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November 22, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-11-22

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND SOMEWHAT
COOLER

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LEASED WIRE SERVICE
ASSOCTATED PRESS
TE:l BER
WESTERN FCONFERENCE
EDITOIAL1 AsSOCIATION

___ICE. ...FIV ... CEr:TS

,-k

VOL. XXXIV. No. 52

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1923

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CP:NT3

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FREMEN GTHE
IN SPIRITED MEET
FORSPRING .GAMES.
CAPTAIN AND LIEUTENANTS FOR
CONTEST CHOSEN BY 90
YEARLINGS
SOPHOMORES PICK HEAD
AT MASS MEETING TODAY
contests Are Desribed and Rules
Explained for Benefit
of New Men
Spirited cheering, mob attendance
and a determined attitude constituted
the noticeable features of he all-fresh-
man meeting held yesterday afternoon
in the Union. More than 900 yearlings
were present, and showed a determina-
tion to fight the games to a finish
Howard A. Donahue, '24, managing
editor of The Daily, addressed the
class, explaining the games and their
rules. He announced that the time
of starting the games had been chang-
ed from 10 o'clock to. 9:30 o'clock Sat-
urday morning, which necessitates
assembling the classes at 9 o'clock.
The cane spree, obstacle race and flag
rush were explained carefully, and the
rules were read and made clear.
Donahue particularly stressed the
point in the rules to the effect that
the participants in all events must
wear tenils shoes.
Stuart Named Captain
After the address, the election of the
captain was. conducted, resulting in
the naming of John Stuart, '27, to head
the yearlings in the contests. Cheer-
leaders led the crowd in cheers for '27
and Michigan,. while the votes were
being counted.
At a meeting of the class presidents
and Stuart, held later, lieutenants for
the games were appointed. The men
selected to aid Stuart are: Theodore
Hornberger, '27; Thomas King, '27E;
Joseph Clifford, '27; Dan Weiss, '27;
M. Boroles, '27;: Clare W. Sabin, '27;
William Flora, '27 Ed.; Dwight Keller,!
'27; Richard Morrison, '27; Russell
Davis, '27 Ed.; Victor Dorhft-'
and Howard Hamilton, '27 Ed.
Sophomores Meet Today
It was decided at this meeting that
all the freshmen who play band instru-
ments will meet for filrst practite in
the upper reading- room of the Union
at 7:30 o'clock tonight, together with
the lieutenants and all freshman
trackmen
The sophomore meeting in prepara-
tion for the games will be held at 5
o'clock this afternoon in the upper
reading room of the Union. At this
time important announcements in re-
gard to th games will -be made, and
the captain elected.
Gargoyle To Make
j4ppearance Today
Blazing in a coat of blue dashed
with black and red the football num-
ber of Gargoyle, campus humor publi-
cation, will appear tomorrow morning.
The number will be distinctly and en,
tirely deyoted to the gridiron sport,
the sport of the, hour. In particular
it will be devoted to the big home-
coming game, the contest with the
Gophers from Minnesota.
Artists' pens and brushes have been
wielded with such vigor during the
past month that Gargoyle will present
three full pages of art work bearing
the signatures, M. Van Every, '24, Clay-
ton Seagars, grad., and Halsey David-
son, '25.
In an attempt to make the publica-
tion representative, 25 contributors
have found space in the November
issue.

Portia to Discuss William A. White
Portia Literary society will meet at
7 o'clock tonight in room 302, Mason
hall. The topic for discussion is "The
Life and Career of William Allen
White" and the speakers are: Phyllis
Turnbull, '26, Margaret Milnes, '26, and
Alphra Ladd, '25. .
New York, Nov. 21.-Prohibition
agents seized about $100,000 worth o
liquor in a raid this afternoon on the
West Broadway warehouse of Baird
and Daniels company.

