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November 16, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-11-16

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; NO TEMPERA
THlE CHANGE E
VOL. XXXIV. No. 47 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1923 EIGHT PAGES

LEASED WIRE SERVICE
ASSOCIAT D PRESS
MEMBER
WESTERN CONFERENCE
DITORIAL ASSOCIATION
PRICE, FIVE CENTS

JOHNSO'N'EINTERHS
PRESIDENTIAL RACE
WITH REPUBLICANS
ANNOUNCES CANDIDACY FOR G. 0.
P. NOMINATION; CITIES BID
FOR GATHERING
CHICAGO MAY SEE 1923
NATIONAL CONVENTION
San Francisco, Cleveland, Des Moines,
Alsoit Conte t for
Big Meet

Chicago, Nov. 15-(By A.P.)-Sena-
tor Hiram W. Johnson of California
tonight announced his candidacy for
the Republican nomination for Presi-
dent declaring that'"the ensuing con-
test will dtermine whether the Re-
publican party shall be the permanent
instrument of reaction or whether it
shall respond to present day condi-
tions and aspirations".
Wants Preference Primairies
In tossing his hat into the presiden-
tial ring, Senator Johnson declared
for direct presidential preference pri-
maries in all the states, and said the
need today was for a revitalized re-
publican party which should be an in-
strument "neither of static reaction
nor destructive radicalism" and ex-
pressed opposition to the league of
nations "and all its subsidiaries".
Washington, Nov. 15-(By A..)-
Four cities, Chicago, Cleveland, Des
Moines, and San Francisco, formally
entered the lists today for the Repub-
lican national convention of 1924 sub-
mitting invitations to the sub commit-
tee of the national committee.
Denver Not Entered
Denver which had been reported as
'a contender, did not extend an invi-
tation but is not barred from doing
so as the full committee will not meet
until Dec. 11 to make-a final choice
and select a date for the convention,
probably early next June.
Pledges of expenses, non-profiteer-
ing hotel and restaurant prices, and
ample auditorium and other facilities
were made in behalf of all the con-
tendingcites. These and other fac-
tors, political, financial, psychological
geographical and climatic were ar-
gued for two hours before the sub
comit e eieby Iavl i Mulane,
national commnitteeman for Kansas.
Mr. Mulvane announced that the sub
committee wassitting as a fact finding
body to sunmarize .the various of-
fers and present them to the full meet-
ing withou~t recommendation.
LATE IMMIGRANTS WILL
0E ALLOWED TO REMAIN1
New York, Ndv. 15-(By A.P.)-
Three thousand aliens who arrived at
Ellis Island about Nov. 1 after the im-
migration quotas of their respective'
countries were said to have been ex-
hausted will be admitted to this coun-
try unless physical, mental or other
causes complete the deportation, W.
W: Husband, commissioner general of
immigration announcd tonight. A
check of the quotas, he said, reveals
that virtually all could be included
in the- 1923 allotments.
The aliens were admitted tempor-
arily to this country on parole pend-
ing a determina.tion of their status but
the parole ordered later was cancelled.!
Records .of the number of deporta-
tions under the monthly quotas, it was
said had. not been brought up to date
with the result that the leeway in the
yearly quota was in doubt.
State Summons
Ku Klux Dragon
Oklahoma City, Nov. 15 -(By A. P.)
-A subpoena for M. C. Jewtt, Grand
Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan in Okla-
homa, was issued today by the defense
in the impeachment trial of Gov. J. C.
Walton. The subpoena ordered Jew-
ett to appear before the impeachment
court with all state records of the
Klan including the complete list of
Oklahoma members. ,

