100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 29, 1923 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATIURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,

s

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN I
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Poard in
Contiol of Student Publications.j
Menbers of Western Conference Editorial1
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subssription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
hard Street.
I'honcs: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-1
ness, 960.
Signed communications, not exceeding 300
N iwos. wil be pubdished in The Daily at
the discretion of the Editor. Upon request,
the identity of communicants will be re-
garded as confidential.
EDITORIAL S.TAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-31
MANAGING EDITOR
HOWARD A. DONAHUE
News Editor................Julian E. Mack
City Editor................ ..harry [locy
Editorial Board Chairman.... R. C. Moriarty
Night Editors
E. II. Ailes A. B. Connable
Harry C. Clark J. ;. Garlinghouse
P. M., Wagner:
Sports Editor..............Ralph N. ByersY
Women's Editor...........Winona Hibbard
Telegraph Editor................R. B. Tarr
Sunday M gazine Editor.....F. 1. Tilden
.Music Edlitur~.......... ..Ruth A. Howell
Editorial Board
Paul Einstein Ronrt Ramn:ayt
Andrew Proppert
Assistantsf
13. G. Bactcke j. J. McGinnisf
Helen Brown R. S. Mansfield
Bernadette Cote E. C. Mack
Darold Ehrlich S. J. Schnitz
E. C. Fingerle W. L. Scratch
T. P1. henry S. L. Smith
Dorothy Ka-min WV. H. Stoneman 1
K. C. Kellair.11. 1L. Stonlel
Inep i Kruger N. R. Thai
Elizabeth Lieberman S. B. Tremble1
R. R. McGeorge, Tr. W. J. Walthoar
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone, 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAURENCE H. FAVROT
Advertising.................. E. L. Dunne
Advertising ...............Perry M. Hayden
Advertising ......................C. Purdy
Advertising .....................W. Roesserf
Advertising .................W. K. Scherer
Accounts ....................C. W. Christie
Circulation..............Jno. Hlaskins
Publication................Lawrence Pierce
Assistantst
Bennie Caplan Edw. D. Hoedemaker
John Conlin Harold A. Marks t
Allin B. Crouch Byron Parker
ois M. Dexter S. A. Robinson
Rowan Fasquedle II. M. Rockwell t
Joseph J. Finn II. E. Rose
)avid A. Fox Will Weisej
Lauren Ilaight C. F. White

dawn walking tho streets. It is up to
the men and women of Michigan to
make this number as few as possible.
Michigan must be her true self that
night and come forward with a help-
ing hand wherever possible.
The welcome Michigan received
from Ohio State last year was un-
marred by any overzealous desire to
win. Ohio State fought hard until the
end and when she lost she took her!
defeat without any display of hardi
feeling. We can well imitate her in
our attitude this year. Let us be real
hosts. Let us make things not only
interesting but pleasant for our vis-I
itors and after the game, whether we
win or lose, let us bid them good-j
bye on the same friendly plane.
FRIENDSHII P
There is nothing which affords thej
:ndividual greater satisfaction thanj
the assurance of a strong frienship.
Few men can enjoy life without com-
pany, and even tney are a peculiar
lot.

I

'TOASTED ROLLVI

- OPQRI UTWXYZ
By joining, separating, and arrang-
ing the above letters, and using same
as often as desired, our dear read-t
ers can compose any sage dig that
they think would be appropriate for
the head of the col. We, for our,
part, are heartily sick of inventing
them. . . .
Tlhe Contest
Sir:
May I suggest that:
"We're here because we're here,
Because we're here, because we're
here."
On Bended Knee,
Don't I win the half million marks?
Editorial