Triangles Add
Ten Engineers
Ten juniors of the engineering
school scrubbed their way into T-
angles, honorary junior engineering
society, yesterday and were officially
initiated into that organization at a
banquet held Ut 6:30 o'clock last night
a the Union. The engineering arch
was given its semi-annual cleaning in
the afternoon as the men showed their1
ability and right to the. honor of being
selected for the society.
Those initiated are the following: F.
H. Andrews, W. S. Haring, L. A.
Maeder, K. B. Robertson, J. W. Gow,
W. W. Kerr, 0. W. Reed, Nathaniel
Ely, E. M. Graves, and R. L. Under-
wood.
f,
CAM PU STO w&HuE
IN HONOR OF TEAM
Band; Speakers Will Be Present At
Giant Convocation
Tomorrow
TO PROJECT PHOTOGRAPHS
ON SCREEN FOR AUDIENCE
"Beat Minnesota!" will be the
watchword when all Michigan gath-
ers in Hill auditorum at 5 o'clock
to do homage to its unbeaten Varsity.
The spirit which will not be downed is
already gripping the student body,
flushed as it is with he season's vic-
tories, and filled with the desire to
see the Maize and Blue emerge un-
scathed from the autumnal battle
fields.
Reports indicate that large numbers
of alumni, planning to attend the an-
nual homecoming, will arrive in Ann'
Arbor early in order to attend the gi-
gantic pep-gathering. As it is the
second such meeting to be held this
fall, the committee in charge feels
confident that it will be one of the
largest gatherings ever held at Mich-
-igan on the eve of' a difficult battle.
Edmund C. Shields, '96L, prominent
Lansing alumnus, has been secured
L ge, prin i ei eaker;°During-hs-
college days, Selds played Varsity
baseball, being at one time captain of
the team. In addition, Lionel Crocker
'18, -of the public speaking depart-
ment will tell what the faculty thinks
of the approaching struggle. John W.
Kelly, '24L, will have charge of the
meeting, and will attempt to voice
the sentiments of the student' body
The auditorium will open at 4:30
o'clock and the meeting will com-
mence promptly at 5 o'clock. The
Varsity band will furnish music,
while the cheering squad, led by Ly-
man Glasgow, '25, will lead the
Icheers.
In addition pictures of the coaches
and team and the words of Michigan
songs will be thrown on a screen.
PROFK PULLING GIVES
1LECTURE ON "DEMONS"

NEWPAR1TY BOOMS
FORD NOMiNATION
PLATFORM TO CONTAIN THREE
PL ANKS;RESERVE BANK
ATTACKED)
ORGANIZATION AIDED
BY LABORITE FACTION1
Resolutions Calling a Convention at
Detroit Are Adopted
By Group
Omaha, Nov. 21.-Resolutions form-
lly calling a convention at Detroit,
December 12, endorsing Henry Ford,
for president on a ticket to be known
as that of the "people's progressive
party" and outlining three planks of
a platform to be submitted to the con-
vention, were adopted by the group of
progressives, farmers laborites, inde-
pendents, and liberals headed by Roy:
M, Harrot, national temporary chair-
man of the progressive party, here
today.
Fifteen states were represented ac-
cording to a statement given out by
Mr. Harrot. The names of those who
issued the call, Mr. Harrot said, in-
cluded: F. S. Hammond, Elizabeth,
N. J.; W. Bennington, Cleveland; and'
representatives of the progressive
party in the West and South.
The three planks of the proposed
platform endorsed at today's confer-
ence are: To relieve the distress of
agriculture and industry; (1) the es-
tablishment of a debt paying system
of government owned banks instead of
the private owned monopoly of mon-
ey and credit, the federal reserve sys-
tem; (2) making the transportation
system a means of public service and
not speculative gain, through govern-
ment ownership of railroads, same to
be paid for at a fair valuation in full
legal tender currency; (3), prevent
future chaoticunemployment condi-
tions and future squandering of nat-
ural resources by wasteful and fraud-
ulent contracts and subsidies to mon-
opoli stnd profiteers through the de-
velopment of our natural resources to
be paid for in full legal tender is-
sued direct by the government.
SEINTOR LAD URGES
FORD SHOALS PROJECTI
Washington, Nov. 21.-A statement
urging acceptance of Henry Ford's of-
fer for the Muscle Shoals Alabama
Power and Fertilizer project was is-
sued today by Senator Ladd, republic-
an, North Dakota, who also quoted
from a recent letter by Bernard M.
Baruch, former chairman of the warI
industries board, on the Ford offer.
Senator Ladd said he had sought Mr
Baruch's opinion since the sale of the
Gorgas power plant had changed the
basis of Mr. Frod's offer.
Mr. Baruch believes in the devel-
opment of Muscle Shoals as a great
industrial plant for the manufacture
of nitrogen compounds and fertilizer
for use in agriculture, said Senator
Ladd.
"My own studies have led me to the
same conclusion and my investigation
made during the past summer in
Germany and Norway only the more
strongly confirm my belief in the
possibilities of the great undertaking
at Muscle Shoals for the manufacture
of commercial fertilizers.
"If there was any other offer more
favorable than Mr. Ford's offer, they
would not hesitate to accept. Mr.
Ford's offer is the only one that pro
poses to utilize the opportunities of-

