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November 18, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-11-18

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND SOMEWHAT
COOLER

<L

Ar Ar
4lut r

Lu3 xll

Section

One

TWENTY PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CEN'

VOL. XXXIV. No. 49

TWENTY PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1923

TWENTY PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CEN

-- r"--- - -'

WALTON ARCHES
T
IN IDST OFTRIL
STATES HE COULD NOT ENDURE+
SHAME OF UNFAIR PRO-.
CEEDINGS
ATTORNEY S ASTOUNDED
A T ACT O F GOVERNOR
Withdrawal Comes After His Council
Fails to Introduce lian
Angl
Oklahoma City, Nov. 17-(By A.P.)
-The impeachment trial of Gov. J. C.
Walton unexpectedly was speeded to-
ward an early conclusion today when
the executive announced that he could
no longer "bear under the humiliation"
of an "unfair trial" and walked from1
the court room.
The executive's departure came a
few hours before the time set for the
prosecution to rest and on the eve
of his expected presentation of evi-
'denc in defense of charges of moral
turpitude, neglect of duty, corruption
din office and incompetency.
Governor Withdraws
The withdrawal gave strong evi-
dence that a final vote on acquital or
conviction would be obtained Monday.
The governor's unexpected leave-tak-
ing precipitated a scene unprecedet-
ed since the trial opened. Finishing
a short statement in which he an-
nounced his 'intention, the executive
turned, and with his wife on his arm,
walked the length of the Senate chai-
ber to the door, the members of his
counsel following.
Court members, amazed, watched in
silence while the prosecution started
at the empty chairs around the defense
table.
The governor's party, had almost
reached the door when Senator
Charles E. MclPherren, of Durant,
moved that :the trial proceed..
The chamber suddenly becathe a
scene of tumult. The cry for "go
'ahead" went up on all sides.
Notion Fails
But before the prosecution could
continue its interrogation of Aldrich
Blake, the Governor's former confiden-
tial adviser, on a motion, was made
to empower the court to appoint
counsel for the executive, but it was
voted down after the senators had
declared that his departure gave evi-
dence that he did not wish represen-
tatio.
- During this argument Senator Tom
Anglin of, Holdenvile, president pro-
tem declared that Tom Neal, a mem-
ber of the governor's council had ask-
ed that all defense subpoeneas for
witnesses be dismissed.
I. P. Sprague, one of the governor's
attorneys, who had tarried at the door,
Reclared he did mot believe that Neal
had made such a request.
Anglin infuriated
Anglin dashed madly at Sprague.
Senators and Sargeant at Arms sprang
between the two men and the session
broke up in a hasty recess.
Senators gathered in excited groups
marched about the chamber and a see-
bnd threatened clash was narrowly
averted when friends interposed in an
argument between Senators AE. .
Darnell, of Clinton, and John Golo
bie, of Guthrie
The governors withdrawal came
soon after his counsel had failed in
a determined effort to introduce what
appeared to be a Ku Klux Klan angle
'into the testimony dealing with the
charge that the executive has illegal-

ly appointed a large number of known
criminals and irresponsible persons as
special state police.
Burton Returns
From Long Tour
President Marion L. Burton, who
has been away the past week on a
speaking tour, will return to Ann Ar-
bor today. President Burton has ad-
dressed audiences in Chicago, Kan-
sas City, and St. Louis and ,attended
the inauguration of Dr. Stratton D.
Brooks, '96, as president of the Uni
versity of Missouri at Columbia where
he was principal speaker and the offi
cial representative of the University.
The convention of the national as-
sociation of state universities at Chi-
cago was attended by President Bur
ton last Wednesday. On Thursday, he
addressed the Michigan alumni of