At the University of Michigan, one We think it most unfortunate that
can find nothing finer than a real "The Birth of a Nation" should be1
comradeship with men. Education subjected to a revival at this time.
consists largely of character build- This fillum portrays, as you must all
ing and it is in the assocations with remember, the big doing of the Kuc
men and women of high ideals and Kluxers after the civil war; duringl
aspirations, varied talents and extens- which period they may have perform-i
ive capabilities, that character can be ed very useful functions, such as res-
most firmly, and permanently moulded. cuing natty damosels and other peo-
In a community abounding with ple from burning log cabins. Now,
great intellects, there could be no however, when the wearers of the#
higher aim in the student mind than mystic hood are increasing numeri-J
the achievement of intimate acquain- cally every day, and not a week goes1
tanceship with some members of the by without witnessing the creation of1
faculty. All the members of the pro- some new Grand Goblin or King
fessorial staff ardently desire a spir- Kleagle, or Imperial Buzzard; and the
it of good fellowship between them- Governor of Oklahoma is obliged toI
selves and the student body. In an use martial law as a direct conse-I
institution of this size it is almost im- quence of their activities in his state
possible to arrange a definite plan of -now, we think, is a poor time to
having each student personally con- shoe these asses gallopin' around in
nected with some specified member their night-gowns on snow-white
of the faculty, but nevertheless, there horses, the heroes of the piece.
are more than enough big minds on And maybe that last sentence did'nt
the campus to furnish each young leave us breathless.
man and woman with a friend and * * *
incentive to productive work. EIgise
Many men, looking back a quarter .p
or half century to the days when they Journalistically speaking, President
remember their Burton is a, news source. And it has
were at Michigan, Jeebrter.
been his custom, of late, to meet re-
friends and everything associated porterstool teGCe D,
with them; that is almost all. In- porters, not only from the G C D,
deed, they have retaned a hazy no-but also from the W, G N, the Asso-
tion of the traditional ceremnonials ciated Press, and in addition a dele-
which still occupy so vital a part in gation from Ann Arbor's only After
the school year, but their friends, noon paper-at half after eleven in
what happened to them, and what the morning. On these occasions the
President has been dishing out such
they did together, are the most viv- Prsdn1a en ihn u uh
i little morsels of news as he is privy
id memories of all. Friends and
friendships are the most precious to.
things in the world. Hardest of all A few days ago, this little band
things to establish they are all too of searchers after truth was sitting
in the ante-room of the Burtonian of-
easily broken. .I
Make your friends early in the fice, waiting to be ushered into the
game and retain them throughout Presence. Enter, at this point in the
gameand etan thm trougoutdrama, a great, prominent professor,
life, for he who has them and holdsdr
them is endowed with an imperish- tall and handsome. Says he: May
.I see President Burton? Says Prex-
able memory of the joys of his col-jIjseresidenthBuroneSaysuarex
lege pals. Even the professor can be y's secretary: The president usualy
that. sees the reporters at 11:30. Says the
handsome one: Well, I have business
with the President more important
Those shiploads of immigrants rae- than any reporters: could have. Please
ing here to beat the quota seem to be tell the pres'dent that. The Secretary
willing to take a chance on our form did so, and tie new arrival passed in-
of government, which is encouraging to the sanctum
in light of the despair with which it Impressed with the kindly, winning
is regarded by some of our home- II
manner of this great intellectual muon-
arch, the- reporters rose as a man,
and heaving a deep sigh of respect,
It will probobly prove exceedingly walked away-leaving the professor
wisp to have the Leviathan and Ma- . c w hief.
LM-in loving conference with his chie...

EDITORIAL COMMENT11
A TRANSFER OF GENUS
(The JBoston Transcript)
Accompanying the increase in the
number of students in the academic
departments of our colleges there is
a decrease in the technical depart-
ments of most of them and in the
technical schools generally. This de-
crease is attributed to the fact that
the engineering profession, at least
in its introductory stages, had be-
come overcrowded as the result of the
rush into the profession during and
following the war. This explanation
is no doubt adequate as to any falling
off that may appear in the technical
schools, but it takes no account of the
fact that the overcrowding of the old
"learned profession"--medicine, law.
literature, divinity, which is also
somewhat marked-has had no effect
m diminishing the numbers of stu-
dents in the academic departments of
the colleges. The old saw, which was
always quoted by the committee man
when he visited the district school ev-
en a hundred years ago, and is ha-
bitually quoted still, about there be--
ing always room at the top, is appar-
ently still the guide of the rising gen-
eration.
That techncal students, and par-
ticularly engineering students, are
fewer, does not mean that there are
fewer students. On the contrary,.
there are more. There may be too)
many lawyers, but there is always
room for the good lawyer that the
youthful aspirant to the bar is going
to become. Literature is a path upon
which many and multiplying thou-
sands walk, but the Kiplings and the
Edith Whartons do not find themselves
crowded. Why should it not be the
same way with the Elihu Thompsons
and the Steinmetzes? At all events
the college entrants attain their rec-
ord numbers in this year of grace.
It is simply a transfer of destinations,
a shifting of genius. The higher edu-
cation retains its hold on the public
mind and the private purpose.
And this is well, and always will be
well. There will never be too much
higher education, nor too many edu-
cated men and women. Engineers and
lawyers and authors will come ani
go, but education not only shapes and
effectuates the superior mind but
through suggestion and influence
forms the common mind. The engin-
eering profession's numerical loss may
be lost to the future by the transfer
of students to other departments re-
corded this year, but general learning
and common efficiency will be the
gain'' Js. " _'
Mr.Ford is willing to run for Prs;
ident, according to a dispatch from
Detroit, and evidently he is willing
to run now while the running is good.
YESTERDAY
By SMYTHE

