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November 15, 1923 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

(IGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1

} .

Crown Prince "Overjoyed" At
Return To Ancestral Estate

GRID GRAPH ToOBE
ORM0BYSTUDETS
Charles Livingsto, 25, Heads Coi-
iittee to Operate Apparatus
Saturdiay
SPECLAL WItE CONNECTION
FROM FIELD AlANE IFOR
Arrangements for the grid-graph
showing of the Wisconsin-Michigan
game at 2:15 o'clock Saturday will be
handled completely by student com-
mittees under the direction of Charles
Livingston, '25, with the supervision
of John Bradfield, '18, business man-
ager of the Alumnus, who is in charge
of the board for the Alumni associa-
tion.
This plan is the result of the deci-
sion of the Alumni association,
through its Board of Directors, to give
25 per cent of the profits of the graph
to the Varsity band for out-of-town
trips starting next year. In about
three years 50 per cent will be do-
nated.
Cheerleaders Picked
This is being done in return for
student aid in the showing of the
graph. Sphinx, Triangles, and other
groups will sell tickets on the campus,
while operation of the board and the
erection of it as well as, selling and
taking tickets will be taken care of by
the student committee.
Lyman Savage, '25 who aided Prof.
E. B. Potter of Ohio State University,
inventor of the board in runningit at
the Iowa game, Nov. 3, will control
the lights on the stage. Three cheer-
leaders, picked from those who do not
go to the game, will lead yells, and
the R. O. T. C. band has been offered
by Wilfred Wilson, director, to furnish
music, in place of the Varsity.
Time for starting the performance
has been changed, due to the confu-
sion that resulted at the Iowa game.
Preliminary reports will not begin un-
til nearly game time, 3 o'clock, but
the doors of the auditorium will be
opened at 2:15.
Tickets on Sale
A special telephone connection from
the field direct to the auditorium will
be established, in order to eliminate
the necessity of sending the returns
to the Western Union office and phon-
ing them to Hill auditorium. A tele-
graph wire will be used to suplement
the phone, however.
Hawley Tapping, '16L, field secre-
tary of the association, who will be at
Madison in connection with the Alum-
pi association's registration bureau
for alumni there on Saturday, will
have charge of th arrangements for
the fire from there.
Tickets for the graph are now on
sale at the Union, Graham's, Wahr's,
and Huston's. They will be sold on
the campus tomorrow, at a table in
front of the library. Some will also
be sent to the various fraternities and
soroities tomorrow and Saturday. All
expecting to attend are asked to pur-
chase tickets before going to the aud-
itorium as facilities are not on hand
there to sell to a large crowd.
Members of the reserve, and fresh-
man football squads who do not go to
Madison will be guests of the Alumni
association Saturday, as will all nem-
bars of the Athletic department.

Doctor To Speak bicago, where he will address a Inge
convention.
Ot Work IInlda
Of Work I India tieiiaSociety Offer" Scholrsips
Dr. G. G. Crozier, far 21 years active The American Chemical society is
medical missionary in India, will ad- offering prizes to high school students
dress the Washtenaw county medical throughout the country for the six
bassociation at a 'banquet in the Union i best eisays on certain chemical sub-
at 6:30 o'clock tonight. He will read100t Besides the six scholarships,
a paper entitled, "Medical Work in;otherawards will be made.
Ind'a."
Dr. Crozier is in Ann Arbor for1 It's true efficiency to use Daily
this week only, going from here to utassifieds.-Adv.
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IYou eoyBo Me
Y be
= Itis never too late to begin. Start now
while Michigan is beginning another
championship season.
in~J2DLLS1UID3 1905
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View of the castle of Oels, where the former crown prince now resides, and
inset of Fr derick Wilhelm.
Prince Frederick William is reported as being "overjoyed" at his re-
turn to Germany after his long exile in Holland. He spent yesterday morn-
ing wandering about the garden of the estate pictured above, accompanied
by his wife, Princess Cecilie.
German republ'c leaders and allied nations in Europe are watching his
actions closely. Holland consented to his departure over the protest of
France and other nations.
News From Ofher Colleges

Chk'ago -Walking lessons are to be
'dded to the University curriculum.
the professor in charge of zhe course
leclares that more than 40 per cent of
the students do, not know the way to
distribute the weight of h° body.
*lasses in the art of walking gill be
;iven three hours credit.
0. S. U.- -Final figures on the uni-
'ersity enrollment have been fs ted
)y the registrar. The student b-dy
now numbers close to 10,000 students.
this is an increase of more than 800 i
fver last year .
Yale-Al Jolson, the world famcus{
.omedian, has changed his matinee
ierformance from Saturday afternoon
.o Friday afternoon in order Jhat he!
nay attend the Yale-Princeton game.
He says that his slogan is "when the
show business interferes with football,
rive up business.
Illinois-One hundred and six re-
)orters have survived the seven weeks
est of the Daily Illini. Of this num-
ber 37 are men and 69 are women.
A host of students tried out.
Wisconsin-Three women studentsI
were exonerated from all blame 'n
connection with the auto accident in
Chicago Heights that resulted in ther
lath'of two men. The students were
returning from the Illinois game. I
Kansas-A high school newspaper
conference is scheduled for l+ riday and
Saturday. More than 300 high school'
students are expected to attend.
XIssouri-One of the largest crowds
in the history.of the University wit-
nessed the recent homecoming parade.
Extra police were needed to handle
the crowd.I
Texas-A campus drive here for the

purpose of raising funds in order to
send the band to Waco was success-
ful. More than $500 was raised.
NOVEL STUNT TO AWAKEN TEAMI
TRIED BY PURDUE EXPONENT
(Cont.nued from Page Six)
Ifootball heads. The Exponent, how-
ever, bee6mes none the less hearty a
supporter of the Boilermaker eleven
than it was'befbre."
In explaining later its position re-
garding the attempt to "'startle re-
sults from some channel" the paper
says, that "if those results come in
the awakening of the team to a fight-
ing determination to win the next
two games, then it will have accomp-
lished its purpose."

at tke
PACKARD
KENNEDY' BEST ORCHESTRA
I ith PHIL DIAMOND AT THE PIANO
Ann Arbor's Finest Music
8-10 P. N.: 75 cents
Work in which your
4 o colg career counts
Choose a life-work in which all you have
learned will count'- where you will continue to
learn through association with men of high
calibre-where your education will be an aid in
meetig men.
Enter the insurance profession. Insurance-
Fire, Marine and Casualty - places you at once
in touch with big business men. Not only will all
you'have learned be an asset but you will be daily
increasing your education along economic and
industrial lines. The Insurance business' makes big
men. Choose Insurance as your life-work.
The Insurance Company of North America is
a national, historical institution -founded in
1792--with over a century and a quarter of well
earned prestige. Conservative policies and de-
pendable service have been responsible for the
growth and for the constructive activities of the
Company in the development of the entire
insurance profession.
Insurance Company of
North America
PHILADELPHIA
and the
Indemnity Insurance Company of North America
write practically every form of insurance except life.

1 1I I 1111ll I I 111 1i 111 lI 1E11i ll l lil lilllilliflllillltlll llillillllllll l11l,
Sunday, November 25, 4:15 P. M. Faculty Concert Series
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Samuel P. LOCKWOOD, Conductor be
GRACE JOHNSON ORA
KONOLD LARTHARD
N d soprano Violoncellist
No Admission Charg--Children under Twelve Years of age not ad-
mltted unless they first obtain ticket at the School of Music
' Thursday, November 22, 8 P. M. Choral Union Series
COSJ FAN TUTTE OPERA CO.
Direction WILLIAM WADE HJNSHIAW
HEADED BY
SOLOISTS IRENE WILLIAMS
Stage Seeer y and Beautiful Costumes
A Few Tickets for Ilidlvidual Concerts Available.
Monday, December 4, 8 P- M. Extra Concert Series E
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCH ESTRA
VICTOR Richard
KOLAR CROOKS
Conducting Tenor
Course Tickets--$2,00, $3.00, $4.00, $5.00
Single Concerts-$.50, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00
Sunday, December 9, 4:14 P. M. *Faculty Concert Series
CONCERT BY FACULTY
of the UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC
No Admission Charge-Children under Twelve Years of age not ad-
mitted unless they first obtain ticket at the School of'Music
j= Wednesday, December 12, 8'P. M. Choral Union Series i
EFFREt RENOWNED £
ZIMBALIST VIOLINIST
A Few Tickets for Individual Concerts Available.
For information or tickets call at the University School of a
Music, CHARLES A. SINK, Secretary
tI liiillllul ln n llll l lllunnanliillllIllltflllnllillnllllH lllil1111 1 1111itlg;

lhoe 2;5
IRVING WA IIIMIO TS, P. S. C.
CHIROPODIST'
and OTlIOPODIST
707 N. University

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