by
Thomas J. Lynch, '25L, pr'tiadent.
The work of the Union this year will
be carried on by six departments, four
of which are appointive, two elect-
iye.

U. S. Millionaire
Offers To Build
Devastate City

comies Swept Away Chairmen Picked.
The home and other buildings of Charles Livingston '2. was au-
Mrs. C. B. Gilford at Louisville were
swept away leaving the site bare. Mrs. pointed chairman of the general re-
Gilford escaped injury. Seventy ception committee which includes the
blocks were inundated in all. following standing committees: fall
reception, alumni reception, 'athletic
LOYD0WILL REPRESENT reception, and other reception comn.
nittees. Robert Hummer, '25, was
given the headship of the house com-
mittee, which includes the following
sub-committees: dance, bilhard, bowl-
ing, and library. Charles Merriam,
W. W. CAMPBELL, 16, WILL BE- '25E, had his appointment confirmed1
C()ME ('OLLE(4E PRIEIMDENT as chairman of the upperciass advis- 1
OCTOBER 11 ory committee. Merriam is helped in
I__Ihis work by a number of assistant,
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd of the grad- chairmen, and by more than 300 up-
uate school has been appointed to perclassmen who act advisors to the
represent the University at the in- freshmen. Edward Stark, '24, will
auguration of William W. Campbell. head the life membership drive which
'46. as pres'dent of the University of probably is to be held shortly before
California on Oct. 11 at Berkeley, ac-IChristmas.
cording to an announcement made John D. Briscoe, 14E, is president;
yesterday by President Marion L. of Mimes dramatic society, and as
Burton. Dr. Campbell is a distingu- such will largely direct the dramaticG
ished astronomer, having been direc- activities of the Union. The depart-
tor of the great Lick observatory for ment of the recording secretary of
many years and a prominent figure in this year will be in charge of Henry
American education. Hubbard, 24E, who will be helped by
Dr, Campbell's appointment adds Karl Robertson, 25E, and Milton
another to the imposing list of Amer- PetersCsa
ican oilee prsidets wh aregradthe*rs to be Chosen Laler-.
ioan college presidents who are grad- Other committees for the year will
uates of the University. President be announced later and will be merg-
Angell of Yale, President Brooks of ed into the principal committees.
the University of Missouri, President Students who care to work for the,
Hicks of the University of Cincinnati' Union will meet with Lynch from 2
and President Raymond of Armour to 5 o'clock Monday afternoon in thc
Institute are all well-known Michi- student activities room on the third
gan alumni.foor of the Union.
Prof. Harold M. Bowman of the law
department of Boston university will D
represent the University of Michigan P 911PRC OS
at the, celebration in recognition of IUU IIL UU
the fiftieth anniversary of that insti-t
tut'on.
Dean Paul C. Packer of the college ONCE MOREIN BER T
of education of the University of Iowa. I -
will represent the University of Mich- Detroit, Sept. 29.-Standard Oil.
igan at the inauguration of Dr. Har- Sinclair Refining and Wayco Oil com-
lan Updegraff of Cornell college at i sl
Mount Vernon, Iowa, Oct. 19. panies yesterday followed the lead of
the White Star Refining Co. and re-
I CONCERT TICKETS duced the price of gasoline two cents
SELLING RAPIDLY to 14.8 cents a gallon. The present
reduction, an official of the White
Star Co. explained, is not warrantedl
Orders for concert tickets, both for by the cost of production, but is the
the Choral Union and the Extra Con- result of demoralization in the indus-M
cert series, are being received daily try due to oversupply.
at the office of the School of Music.'
They are being filed in order of re-
ceipt, and the tickets will be mailed SEAT PREFERENCE
out about Oct. 10. Seats on the main E N D S TONIGHT