fered at this plant."
Mr. Baruch in his letter to Senator
Ladd referred to his letter of last
January to Graysilver, of the Amer-
ican farm bureau federation in which
he said concerning the Ford offer that
"after all it is the ftxing of nitrogen
that is the crux of the whole contract.
I am quite sure that the contract
means to cover this point, but it
should be made clear."
|--
LAN TO SPEAKON
INSTITUTE OF POLITIC~t

IWOMAN ARRESTED WEARING
f LOOTED) SILK UNDERWEAR
Berlin, Nov. 21.-The police
picked up a girl on the street
as a suspicious character. She
was taken to headquarters. Made
to disrobe, the girl was found to
be wearing underclothing made
from the costliest silks and1
satins used in altar decorations
in churches. Others of her gar-
ments were made of velvet also
stolen from church, altars, some
of them still retaining sacred
Isymbols. She said her sweet-
heart gave her the loot fromf
church robbing expeditions.
f
OPERA1 TICKETS GO
ON GENRLSALE
All Men Students Get 'Applications
Today and Tomorrow; Women
Wednesday
UNION MEMBERS MUST RETURN
ORDERS BY TOMORROW NIGHT
Applications for tickets to "Cotton
Stockings," eighteenth annual Union
opera, that will open its local run at
the Whitney theater Dec. 3, will be
given, to all male students of the Uni-
versity at the main desk of the Union
today and tomorrow. ' All lfe mem-
bers of the Union have already had
preference in the securing of seats for
the show.
Mail orders both for life members
and for regular members of the Union
that have been given out must be re-
turned to the Union by tomorrow night
in order to receive preference. The
applications have been given out dur-
ing the past week allowing a prefer-
ence to members of the cast and
choruses of the show and to members
of the Union.
A box -office sale for women of the
University will be held from 2 to 5
o'clock next Wednesday in the ticket
booth of Hill auditorium. The tickets
will be available only to University
women at this time.
A general bo' o"-:ale will opew
the next day at the tcket booth of
the Whitney and continue through the
run of the show here. Tickets will be
sold to townspeople and any others
who wish to buy them at this time.
The price of tickets for the local
run is the same this year as last. The
entire lower floor will sell for $2.50,
I while the balcony seats will be sold at
$2 and $1.50. The opera will hold its
local performances every night 'of the
week beginning Monday, Dec. 3, and
with a Saturday afternoon matinee as
well.
ENGINEERING SOCIETY
INITITSNEOPHYTES
Prof. H. E. Riggs of the civil engi-
neering department, spoke at the fall
initiation banquet of the American So-
ciety of Civil Engineering held last
night at the Union. The subject of
the talk was "The American Society
of Chemical Engineering."
Present at the banquet were thle
following initiates: R. G. Curtis, '24E;
C. W. DeClark, '24E; C. T. Dust, '24E;
C. G. Merriman, '24E; C. A. Miller
1'24E; A. M. Nelson, '24E; H. S. Schief-
er, '24E; J. E. Wark, '24E; R. L. Whit-
aker, '24E; D. A. Zinn, '24E; K. B.
Robertson, '25E; T. J. Seburn, '25E;
F. M. Freman, '25E; L. A. Maeder
''25E; and F. A. Kimmick, '25E.
E. B. Shepard, '24E, acted as toast-
master and C. G. Merriman, '24E, rep-
I resented the initiates.