Elsie Janis
Play In

Will
.Ypsilanti

Elsie JaniR, musical :comedy rand
vaudeville star, will give a program
of character songs, costume dances,
and impersonations, tomorrow night
at 8 o'clock in the lease auditorium.4
Ypsilanti. Miss Janis appears as the
artist for the first of five concert pro-
grams to be offered this season by the'
Normal conservatory. She is accom-
panied by a concert company made up
of violinist, pianist and tenor, thus
blending the light lyric stage with the
concert platform, "This," says Miss
Janis, "is the idealĀ¢ concert for the
whole public."
This, Miss Janis' first concert tour,
has been made possible by spe.cial ar-
rangement with Charles B. Dilling-
ham, her manager. Drafting Miss Jan-I
is from musical comedy and better{
vaudeville, is an experiment which has
proved successful. She is hailed as
one of the most delightful imperson-
ators on the stage, and possesses, be-
sides an attractive voice, grace of
movement; and a charming person-
ality.
Course tickets for the series of five"
concerts are priced at $3.00, and single
admissions for Miss Janis' concert are
on sale at $2.00. Phone reservations
may be made at the Normal conserv-
atory, Ypsilanti.
FORD SHOALS PLAN1
TO BE RE-ElXAMINED

OPERA WIL HAVE'I
EOF INEST ORDER
SPECIAL EFFECTS ARE TO BE OR-
TAINED BY USE OF GIANT
BULBS
TO CARRY EQUIPMENT
IN ANNUAL ROAIJ TOUR'
Plan Spotlights of All Descriptions
In Making Spectacular
Scenes
Electrical equipment for the Union
opera "Cotton Stockings" this year is
as complete as that of any travelling
theatrical organization, and is super-
ir to that of any college or amateur
show in the country. A new portable
switchboard which has just been
completed will make "Cotton Stock-
ings" equipped electrically as well as
any show possibly can be.
Spotlights of every description,;
"baby spots", calcium lights, thous-
and watt lamps, artists lamps, ski-
opticons, and everything known to
stage electricians will be used in the
eighteenth annual opera which has its
opening night Monday, December 3, at,
the Whitney theater for a week's run.
Participating life members will re-
ceive mail order applications for
tickets tomorrow and will be given
two {lays' precedence over the next
succeeding classes.
Independent Equipment
For the first time in its history, the
Union opera will be entirely Inde-
pendent of the electrical equipment in
the theaters in the fifteen cities in the
East and Middle West in which it
will play during the Christmas vaca-
tion. The portable switchboard needs
just one connection in every theater,
that with the main line in the theater
and the show is ready to go on. For-
merly the show was dependent upon
the local theater's electrician, and its
stage lighting.
The electricians of the 1924 opera
are as necessary as the principals in
the cast, so important are the lighting
effects, and that is the reason that
the opera organization decided to
make itself electrically independent
and complete. The portable switch-
board Is equipped to carry all the
voltage required for the show, and it
L also has facilities for dimming all of,
its lights to get the smooth change
I in lighting instead of the broken effect
of abrupt switches.
Calcium Lights Provided
Spotlights are needed in abundance
for "Cotton Stockings". Twice the
number of "baby spots" are required
this year over the nees of the or-
dinary show. From the flys and foot-
lights 26 "baby spots" will play on
the smaller details on the stage and in
the scenery. A battery of four cal-
cium; lights will play on the members
of the cast and chorus from the bal-
cony.
Two artists lamps, peculiar dome
shaped lamps which measure more
than three feet will hang over art-
(Continued on Page Two)

UNSTABEI HN
AS FI GHTINfG CROWS
SYSTEMATIC LOOTING MAKES CO-,
LOGNE SCENE OF RIOTS
AND DANGER
BAVARIAN GOVERNMENT
SURRENDERS C A P I TAL