OPENS WITH MANY
NAVY BEA TS W IIAM AND MARY;
ARMY ''f THillPHS O TER
TEN N E SS E
OKLAHOMA AGGIES LOSE
TO IOWA BY 20-0 SCORE
Ea and West Swings Into Action;
No Estimates of Tean Rting
Can Be Prawn
Football in the east and central
west swung into its stride yesterday
when leading schools of the two sec-
tions opened their season. Although
none of the contests were of import-
ance in the deerm nation of places
in the standings in the sections, due
to the fact that the opening conests
of the large schools were played with
smaller oponents, the outcomes of
the games enables estimates of the
strength of the teams to be formed.
In the leading games of the east,
the Army disposed of the University
of Tennessee while the Navy ran up a
score of 3I to 10 over William and
Mary college. Harvard, Princeton,
and Yale, the "Big Three" of the east
remained inactive.
Iowa Wins
In the central west, Iowa defeated
the Oklahoma Aggies while Notre
Dame disposed of .Kalamazoo. Other
large Big Ten teams, with the excep-
tion of Chicago who took the Michi-
gan Aggies into camp, remained inac-
tive.
Iowa's reorganized eleven triumph-
ed over the Oklahoma Agg es 20 to
0 at Iowa City. Oklahoma was un-
able to cope with the lawkeyes' end
runs in which some of the new mhen
gave an umexpected goodhaccount of
themselves. The line up included but
five veterans.
A score of scouts from Princeton
and West Point watched Notre Dame
(leat Kalamazoo at South Bend, 74
to 0. Matier,r ight half, carried the
openi.g k.i 00 yards fur u touch-
dowr, the feat making the third suc-
cessive season a Notre Dame player
has carried the first kick of a game
over for a touchdown.
(Cornell ame Slow
Cornell opened its football season
at Ithaca by defeating St. I3onaven-
ture in a slow game, 41 to G. The
game was prolonged by numerous '(
penalties on both teams.
Columbia played its first gamfie to-
day under the regime of Percy Haugh-
ton, former iarvard coach, but' the
Blue and White, wahile displaying a
well drilled eleven had difliculty de-
feating Ursinsus 13 to 0. Whipped
into shape under haughton, Harvard's
system, from green timber, Colum-
bia's play was not impressive but the
team was handicapped by the loss of
several stars.
The Army deeated the University
of 'Tennessee 41 to 0 in a contest, play-
ed under a blazin; s:mn'and in mid-
summer termporatue. The Army
clearly outchlsscd 1 'the southerners
who got wri.hin the Cadet 30 yard
line but once. Six tochdowns made
up the Army's total for the day.
Miid shim men Wil Easiy
Unable to cope with a bwildering
series of forward passes unleased by
the Annapolis midshipmen in the
early stages of play William and Mary
college went down to defeat by a
score of 30 to 10. The middies also
circled the ends for substantial gains,
at tiner but had little success with
plays (ireCted between tackles.
Winning by the score of 15 to 0 the
University of Detroit failed to im-

press with its initial victory of the
seMson over the little Alma college
1 eleven.
Outweighed at least 20 pounds to
time man the snall upstate eleven
fought their heavier opponents to a
scorels ( tio for the first three quar-
ters. They yielded in the fourth
quart;r for two touchdowns and a
field goal after they had played them-
selves into a state of l:iyieatl exhau-
stion.
The honor of having the largest
score of the season so far recorded
goes to Dayton University who play-
eid the eleven from Central Normal of
Indiana off its feet piling up a total
of 161 to 0.
FOUR P f NSKLLED

i

floor prove' to

be in greatest demand,

I
.
.

fleec y MaiL 1 116tO pill.) I L ll -
ily win for itself a permanent place
in Michigan."j

though many good seats are still Student applications for tickets for
available. the Ohio State and Vanderbilt games WHEN TRII HitStU d
London, Sept. 29.-The Trade Un- will be accepted until 6 o'clock this
ion Council and the Labor Party ex- evening at the office of the Athletic Erie, Pa., Sept. 29-(By A.P.)-
ecutives have adopted a resolution association in the Press building, ac- 1persons were killed and anoth

BUTU
-Four
er pro-

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