YA1LE ANNOUNCES 1924
tI FOOTBALL SCHEUL[
New Haven, Nov. 21.-The 1924 grik
t schedule of Yale was announced her(
tonight. The only change from thi
year's list places Dartmouth in th
place of Bucknell, scheduling the gam
for Oct. 18. The meeting with Dart
mouth will mark the first game be
tween the two colleges since 1900. Th
agreement for the Yale-Dartmout!
game next season is for one seasoj
only.
f -
11 Debating Society
d To Meet Tonigh
g
Lt Alpha Nu- debating society will mee
at 7:30 tonight in the Alpha Nu room
y on the fourth floor of University hal
y There will be several speeches b

m o s O S W H E L N I ETBULLETIN TO REICH

ALLIES INSIST KAISER BE
TENTED FROM
RETURNING

PRE-1

ENGLISH, FRENCH MAKE
CONCESSIONS '10 AGREE
Poincaire's Representatives Drop Ob-
jection to Prince's
Freedom
Paris, Nov. 21.-The allies through
their representatives in the ambassa-
dors council tonight agreed to notify
Germany that the interallied military
control mission will resume its func-
tions in the Reich and that the Berlin
government is bound to afford it facili-
ties and protection. They also decided
upon a second communication in which
they noted the formed crown prince's
letter renunclating the throne of
Prussia and voiced expectations that
the German government will see to itJ
that Frederick William faithfully ob-
serves the promises made therein.
Under those conditions the allies will
not insist upon laying hold of the
Prince, but they declare the German
government must rigidly adhere to
its assurance that the return of form-
er Kaiser Willam to Germany will
not be tolerated
This is the first time the allies have
agreed upon a question relating to the
execution by Germany of the treaty of
Versailles since the partition of upper
Silesia was referred to the League of
Nat'ons two years ago.
The unusual sensation of leaving a
meeting in full accord appeared par-
ticularly agreeable to the members of
the council, who came out of the clock-
room of the foreign office radiant.r
Marshall Foch, who usually passes1
the line of reporters with military dig-
nity, stopped to say the cheer word,
'everything is all right.'
The agreement was reached py mu-
Stul concessions on the part of France
and Great Britain. The former with-
drew from its stand that the notes'
should take the form of an ultimatum
and indicate to the German govern-
ment the measures to be taken by the,
allies if the demand were not met.
The British consented to a change in
the wording to satisfy objections on
the part of the French cabinet.
The spirit of give and take which re-
sulted in saving the entante is re-
garded as the best augury for settle-
ment ofthe other question on which
Fr'ance and Great Britain are divided,
although there appears to be some ap-
prehension in French circles as to
how parliament will receive the am-
bassadors'. conclusion.

Mighty Sphinx
Confides In 10
Once again the might Sphinx un-
folded its secrets to 10 men from the
junior class of the literary school
after they had completed the long and
weary voyage down the Nile. Trials
and tribulations were undergone in
the trip across the hot sands of the
Sahara but at last the men reached
their final destination.
The men chosen for Sphinx, hon-
orary junior literary society, and who
were initiated at the seni-annual
banquet held at the Union last night
are I. F. Deister, T. E. Fiske, J. G.
Garlinghouse, C. S. Hough, R. J. Hum-
mer, C. D. Livingston, H. W. McCobb,
J. K. Miller, H. O. Steele and L. G.
Wittman.
CO0MIC OPERA HERE
FOR SHOW TONIGHT
Hinshaw Brings Excellent Cast For
Presentation of Mozart's
Masterpiece
WILL USE ENGLISH VERSION
WRITTEN BY AMERICAN CRITIC

SECND TTEMPT
TO HALT WALTO N'S
EX-GOVERNOR CHARGES CONSPI-
RACY BETWEEN KLAN AND
LEGISLATORS
SAYS HE IS READY FOR
ARREST; JURY SILENT