I ~ Ym ___________________-____________________________________________________________.''sr, {:c

i x BOoS OF TH 3 DIApes or al
BOTH ENDS MFT DIAGONAL WALK

RM

l3wowl=s

m 0 '%

---
wrr.rrir.,,

Central 'riir.c >bio'Time)
Leave Chamber of Commerce
Week Days Sundays
6:45 a. m. 6:45 a. m.
.2:45 p.m. 6:45 p.m.
4:45 p. m.
JAS. H. ELLIOTT, Proprietor
Phon.e 92t-M Adrian, Mich.

Ir
--

(i

IAILsL-"7'S BARBER SHOP
THREE FIRST-CLASS BARBERS
i UTE5Y AND SERVICE
i r:CS A (A ,L lil[S. I lVERSITY AVENUE

(C

P1opular Mat.
,arrick e:; t
CigItts 5Oc fto $2..'0; Sat. -Ma;'5to. $
WYAG~ENII ALS & N EM P1EltPr'selit
by Naary] Ro Ierts ji ebart lii&I
Avery Iloivood

F
iii
r
:? 1

THE BUSY BE,
PASSES
WATCH FOR OPENING
T hE A RBIOR FOUNT AIN

TODAY'S FEATURE
Will bc an CceptionaI offering of Ladies, Misses and
Children's Hats
'Hats for the Matron
R LAP RPRICE HAT SHOP
333 SOUTH MAIN STREFT