ii

Separatists Continue to Detach
ritory from State; New
Republic Proclaimed

Ter-

Bill to be Introduced in House
- Representative McKenzie
or Madden

by

NEW PROVISION MADE FOR 1
CONSTRUCTION OF PLANT I
Washington, Nov. 17--(By A.P.)-
Acceptance of Henry Ford's offer for
the Muscle Shoals, Alabama, water
power and fertilizer project, through
government construction of a new
steam auxiliary power . plant to re
place the Gorgas plant disposed of
recently to the Alabama Power Co.,
is provided. in a bill prepared by Rep-
resentative Madden, Republican, Ill.,
for introduction immediately upon the,
assembling of the new congress.
The bill will be introduced either
by Representative Madden or by Rep-#
'esentative McKenzie, Republican, Ill.,
from the committee which originally
broughtforth the legislation which
died in the last congress, and will
be similar to the original legislation
except for the addition of a new sec-
tion designed to meet conditions re-
sulting from the sale of the Gorgas
steam power plant.
Under the new section, representa-
-tive Madden would have the govern-
ment, through the war department,
substitute an auxilliaryesteam power
plant capable of developing 40,000
horse power. The bill would author-
fize construction of the plant directly
by the government or its construction,
under contract, by Henry Ford or his
corporation.
SENATE HALTS. ACTION
ON VETERANS BUREAU
Washington, Nov. 17-(By A.P.)-
Senate investigation of the veteran's
bureau was steered back today into
Chartered channels. Announcing that
the committee of enquiry was "very
much" disturbed by the "irrevalent
and scandalous" testimony offered
yesterday during .the defense of
Charles H. Forbes, chairman Reed.
said the committee would receive nc
more evidence of that character.
Six witnesses were heard during
the day as the defense of the former
director was pressed and swinging in-
to the first overtime session the com-
mittee recalled tonight for cross ex-
amination, Elias H. Mortimer, of Phil-
adelphia, star witness against Forbes.

Dusseldorf, Nov. 17.-(By A. P.)-'
The separatists continue to detach
territory in the Rhineland from the
German republic by proclamation
and today they proclaimed a Rhine-
land Republic at Sthifferstadt, in the
Palatinate, and took over the admin-
istration of affairs at Rockenhausen.
But they are meeting with consider-
able resistance.
At Himberg, in the district of Neu-
wied, a regular battle occurred yes-
terday between . the : separatists andE
peasants. The peasants were armed
with revolvers and hand grenades and
15 separatists were killed and a num-
her injured.
Eight Killed
Fighting was resumed this morning
at liommef and eight persons were
killed and more than 60 wounded. A
children's sanitar : m at Neuwied was
converted into a hospital for the care
of the injured.
At the request of the delegates of
the allied high commission at Bomm
a company of infantry was sent to
Hommef to restore order and disarm
the populace. A thousand separatists
were disarmed 'without resistance, but
many of the anti-separatists fled and
a detachment was sent in pursuit.
Looting Extended
French dragoons have surrounded
the woods where the anti-separatists
took refuge and are searching for
them. The Bavarian Palatinate gov-
ernment *which was ..obliged to sur-
render Steyer its capitol to the sep-
atatists has installed itself at Lud-
wighafen.
At Cologne a systematic looting
which has been going on for the past
three days, extended to private houses.
State Teachers Serve 3A Years
Lansing, Mich., Nov. 17.-The an-
nual report of the Midhigan Teachers'
retirement fund board, for the year
ended;, shows there are 381 regular
annuitants with an average annuity
of $404.50 and 22 disability annuitants
with an average annuity of $256.34.
New York, Nov. 17-"Mamma" Ther-
ese Bartholdi, who for 20 years con-
ducted Bartholdi Inn, an actors' lodg-
ing house on Broadway, left an es-
tate of $1,250,000 when she died in
1920.

"Hail Michigan!
The Victors Return
The fighting'Wolverines bringing
added laurels for Michigan's crowvn
of victory will arrive at the Michi-
gan Central railroad station at 9
o'clock city time, this morning. Ev-
ery Michigan student who appre-
ciates the courage and perseverance
which this squad of men showed, in
the face of all difficulties, on the foot-
ball field at Madison yesterday will be
there to cheer them in, to welcome
them home, to publicly show his loy-
alty and his faith in this almost in-
vincible team.
In yesterday's game, another of the
Wolverines was seriously injured.
Jack Blott, who for three years has
exemplified the true Michigan spirit,
on and off the gridiron, was carried
from the field with a broken leg, nev-
er to play football for Michigan again.
On the train also will be "Utz" Uter-
itz, the brainy little quarterback, who
was taken from the field injured at
the Marinesgamerlast week and who
perhaps has worn a Michigan foot-
ball uniform for the last time.
The misfortunes which have be-
fallen these two veterans are the
misfortunes of a University. There
were other heroes, too, yesterday and
they are returning with a costly but
glorious victory this morning. The
train will arrive at 9 o'clock.
If you never met a team before,
obey the impulse this morning.
ECESLLCAE