CHIMES ADHERES TO NEW
POLICY IN SECOAD ISSUE
Garbed in a football cover the No- old man, Fielding H. Yost. The por-
vember number of Chimes, campus trait carries just the suggestion of
opinion monthly, appeared on the the famous Yostian smile which the
campus yesterday morning. A us- sagacious old mentor carries ever with
ual occurence this, but should be ren- him.
dered of special interest because Athletics receive much space in this
Chimes this month, to the best of the issue of Chimes. "That Professional-
knowledge of the staff, is the largest ism Ruling" by Henry Fordyce is es-
college monthly magazine ever pub- pecially timely and carries some so-
lished. Thus does another university; lutions for the professionalism prob-
publication lead the way for all com- lem worth considering. "The Fable
petitors. ,of Edgar" by Martin Codell, '24, 11-
Nor is quality sacrificed to volume. lustrated by many small photographs
,ChImes' first issue of the year was should serve to teach the layman some
good, better than average but its sec- of the inner workings of the gridiron
pnd should establish a standard of ex- sport. "What's Wrong With College
cellence which future issues will do Athletics?" by John Dawson, '24L,
well to live up to. The subject mat- gently chides the University for un-
ter is, as A rule, of high standard and due attention to sports. '
of the right proportion. ,4 Chimes Enterprises
Editorials Interesting Two Chimes enterprises are again
Following the new policy, announc- brought into play in the articles "The
ed with the opening of the school year Woman's League" by Helen Delbridge;
the editorials, have been placed first and "What Lane Hall Proposes" by
,in the magazine. They are on sub- Hall De Weese. '25. "An Appreciation
jects of general nterest to the cam- of Leon Makielski" by Alfred G. Peli-
pus and the subjects are well handl- kan, "A Fraternity Chart of Activi-
ed. Two of them treat of what is ties" by Ronald Halgrim, '25, and
perhaps the foremost of the Chimes "The Teacher and His Freedom" byl
'enterprises, the completion of the Un- Preston Slosson are articles of gen-.
ion swimming pool. oral, interest well worth reading.
As a frontispiece this month Chimes Two short stories, "Paradise Lost"
presents a picture of Michigan's grand by R. V. Halsey, '25, and "My Dad"
' are the only fiction contributions to 1
this issue. "Monkey Glands" a play
is built about a hackneyed subject
6-O PH E R S T O H AV rfesrs Av cton s c ntiue
but is well handled. "Just; Verse-A
Professor's Avocation" is contributed
by Prof. M. C. Weir of the rhetoric de-
NBpartment.B UI

REPORTS fPREDICTMNNH ,[
STRESEMNRULE
WILL NO9T LU VI Y
POLITICAL CIRCLES EXPRESS
FEAR FOR LIFE OF EXIST-
ING CABINET
PARTY SURVEY FAILS
TO. BRIGHT, N OUTLOOK
Chancellor May Refuse to Risk Vote in
Reichstag; Dictatorship
Possible
Berlin, Nov. 15-(By A.P.)-The
Rhineland and the Ruhr and the num-
erous internal and foreign issues in-
terlocked with them, together with. the
immediate conomic and political fu-
ture of Germany noW constitute the
outstanding problems confronting the
government of Chancellor Stresemann.
Although the reichstag at present is
not in session and Berlin still is with-
out ts regular compliment of news-
papers, political circles predict that
the Stresemann cabinet will not be
able to survive the parliamentary at--
tacks awaiting it from the German
nationalists and the powerful social-
ist partes.
The casual survey of the party line-
ups suggest that if chancellor Strese-
mann attempts a vote of confidence
when the reichstag convenes he will
meet with defeat, as the only tang-
ible support vouchsafed in the pres-
ent situation comes from the clericals!
and democrats and the wholly disun-
ited peoples party.
tunder these conditions it is seen
to be a strong probability that the
chancellor will refuse to go before the
reichstag with his government and
will anticipate defeat by resigning or
forcing a dissolution of the reichstag
and continuing in office at the head
of a non-parliamentary government1
comprising a semi-dictatorship.
TEH ISSUE
APPEARS TP SMhaRfNN