Expect Fight Will Go To
States Supreme Court
For Retrial

United

"Cosi fan Tutte", Mozart's attrac-
tive opera comique, with Irene Wil-
liams in the leading role, will be giv-
en at 8 o'clock tonight in .Hill audi-
torium as the. third concert in the
Choral Union series. William Wade
Hinshaw, who presented the "Impre-
sario" which was so successful here
last year, is in charge of the produc-
tion.
Shortly after Mr. Hinshaw organ-
ized the present company for a tour
of the country, the Metropolitan
Opera company announced it as one1
of their new operas for the season.
So great was its success that it was
repeated in, New York several times.
The English version for the opera
was written by the late Henry Ed-
ward Krehbiel, dean of American mu-
sic critics.
The theme of the opera is woven
around the assertion that it is wo-
man's nature to flirt. The efforts of
one man to prove the assertion and
two to disprove it, make up the story,
with the result of a mirthful mix-up,
allowing for unique and even dramatic
situations.
The cast is made up of able Ameri-
can artists who have found great fav-
or with the critics in their presenta-
tion of this Opera. Elliott Schenck,
noted conductor, has been chosen for
the position of musical director. Thej
characters are cast as follows:
Dorabella) ............ Ellen Rumsey
( sisters.!

Oklahoma City, Nov. 21.--J. C.
Walton failed today in his second ef-
fort to obtain federal intervention
in the action of the State Senate
Court of Impeachment which Monday
removed him as governor.
Judge John H. Cotteral, in federal
court here, reaffirming a ruling hand-
ed down at Lawton, Okla., the day be-
fore the impeachment trial opened,
held that his court had no jurisdiction
in the case and sustained a motion by
George F. Short, state attorney gen-
eral, to dismiss the deposed execu-
tive's suit..
Walton entered an exception to the
decision and announced that he would
appeal to the United States Supreme
Court.
The former governor sought a re-
troactive restraining order to nullify
all proceedings of the impeachment
courts. He alleged his impeachment
resulted from a conspiracy between
the Ku Klux Klan and members or
the legislature.
At the conclusion of the hearing
Walton went to the Oklahoma county
court house and announced that he
expected to be indicted by the district
I court grand jury now in session. He
said he did not know what the 6harg-
es would be but desired to be present
to submit to arrest at once. He
waited for some time but the grand
jury did not report today.
SIGA UELTA CHI PICKS
UPPING NAI NAL ED

"Man's problems of life can only be I
solved through his knowledge of the:
properties and habits of the 'daemons'l
of science," said Prof. H. E. Pulling of 1
the plant physiology department of
Wellesley college in a University lec-
ture yesterday afternoon in Natural
Science auditorium.
"These daemons or spirits of sci-
ence are still the same as those of old.
They have habits, most of which are
permanent. The ancients did not.
know this; therein lies the secret of
our superiority over the scientists oft
old. But this knowledge has been
costly, as some daemons kill the men
who seek to know them better."
The lecture was illustrated by a var-
iety of slides. Among them was one1
that showed the mathematical relation'
1of the spirits as the ancients knew
them: air, water, earth, and fire, and
their intermediates, dry, cold, heat,
and wet. It was formerly believed that
this circle contained some of the
fundamental properties of man's mind.
Professor Pulling said that instead
of calling this the age of industry and
progress we should call it an age of
dissipation of free enrgy. "It is hard
to control the daemons of energy," he
said. "Some escape and some lie
dormant as potential energy.

PORTMANTIU PLERS
iTO COME HERE TUESDAYI
Stuart Walker's Portmanteau Play-
ers in an afternoon and evening per-
formance will be the next number of
the Oratorical lecture course program
for this yeartobe given next Tuesday
in Hill auditorium.
At 4 o'clock in the afternoon theI
company will present "The Gods ofl
the Mountains" and "The Murderers,"
bothby Lord Dunsany, and in the eve-j
ning performance scheduled to begi4
at 8:15 o'clock "The Book of Job" will
be given.
A special ticket sale for these per-
formances will be held from 2 to 5
o'clock Monday afternoon at the box
office in Hill auditorium. Course
tickets will be sold at that time at
the regular prices and single admis-
sion tickets may be purchased for $1.
FIRST 'DENISHAWN MAIL
ORDERS SENT YESTERDAY}
Mail order applications for the per-
formance of the Denishawn dancers
on Monday night Nov. 26, in Hill aud-
itorium were filled yesterday and sent
out. All orders will be mailed out
by today. Applications were filled in
the order in which they were received,
Union life members getting first pref-
erence.
A general sale of tickets will take
place in the lobby of the Union Fri-
day afternoon.
COURT COMMISIONEIR
J minrn tuinrnpr RIT-