Dy .VIC~~ . .. .. . .. .. . . . ..
[I period because of a broken ankle,
' Michigan's varsity football team fought
all the harder, and by means of a
IO solitary touchdown was able to win
from Wisconsin here this afternoon
by a 6 to 3 score,
The Wolverines were forced to cede
1'' first blood to the Cardinals 'when
ICaptain Marty Below booted over the
ball from the field for three points in
Hawkeyes Make Touchdown In Line "the opening period, but the Maize and
Plunge After {Award of 15 Yard -Blue came back in the second quarter
Pfea oand forged to the front when Rock-
Penaltywell,playing in place of Uteritz at
quarterback caught one of Tafrt's
MARTINEAU AND GARHAM SHINE punts on his own 40 yard line and
IN PERFORMANCE OF GAME raced 60 yards over the goal line for
the only Mchigan score.
17-(B A. I Protest Ekersall's Decisio
Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 17---(By A. Poetcrsal' Deson
P.)-Minnesota's flashy gridiron elev- Wisconsin players strenuously pro.
P.)-innsot's lash grdirn eev-tested the decision of Referee Walter
en playing with a dash that rolled Eckersall in giving the Wolverines a
back the years for thousands of old touchdown on the play claiming thai

WOLVERINE TEAM, CRIPPLED
BY LOSS OF BLOTTI UTERITZ
AND VANDERVOOR' T, WINS 6-i

1 HOW IT LOOKS SUMMARIZED
Forward Passes
Attempted by Michigan ......9
Completed ..................4
Attempted by Wisconsin ....12
( Completed ..................4.
I Intercepted by Michigan .... 1
Intercepted by Wisconsin .... 01
First Downs
M ichigan . ...................3
Wisconsin................3
Punts
By Michigan..............11
I Wisconsin 11

Veteran Referee in Danger
Studentsi Threaten to
Mob Him

When

CENTER OUT FOR SEASON WIT]
INJURY-LOSS FOR GOPHER
GAME
ROCKWELL GAINS POINT
AFTER SIXTY YARD RU!
Badgers Make Score in First Quarte
With Place Kick from 15
Yard Line
Madison, Wis., Nov. 17-Handicar
ped by the loss of three regulars bi
fore the opening of the game and b
the removal of Jack Blott in the fir,

PROTESTED DECISION STARTS
RIOT; PLAYERS MAKE RESCUE
Madison, Nov. 17.-There is no love
lost between the Wisconsin student
body and Referee Walter Eckersall to-
day.
The trouble started after Rockwell,
Michigan quarterback, made his sen-
sati6nal dash of 60 yards for a touch--
down and Eckersall awarded the six
'points regardless of 'the protest from
the Wisconsin team and rooters that
the ball had been grounded on Wis-
consin's 40 yard line.
"t- " " mte

grads participating in the home com-.
ing day celebration downed the hard1
fighting Iowa team here today 20 to 7.
Capt. Martineau, quarterback Gar-
ham and the line plunging Lidberg

the ball had been grounded on abc
the Wisconsin 40 yard line. Rockw
whendhe caught the ball, star
around his own left flank and r
advanced about 20 yards when he i
tackled by two or three men, A a

were the stellar performers in a con- ond later he emerged from the :
soheclaimstoand sprinted the remainder of the d
,test that . set the Gopher clams o. tance overi 'th'e lne. The touchdc
Western Conference championship Was allowed oWing to the fact t
considerably to the front with those the referee claimed that the ball
of Michigan and Illinois.. .r I never grounded. Steger failed to I
The Hawkeyes gave a performance goal after the score. Michigan.v
as brilliant as any showing they have distinctly off color' in the game to
shown this year but they met a super and thd absence of three regulars
!fr machine. gether with Blott weakened the to