BORAN SAYS TAX
REDUCTION MUST
BE MADE AT ONCE
GIVES FIRST BROADSIDE TALK
SINCE INTRODUCTION OF
MELLON'S POLICY
PREDICTS INCREASE IN
PUBLIC EXPENDITURES
Million More Persons Affected; De-
clares Payers Will "Turn on
Torturer"
Washitngton, Nov. 15 - Seven
and a half million persons and
corporations are affected by the
tax revision proposed by Secre-
tary of the Treasury Mellon.
This is an Increase of about
one million over the returns for
1921, which treasury experts now
say cannot be taken as a normal
I year and that 1922 will show a
return to the seven and a half
million mark.
Washington, Nov. 15.-(By A. P.)-
The first boardside of talk on the tax-
ation policy of republican organiza-
tion leaders in congress was made to-
night by Senator Borah, republican,,
Idaho, who declared that reduction of
the present tax burden was not'only
an economic but a moral necessity.
If the present plan for delaying;
such a reduction is carried out, he
said in a. formal statement, it may.
prove a "hazardous enterprise" forj
congress to face its constituency next
year at the polls. For the tax payer,
he asserted, is showing a strong in-
clination "to turn upon his torturer."
Despite these signs of the times,
however, the Senator added, it is cer-
tain that unless those favoring reduc-
tion go to work on an affirmative pro-
grain, the next session will see taxes
and public expenditures increased in-
stead of curtailed.
Crowd, Giving I Big
Sendoff To Team,
Hushed By Trainerf

Alabama Sends
Young War Vet
To Washington

OFOVERSTEPPING
COURT REARS CASES OF ALLEGED
BRIBERY; WITNESES TESTIFY
FOR PLAINTIFF
CLAIM SIGLER RECEIVED
THOUSANDS FROM DUPES
Clerk Identifies Certified Copy Oi
Contract Giving Money
For Freedom
Oklahoma City, Okla., Nov. 15.-(By
A. P.)-The impeachment trial of
Gov. J. C. Walton passed slowly

ate:?::.:::":.; irvS.v.'.".

through the opening today of the
prosecution's efforts to substantiate
the charge that the executive abused
his pardon and parole powers.
" 1 YFrequently interrupted by argument
of counsel during which witnesses
were on the stand for long interyals
without being questioned and by fre-
Rep.-Elect Joseph Lister hill quent questions from members of the
Joseph Lister Hill, war veteran and courts, little progress was made by
just past 30 years of age, will repre- presenting the purported account of
sent the second congressional district Governor Walton's clemency record.
of Alabama in the national house when Much of the day was devoted to
congress convenes next month. Hill's bringing out the details of an alleged
election was uncontested. He is a agreement between Guy Sigler, state
Democrat. representative from Carter county
-- and Pears Hicks of Beckham, Okla.,
9 who was pardoned after being con-
victed of a bogus check charge
ham county, identified a certified copy
of a contract by which Sigler was.to
PUZZLES receive $2,500, the appeal fund which
Hicks had made, in return for obtain-
ing a pardon within 60 days. The~wit-
Ambassadors Can Not Ag'ree After ness also testified that he paid the
Frederick William Arrives! money to Sigler's agent, H. t. Diskins,
rdInk emay AJune 28.
In Germany Aldrich Blake, former executive
counsellor, testified that Govei'nor
MEMBERS TO SEED ORDERS Walton had information that Sigler
FROM THEIR GOVERNMENTS would get $1,000 for obtaining the par-
don for Hicks.
Paris, Nov. 15-(By A.P.)-The al- The prosectution also introduced
lied council of 'ambassadors which testimony bearing on the case of H.
readily reached an agreement to send P. Wheeler, who was' convicted of pos-
a warning to Berlin respecting the sessing liquor in Custer county and
ex-crown prince before he returned to who presented a pardon to the court
G-rav nm

Construction of $750,000 Edifce
Commence Next Spring; Will
Seat 50,000

to!