Leonora )}. .. ..Irene Williams
Despina, their waiting maid....
.~Lillian Palmer
Ferrando, betrother to Dorabella...
.Judson House-
Guglielmo, betrothed to Leo'nora...
.................Leo de Hierapolis
Don Alfonso, a bachelor cynic....
..............Pierre Remington
A few tickets for this concert are
Still available at the School of Music.
ST. PAUL ASSOCIATION
HEARS HAWLEY TAPPING
Special to The Daily
St. Paul, Minn., Nov. 21.-Hawley
Tapping, '16L, field secretary of the
University of Michigan Alumni-asso-

By Special CorrOspondent
Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 21.-T.
Hawley Tapping, '16L, of Ann Arbor
was elected by acclaim to the presi-
dency of Sigma Delta Chi, national
professional journalistic fraternity, at
the closing session of its ninth annual
convention in the Minnesota Union to-
day.
Mr. Tapping is an alumnus of Michi-
gan chapter of Sigma Delta Chi which
Iwon another signal honor yesterday
when an alumnus Roy J.Freicken of
the Chicago Daily News staff was
awarded a $100 gold piece for merit-
ious reporting. Mr. Tapping is retir-
ing national secretary of the organiza-
tion. He is field secretary of the Mich-
igan Alumni association. and associate
editor of the Michigan Alumnus. The
convention elected James Wright
Brown, editor of Editor and Publisher
magazine, as honorary president. It
selected the University of Indiana as
the next meeting place of the conven-
tion.
Following were the other officers
elected: Donald Clark of Kansas City,
first vice president; Prof. R. R. Bar-
low of the 'University of Minnesota,
second vice president; George Picrrot
of the American Boy magazine, De-
troit, secretary; Peter Vischer of the
New York World,. treasurer; W. E.

ciation, spoke here tonight before the
University of Michigan club of this
city. He will talk tomorrow in Sioux
Falls, South Dakota, to the alumni
there.
Mr. Tapping is making a 10 day trip
through the middle-west, speaking be-
fore Michigan alumni clubs in order
to explain the plan of the recent re-
organization of the Alumni associa-
tion. He has made several trips
through his own state and through
New York, Illinois, and Iowa, since
taking office last spring.
The field secretary left Ann Arbor
last Thursday and spoke in Rockford,
Ill., on Friday. Saturday he, with
other alumni association officials, had
charge of a registration bureau that
was mainta'ned at the Park hotel in
Madison, Wis., Saturday, when Mich-
igan played Wisconsin.
He plans to return to Ann Arbor by
Saturday in order to be present-at the
Michigan-Minnesota game and to wel-
come alumni who come to town to
attend.

Dripps, of Des Moines, alumni secre-
tary. Executive councillors chosen
were Prof. R. R. Lord, Ohio State uni-
versity; Arthur Braten, Merchant
Trade journal, Des Moines; Prof.
Lawrence Murphy, North Dakota; and
Roy French, Wisconsin.
Freshman Glee
Clu b Elects Head
Election of officers was held at a
meeting of the freshman glee club
held at 7 o'clock last night in the
Union. The following men were
elected as officers: E. L. Blaser, '27,
president; R. McEliey, '27, vice- resi-
dent; G. K. Tracy, '27, secretary and
treasurer; 0. Kroeger, '27, librarian.

DON'T BE RIDICULOUS
The workmen who were striv-
ing so hard to tear down the
poor, defenseless University Fire.
Station had such a hard time be-
cause they did not take advan-
ftkr? of the efflienvo ff the

Walter W. -McLaren, professor c
'ILLHOLD economics and secretary of the Wil-
liamstown Institute of Politics, wi]
UIIIRR IL address members of the faculty an
others interested upon the comin
session of the Institute of Politics a
4 o'clock today in Clements library.
Sophomore literary students will This institute originated about thre
hodU an informal smoker at 7:30 years ago, and has sessions ever

DAILY EDITORIAL STAFF
SEEKS ADDITIONAL MEMBERS
The Daily editorial staff can
use a few more tryouts. Repor-
torial and night staff positions
are immediately available to such
+tr.outs

Health Service
" A 4A( AI 0 T-f (r r f y

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