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'Veserdi ridasu

CONFERENCE
Purdue 6, Northwestern 3.
Illinois 27, Mississippi Aggies 0.
Chicago 17, Ohio State 3.
Minnesota 20, Iowa 7.
Wabash 29, Indiana 6.,
WESTERN
Michigan Aggies 2, Detroit 0.
Dennison 7, Ohio University 7.
Nebraska 26, Iowa State 14.
Western Reserves 7, Oberlin 0.
Notre Dame 34, Butler 7._
Ohio Northern 21. Heidleberg 0.
Washington 13, Missouri 7.
N. Dakota Univ. 10, Carlton 3.
Miami 13, Univ. of Akron 13.
Ohio Wesleyan 40, St. Xavier 12.
Beloit 7, Cornell (Iowa) 6.
*Coe College 17, Grinnell 0.
Colorado Ag. 14, Colorado Mines 0
Des Moines Univ. 20, Morningside 7
,Colorado College 20, Denver U. 0.;
U. of Colorado 7, U.. of Utah 7.

Holy Cross 40, Springfield 0.
Rensselaer Poly 0, Clamkston 0.
Fordham 40, Col. of City of N. Y. 0.
Army 20, Bethany 0.
New Hampshire 21, Bates Q.
Ilaverford 13 Washington 7.
Boston College 41, Villa Nova 0.
Toledo Univ. 38, Detroit City Col. 0.
Univ. of Cincinnati 69, Case 0.
Dartmouth 62, Colby 0.
Canussius 30, Cleveland Univ. 0.
U. of Pitt. 13, W. and J. 6.
Williams 23, Amherst 7.
Columbia 21, N. Y. Univ. 0.
St. Johns 6, Providence 6.
Rutgers 21, Boston Univ. 0.
Lehigh 21, Alfred 0.
Ursinus 3, Franklin-Marshall 0.
Gettysburg 62, 1ebanon Valley 0.
Muehlemberg 16, Catholic U. 12.
U. of Rochester 13, U. of Buffalo 6.
Theil 13, Marietta 6.
Hobart 14, Niagara 7.
Whittenburg 28, Mt. Union 6.
Deleware 19, George Washington 7.
Connecticut Ag. 7, Rhode Island
IState 0.
Middlebury 41, Norwich 0.
SOUTHERN
l Kentucky Univ. 3, Georgia Tech. 3.
Vanderbilt 35, Georgia 7.
Center 17, Auburn 0.
Washington & Lee 13, U. of S. Car-
olina 7.
Roanoke 9, William & ,Mary 7.
Maryland 06, U. of N. Carolina 12
Virginia Military 33. U. of Tennes-

"Robber, "Th.e- In the first quarter a forward 'pass considerably. v~ v
The rooters continued the argu- , by Martineau ailed 30 yards to Eck- Blott's injury came immediatelya
ment with the referee during the j lund, just across the Iowa line. ter the'Wisconsini field goal. Jack kic
remainder of the game confining their In the next period Martineau ran ed off to Harris who returned to I
fight to an angry "panning" of the from the Hawkeye 25 yard line for own 38 yard line and Taft then fa
veteran arbiter. Shouting "robber", another touchdown. Martineau also ed to gain around right end. On t
"thief" and repeatedly accusing him of ! counted in the Gopher's third touch- following play Williams smashed
"throwing the game to Michigan", the down in the third period. Abraham- to the line for two yards and wh
rooters worked themselves into such a son kicked two goals. ;the line of scrimmage was clear
frenzy at the end of the game that Iowa's touchdown came. in the third away, Blott was lying prostrated
they rushed on the field intent on period on a line plunge from Min- the ground. Examination proved ti
mobbing Eckersall. With cries of nesota's three yard line where the his ankle was broken in the same w
"get Eckersall", "get the robber" sev- ball had been placed on a 15 yard as that of Uteritz' and he was carr
eral hundred pushed their way past penalty. off the field and removed to the U;
a squad of remonstrating policemen f versity hospital. He will return wi
and were only checked when the Wis- 1the team tonight.
consin coaching staff, realizing the LLDNEPES TI TO, Pass Over Goal Line Falls
danger to Eckersall, called upon the Michigan had several chances
Badger team, weary from the bitter- nT fT l score later in the game but none
y .fought gam(e, to escort the Chica- them proved fruitful. In the third p
go man:from the field. .Iiod a pass, Vick to Kipke, took t
, Team Saves Referee Iball deep into enemy territory. T
The players formed a cordon about President Livingston Farrand of line plunges failed but on the n
the referee and with the aid of the k Cornell university, has accepted the play Steger gained nine.yards. Kip
police hurried him safely to the field invitation extended by the University then attempted a drop kick but t
i house with the hooting crowd foll- to speak at the Washington's birthday ball went wide of the goal posts s
in . he a ge o he Wi co s n tu the Badgers got t o s i n o
Rents did not abate with this sally, convocation in Hill auditorium, it wa,sg 20 gits ession on t
however, and many loud protestations announced Friday. iod, after a 30 n the same p
against the decision, and threats ag- Dr. Farrand received his A. B. from rnd a completd pass, Vck toM
-anst the victorious team and the re- Princeton university. After studying ion, had taken the ball inside the
feree were voiced as the rooters left 'abroad for a number of years he yard line, a grounded pass over
the field and marched up the street, joined the faculty of Columbia univer- goal line again spoiled Wolver
but no acts of violence were reported. j sity where he remained until 1914. In chances of a touchdown. In the 1
4that year lie accepted the presidency: quarter Michigan recovered a fum
of the University of Colorado remain- in the middle of the field and by mea
ing there until 1919. From 1919 un- of two passes from Vick, one to Ro
til 1921 he was chairman of the cen- well, and one to Steger, the Maize a
tral committee of the Aymerican Red tBlue advanced to the Badger 10 y,
Cross. He became president of Cor- Iline but on the fourth down anot
IUUUiSiu I IVI 7 21 nell in 1921.e apass, Vick to Steger, was groun
He was given an honorary LL. D. and Wisconsin took the ball.
Champaigne, Ill., Nov. 17-(By A. degree from the University of Michi- (Continued on Page Six)
gan in11.______
P.)-Illino-s ran over Mississippi A.i
:and M. today for a 27 to 0 victory in WiIT l
EYTAKSRC RM CurryWil3Ta lk
agame devoid of excitement. "Red" on Dl
Grange, sensational halfback and H. , aeSte
Hall, regular quarterback, saw the
game from the bench while. W allie' -I- dy at"hefc sminarofb
Mellwain and Earl Britton their back I , W Arb": cal , emr n.r of

1.
i.

QUESTIONS ASKED BY
VOCATIONAL COMMITTEE
Students who are experiencing
difficulty in choosing their life
work will be given help by the
S. C. A. Vocation committee. Stu-
dents who care to participate in
the benefits of the committee fill
out the following blanks and mail
the answers to Egbert Isbell,
'26L, 329 Catherine.
1. Have you selected your life

Rice 7, Texas A. M. 6.
Loyola 31, Rose' Poly 0
Univ. of Montana 24, Montana State
Col. 13.
California 9, Washington 0. .
INTER-SECTIONAL
Haskell Indians 14, Marines 14.
Cedar Rapids High 26, Harrisburg
Tech 21.
Scott High 20, Spokane High 10.
Lafayette 45, Univ. of Dayton 0.
Marquette 13, S. Dakota State 0.

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IviliwALLaLL AUI1 J4A14v.L " L #JA J( -York', andt authaor of many trea
field mates played less than a half. Louisville, Ky., Nov. 17-(By A.P.) on the Bible, will"address the c
Illinois used only straight football -Zev, Harry Sinclair's three year old bined congregations of several of
against the Southerners, the only var- i Protestant churches of the'it
rations being a few short forward racing horse, proved 'his worth today, rtsatcurhso h i
s7:30 o'clock tonight in the Methc
passes. Mississippi was unable to do' and his claim to the title of America s church on the subject; "Where I
anything through the Illinois line and greatest horse when he defeated Carl the Bible Come In?"
attempted end runs. They threaten- d sr y Professor Curry is on a years 1
ed the Illinois goal line twice, both ' Weideman's In Memoniam by a nose PoesrCryi naya'
timnes as a result of forward pass at- on the famous Churchill Downs track. of absence from his school du
which time he is endeavoring to r
tacks. Each time they lost the ball In, Memoriam pushed ahead at first, eve college campus in the UI
---- --------------l---------. - _,vrycolgcapsi teU

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