STRUCTURE TO BE DESIGNED
IN SINGLE DECK "U" SHAPE
{ Minneapolis, Nov. 15--(By A.P."-
Final plans for the new $750,000
stadium at the University of Minne-
sota, construction of which will begin
next spring, were announced by Pro-.
fessor Frederick Mann, Minneapolis,
chief architect in an article published!
today in the current issue of the Alum-
ni -weekly.
The stadium will be a single deck
.U shaped structure, with an opening
at one end to allow erecton of ad-
ditional seats to accommodate 7,000
'persons. The normal seating capacity
of the stadium stand will be about
50,000 according to Mr. Mann.
ALUMNI WILL MAINTAIN
R HEGISTRATION BUP R .E1AU
Officials of the alumni association
will be present tomorrow at the reg-
istration bureau at the Park Hotel atl
Madison for alumni who attend the
Michigan-Wisconsin game. Mason P.
Rumney, '07E, president of the asso-
ciation, Wilfred B. Shaw, '04, execu-
tive secretary, and Hawley Tapping,
field secretary, will be at the booth.
Mr. Shaw and Mr. Rumney will
speak this noon before a luncheon
meeting of the' Chicago alumni and;
tonight at a smoker in Milwaukee held!
for all alumni who are staying in that#
city. Mr. Tapping will speak at Rock-
ford, Ill., this noon and may be pres-
ent at the smoker in Milwaukee to-
night.
WILL SPEAK HERE SON~
Students and faculty, espech) y l
those interested in journalism, are to!
be given an opportunity to hear Johnk
Willis Abbott, '84L, managing editor.
! of The Christian Science Monitor,
when he talks here Dec. 8 under the
auspices of the annual convention of'
the Western Conference Editorial as-
sociation.
General ticket sale for the luncheon
at the Union at which he will give the
address on this date will open soon.
Delegates from Big Ten schools who
will be here for the convention will
attend the luncheon as a part of the
regular program which has been ar-
ranged for them.
Symphony Concert
Delayed One Week
On account of the illness of Sam-
uel P. Lockwood of the School of Mu-

IN 'ENSIAN DRIVE'
Three Pay Campaign Results In Total
.Of 2627 SubscriptIons; Beats
Previous Recordls
PERSONS MAY STILL SIGN
FOR YEARBOOKS AT OFFICE,
With a grand total of 2627 sub-
scriptions obtained, the three-day
drive for the 1924 Michiganensian
closed last night. The number', of
subscriptions is larger than that of
the two drives last year combined. 1
Returns are not as yet complete
from. the fraternities,, sororities and
dormitories. To date approximately
550 subscriptions have been receivedI
from these sources.
The results of the drive show, ac-
cording to Gifford. Upjohn, '25, sales
manager for the 'Ensians, that taking
into consideration the adverse weath-
er conditions under which the cam-
paign has been conducted, the new
system inaugurated this year has metI
with the approval of the campus. Un-
der the new plan it is not necessary1
to pay for the subscription at the time
of signing the pledge card. A table
was placed in the vestibule of the
library at which those wishing to pay
immediately could do so. Approxi-
mately 200 payed after signing for
the subscription.
Anyone who did not sign for an
'Ensian during the drive but wishes
to. subscribe for one may do so by
coming to the 'Ensian office in the1
Press building. It has not as yet
been decided whether or not a springj
subscription campaign will be con-.
dudted.
UNION TO GET

Technic, official publica
alumni and undergraduate
leges of engineering anda
will appear on the campu
ing. A campus sale camp
inaugurated with this, th
of the year.
The magazine this mon
a new makeup and will b
interest to all' the campu
to members of the staff.
Photos of various engi
sects in Alaska will co
frontispiece. Colonel Jan
Steese has contributed the
"The Alaska Railroad". O
will be "The New Steel
Australia" by Prof. W. H
the geology department,"
Heat Interchange Apparat
Fry and "The Military E
Maj. W. T. Carpenter.I
Moore of the University
will contribute "The Fati
als" and Prof. W. S. Fra
Massachusetts Institutec
ogy "Should Technical E
Ameliorated?"
In the architecture sec
found "On Sketching" by
Cleland, '24A and numero
icles. Alumni Notes willc
magazine.

S "° When after many moments of in- ermany, seems unaoie to reach an when sentence was passed upon hm.
accord as to action now that Frederick
ation of the tense excitement the Michigan "Cen- 'William has arrived, in the Father-,
s of the col- tral train swung around the bend and land. The council adjourned until
architecture, steamed into the Ann Arbor station Saturday morning after a discussion [HilE
s this morn- { last night to take the team "on to today with the understanding that then
aign will be Madison" thre were more than 500 members would seek instructions from
Le first issue DES. GATES TOICOMMISSIO
I students cheering, whistling and their governments in the interim.
shouting a sendoff to the unconquered Great Britain, which took the initi-
th will have Michigan eleven. ative in notifying the German govern , ashington, Nov. 15.-(By A. P.)-
e of general 1 In the meantime the two cars in ment that the return of the. Prince The United States and two other gov-
s, according which the team were sleeping were would be regarded as a grave menace,; ernments today communicated to the
neering pro-being coupled to the train, having now raises objection to action because Pan American union the names of
nstrtut the- previously stood on the station sid- of judicial difficulties. It was argued their representatives on the interna-
nstitute theGordon ing. The noisy demonstraton of the during today's session that the allies tional commission of jurists in accord-
s r crowd soon ought forth on of the were no more justified in asking the ance with action taken by the Pan
)ther articles r football trainers, who, according to expulsion of the Hohenzollern heir American conference at San Diega
Industry of reports, asked the assembled rooters than heirs to other thrones in the last April.
Indutryof rpors, skedtheasseble rotersreih1.The appointments. announced are:
'. Hobbs of to keep quiet so that the team might reichs.For Guatamala, L. Don Antona, Ba-
'An Efficient not be disturbed.ItresanamalatoL.DonJAnto, Da-
byL .1is WebwasthFlangef uc tres and Doctor Don Jose Natos.;. for
us by L. H.! This move was the cause of much W And Flan ePanama, Dr. Busebio A. Morales and
ngineer" by astonishment and disappointment on TuDr. Horatio F. Alfaro; for the United
Prof. H. F. the part of the students, many of Take In Fourteen States, Dr. James R. Scott, of this city,
r of Illinois whom departed immediately. Soon and Prof. Jesse S Reeves, of the Uni-
igue of Met- the whole throng, with the exception F and rof JessegS.
cnklin of theI of a handful had left in silence. These Fourteen members of the senior en'I versity of Michigan.
of Technol- few, hownever, finally got together and gineering class were initiated . last The' commission;.Iwhich is to prepare
T n- ,dnight into Web and Flangeseniorlon--a code of private and public interna-
ducation Be gave the team the last cheer it heard nrghy ito WebndFlange, seniot h tional laws and frame rules of guid-
before it left to enter the enemies! ten- orary civil engineering society. The
Aion will be fritory. men taken in were James Dietle, Carl ance' for 'tip American states in legal
ty Eugene T. ry Dust, Donald Zinn, Riley Sipe, C. A proceedings between them, will meet
y EueneT. ur h rZn Rley ipe A.In Rio Do. Janeiro in 1:925.
us short art SOPHS PICK HONOR Miller, Arthur Cloud, . J. Corsette,
complete the E. J. Talaska, W, A. McClenahen, L
REPRESENTATIVE S. McClenahen, D. Elie, Harold Con- Hundreds TryFor
roy, J. W. Humphreys, H. F. Schiefer.
Following the initiation held in the orl e ce
E, F. Cardwell, '26E, was chosen the engineering arch. the men were ten-
iI i Sophomore class representative on the dered a banquet in Willett's cafe. Prof. . New York, Nov. 15-(By A.P.)-Per-
Enginering Honor committee for the H. E. Riggs, head of the civil engineer-i sons of 22 countries, men and women
I coming two years at a class meeting ing department, the first speaker, of all degrees, believe they know how
M l'HINES 1 Iheld yesterday in Room 348 Engineer- talked on "Some Present Day Engin- # to hold the world in peace, it was dis-
ing building. Announcements for the eering Problems". Other speakers closed tonight when the American
By A. P.)-- year were made by the presidIent,' H. were Prof. Clarence T. Johnston, head peace award announced the close of
eleven f roi G. Goebel. of the department of surveying and the contest for the $100,000 prize of-
sas, boasting J. P. Vose, chairman of the athlet- geodesy, Prof. H. Bouchard from the fered by Edward W. Bok. Those who
of the sea- !i committee, also outlined his pro-' same department, G. L. Alt, instructor, submitted )plans before the contest
such eastern gram and stated that the bowling team in . the civil engineering department, closed at midnight ran into many hun-
Carlisle InI expenses will be paid by the class. B. F. Hausman, '24E and E. J. Tal- dreds.
n New Yorki Call for tryouts will probably be is- aska, '24E, Paul A. Smith, '24E, acted Members of the policy committee es-
tel zagainst sued the first of next week. as toastmaster. timated that at least one fourth of
no elv athe entrants were women, as that
gday. Theatre "number was indicated in the request
point, have IzchZgan Ke ertory h'for the contest conditions issued short-
oints and ex- r e ly after' the prize was announced.
tk before thc- An ouncesIeeN ew.d ays The contestants and the cities and
vi, 205 pound counties willnot be known until an
-a w ard 'boa h n a b od-

GA ME RESUL TS) I FOOTBALL
Football results of the Michgan-'
Wisconsin game and of other big foot- READY TO PLAY
ball games throughout the country
will be given out tomorrow at the--
Union. Special service has been a'r- New York, Nov. 15.-(
ranged by the Union with which all The red' skin footballe
results will be given out free of ;Raskall Institute of Kans
charge the high scoring record
The play by play account of the son and ambition to win
Michigan Wisconsin game will be giv-' favor as that held by the
en in the reading room of the Union. dian'teams, has arrived
A miniature football field has been for its first eastern ehibi
built upon which the play will be re- the srng sticMa
produced. Special arrangements with The Indians, althougr
the telegraph company has made a Minnesota but a single
wire for this available. Minnes ota u fs37glp
Between quarters scores of the oth- rolled up a total of 376
er big games will be announced in the season ends. In John Le'
tap room, in the billiard room, at the fullback and captain,
speqial matinee dance the Union is triple threat star of abi
giving, and in the lower reading room. that of Jim Thorpe. L
exhibition of passing an
BROWN A DDRESSES Yankee stadium today, w
anything of its kind yet
REPUBLICAN CLUB + His forward passes were
distances of 60 to 70 ya
Prof. E. S. Brown, of the Political punts travelled 60 to 65y
Science department, was the speaker
before the Republican club luncheon Consul To Sp
at noon yesterday in the Union. His ,

t
t
t-
':
- .

WOMEN

I

PROOF!

1

Michigan men have a world-
wide reputation for being able
to subdue the fairer sex. If per-
chance one of the afore men-
tioned has broken through and a
fraternity pin is missing, Jim-

they claim a
iLity rivaling I Three
evi gave an ; present
d kicking at meeting,
hich excelled of -thel
shown here. "March
accurate for will be1
ards and his Pedersdo
yards. translate
ruary, ai
IGeorge]E
,eak March.
Tnv Cs h l All th

plays to be given during the
4,eason w'ere decided at a
held last night, of patronsi
Michigan Repertory theatre.
Hares" by Harry Wagstaff
presented in January, "Anne
otter", by Wiers-Jenssen,
ed by John Grubble in Feb-
and "Man and Superman" by
Bernard Shaw will be given in
ree plays will be under the

was founded with the purpose of
bringing a better class of plays to
Ann Arbor and to Michigan, and was
organized by' Prof. Oscar J. Campbell
of the English department. The com-
munity theater idea represents a new
movement being started in various
parts of the country.
Under the ticket distribution decid-
ed upon, the theatre tickets will be
sold upon a membership plan only.]

awuu u een m ize.
Club To Gather
At -SocialTonight
Cosmopolitan club will meet at 7:30
o'clock tonight at Tne hall to attend
a social and an entertainment. $ever-
al musical numbers have been ar-
ranged, including duets, and a violin
solo by Norman Johnson, '25. In ad-

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