r

1 P,

~~~~-

JUNIORS !
There will be no hn grave o rev-
erendi about you next year i yol mike
a mis'ake and flunk two or illl'te
cournscs. Make sure of a lot of 's
by handimg in Coronatyped notes, re--
ports and themes. $50 buys a newj
on6 $<30 a perfectly good one. Other
makes of typewrters taken in oat.
payment.
0. D. MOR RIL L,
17 iNI(hELS Xl?( AIE
The Tylocplrill r and Stalinery ' A
Dealer:
L. (. Smith and ('era ys'4 ri'

SORTER DAYS
AND
DARR NIGHTS
m1,itoks you want to
LOO WEL L TO YOUR LIGHTS
We have

i

-. . "rIced i'i i rf
Chieken Pies $3.00 to $16.50 Installed
iiA Appealing Variety
Tonight
Karolyn Kitchen
219 W. HURON
1fr E Liberto
,- ,h or the MoCt rC1r"
_ e ,d ^l . 1 P Hj C R l : f r I G A . : . f l . .& : S A

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1923
Night Editor-R. A. BILLINGTON
THE SOPHOMORE NUISANCE
At this season of the year, a good-
ly crop of sophomore hazers, like
mushrooms, may be expected to spring
up overnight. It is a time of" fever-I
ish enforcement of traditions with the
sophomore the self-appointed police-
man. As long as he confines his ef-
forts to tradition, the sophomore isl
tolerable, but when he attempts to
-make the freshman a public butt for
this own amusement, he becomes as
iiuch of a campus nuisance as the
freshman who spills soup in the up-
perclassman's lap.
The mild haz'ng that has taken
place during the past week was done,
by sophomores who are not among the
best men in the class. The last as-
sertion stands unmodified. The soph-
omore hazers are noticeably a, lower
type socially than those who do not
insist on naking asses of themselves'
in the eyes of the upperclassmen.
The action of the Student council
in preparing the discipline machin-
ery to take care of this mushroom
g-owth is a welcowe one, for, while
the training of freshmen is an import-
ant duty of the older men, such work
can be done satisfacdtorily without
the assistance of the "sophomore nuis-
ance."
W} EL DIRECTED ENTHIIASI
Followers of the Wolverine team
who attended the game with Ohio

I
1.
I
I

jestic sail in opposite directions.
Then both can retain the speed chain-
pionship.
Twenty-Five Years
Ago At Michigan
Vroill the files of- tile U. of M.
Daily, September 21., 1898.
Prof. M. E. Cooley is still in the ser-
vice of the navy department. A letterl
received from him recently was dat-
ed League Island, Philadelphia, and
stated that the Yosemite hal just re-
turned from a. trip to Mole St. Nicho-
las, Island of Hiatt. The steamer had
been in reserve ,and all the crew
save two officers and himself were dis-
charged.
Mr. Earle W. Dow has returned to
the University to resume his workj
as instructor of history after two
years spent in Europe.
Dr. Lawrence Bigelow is a new in-
structor in the general chemistryj
work of the University. He graduat-
ed from Harvard University in 1S91,
and from the Massachussetts Insti-
tute of Technology in 1895, and re-
ceived his degree of Ph. D. at Leip-
zig in 1898. Dr. Bigelow has organiz-
ed a course in physical chemistry
which will be given for the first time
this semester.
The Unversity band which gave
such good service at the athletic
games and several dances last year,
will be reorganized soon. The num-

. THE HENDECAMERON
In dying, Andrew brought grief to
many. But there was one consola-
t'on. His spirit lived-not in the or-
dinary, prosaic manner in which spir-
its aro said to live; but in a very real,
a matter-of-fact way. For his spirit
lived in his young son Jabez, a lad
of spirit whom everyone was fond
of likening to Andrew. However, one
day Jabe, as he was affectionatelyl
called by those who knew him well,
went for a walk. He had not gone
far before he fell into a man-hole.
Climbing out of this he continued
down the street, falling into another.
Getting out of this one, he walked
a few feet to the next one, which he
likewise fell into. "Whew!" said
Jabe, climbing out of the annoying
thing, "this is unusual. This, I am
convinced, will bear investigation,"
So lie prcoeeded to investigate, and
found that lie had been walking in a
circle, and had fallen into the same
one three times.
BO C A.C CI0
Tableau
English sport shoes-Camel's hair
golf hose-Impeccable plus-fours-
One of these white sweaters with a
little colored rim-Flawless tie-And
a frosh pot. . . .
* *.*
Another thing that kicks holes in
our nervous system is the idea of a
small-town department store gettingr
out advertisements with French words
and phrases scattered through them
like prunes in a pie. It doesn't make
it a great deal more aggravating that
some of the words are spelt wrong,
hntthq no will servP e as asaMnle

i
I
I
r
I

The Sure Thing ani The Galll1ie
Back in the (lays when George Iii
was king of England, one, Robert Ed-
wards, was given a grant of land as a
reward. The land, 160 acres, ex-
tended from the battery to Park Row
and from Broadway to the Hudson
River in Manhattan. In 1750 the land
was leased for 99 years and at the ex-
piration of that time the lease was
renewed for another 99 year perio~i.
This second lease expires in 1948, or
so the story goes.
Now Warren Edwards, a Cincinnati
policeman, is ghting for the posses-
sion of the 160 acres of land. That
small slice of land is valued almost
beyond calculation. It included tie
sites of the Woolworth Building, the
Singer building, Adams Express, the
American Express, the Iudson term-
imal, and a few others. Policeman
Edwards hopes to acquire the proper-
ty which his ancestor leased in 1854
but at the same time he sticks to his
job. That's good policy. Many are
willing to abandon a sure thing to
gamble on an air castel.
The Unfortunate Frogs
Even the situation in Europe has
its amusing side. Someone tells a
story about two frogs that fell into
a tub of cream. One frog drowned
immediately, but the other, a nor:'
resolute specimen, kept on umpm g
until morning found a live frog sit-
'ting upon a roll of golden butter.
The mess; on the continent-is somic-
what analagous. Most of the coun-
tries are in the position of the two
unfortunate amphibians. That the
Germans abandoned passive resist-
ance immediately and unconditional-
ly is a great victory for France. Like -
wise it is a victory for Germany.
to now on the verge of ruin, the open-
ing of their economic stronghold may

farticular
eopi

x

~-Vid ~ ~ ~ ~ cn~lbl'e to
alL iartila poot _;q,_tIBC' tra nsaction!

satisfy
is ne v-

~"CU a~ ~ H ~i illvin our linen,
laundered propc lv o re'tiiecoil time, send us

State at Columbus last year are eag-
erly awaiting the contest which- is
to take place on Ferry Field on Oc-
tober 20. The intense rivalry which
has grown up between the two
schools during the past few years has
nmade this .game the most popular one
on the Michigan schedule. Already
nearly the entire number of seats
avaiable for the game have been sold
- and the lodging houses of Ann Arbor
art beginning to feel the strain.
Ohio State is coming to Ann Ar-
bor with a team that is out to win.
She is also sending a host of loyal'
backers who believe that the team can
w'n. They are all coming with a
determined spirit but-more than a
friendly spirit. A determination on
both sides to win is necessary to
inmake the game interesting but friend-
linessisenecessary to make the game

sourne t huJ~e;~. 2 vhat\7asit

serVIce

PHONEi LIBERTY
2076 / /!j / M
FIFTH A
2077 Co.

ST.
WE.

a I

.

. ,. _ _ ~ i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan