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September 28, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-09-28

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THE WEATHER,
CLOUDY; PROBABLY
SHOWERS

Y t

s

~aitg

ASSOCIATED PRESS
LEASED WIRE SERVICE
MEMBER
WESTERN CONFERENCE
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATION

VOL. XXXIV. No. 5

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 28, 1923

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CENTS

BRITISH POLITICS
STIR RED THROUGH
JANNADECISON
MARQUIS OF CREWE INSTRUCTED
AT FIRST TO OPPOSE
AWARD
GREECE CULBABILITY
ALLEGED NOT PROVED

Governor Enlists
Aid Of Machine
Guns In Klan War

Wonderment Is Expressed
Court Will Accept
Action

That I

London, Sept. 27.-(By A. P.)-Sur-
prise and regret arose in British po-
litical quarters over the decision of
the allied ambassadors conference to
award tIaly the 50,000,000 lires de-
posited by Greece and a guarantee for
Indemnities in the, case growing out
of the massacre of the Italian official
mission near Janina.
It is understood that the Marquis of'
Crewe, British member of the am-
bassador's conference, was at first in-
structed to oppose this award on the
grounds that Greece culpability in the,
affair had not been proved. The Brit-
ish government, however, it is asserted
realizing that it would be the minor-
ity of one against Italy, later decided
for reasons of "diplomacy and expedi-
ence" to modify its attitude.
Political observers are now wonder-
ing whether the permanent court of
International justice to which the in-
demnity question was to be entrusted
will accept the action of the ambassa-
dors.
It is believed the members of the
court may have their own views con-
cerning the merits of the case and that
they have it within their power to
refuse to endorse Greece's check if
they are unconvinced of the justice of
the ambassadors' decision or believe
their own authority is being usurped.
Peheran, China, Sept. 27.-(By A. P.)
-Severe earthquake shocks again
have been felt at Kerman, where much
damage has been done. Tremors also
have been experienced at Bujuurdi,
Raffenjan, Bas and ,Anar. It is re-
ported that smoke is issuing from a
mountain near Bujnurd.
WHEAT DELEGATES HOLD
MET W
MEET WITHUUULIDUUL

av. J. C. Walton
In his war on the Ku Kiuxers in
Oklahoma, Gov. J. C. Walton has call-
ed out the militia and machine gun-
ners to hold all strategic points in Ok-
lahoma City. The Ku Kluxers retali-
ated by illuminating crosses on sever-
al of- Oklahoma City's buildings.
LEGSLATORS TAKE
INJUNCTION ACTION,

Proceedings Started Against
Markham and Militia
Oklahoma

Adj. Gen.
in

Lay out Case of Low Prices;
Legislation for U. S.
Grain Review

Ask

Washington, Sept. 27.-(By A. P.)-
The wheat growing interest of the
central Northwest, suffering from low
prices for their grain laid their case
directly before President Coolidge and
other adimnistration officilals today
with a request that Congress be called
in special session to adopt legislation
to review the U. S. grain, proposition.
The president together with Sec.
Wallace and Ho'over and Manuagingj
Director Meyer of the War Finance re-
ceived. the proposal as presented by a,
delegation of a dozen bankers and
harmers of Minneapolis central re-
serve district but made no promise
Members of the delegation said Mr.
Coolidge showed a deep interest in re-
gard to grain cooperation and they
left the White House after an hour's
conference with. the reception given
their views.
graduate's Book Well Commended
Harry Rickel, a graduate of the law
school and a resident of Mt. Clemens,
is the author of a book, "The Wisdom
of Balzac. }G. P. Putnam's Sons is
publishing the work.
Critics have shown little hesitation
in commending the book. It is re-
portcd that Mr. Rickel has spent six
years going through the entire works
of Balzac and extracted the high lights
of the philosophy of the French au-
thor for his work. Michael Monahan
has an introduction to the work.
FAIR AND WARMER
The weatherman has predicted
fair and warmer weather for the
last few. days. The personal
touch of Jimmie carries with it a
certain warmth of feeling which
is imparted into our column.
However you will find that the

SEEK TO RESTRAIN MILITARY
INTERFERENCE WITH SESSION
Oklahoma City, Sept. 27.-(By A. P.)
-Injunction proceedings to restrain
Adj. Gen. D. Ii. Markham and all mem-
bers of the Oklahoma national guard
from interfering with the special ses-
sion of the lower house of the state!
legislature were filed late today in the
state district court here.
The petition prayed the court to
grant a temporary injunction pending
a final hearing to prevent D. H. Mark-
ham or his successor and each officer
and enlisted man under his command
and their successors, from interfering
with the meeting of the members of
the House of Representatives and to
prevent the militia "from dispersing I
them when assembled." 1
CHINESE STUJDENTS CLUB
SPONSORS__CLEBRATION'
Cinese students are planning to cel-
ebrate their nation's Independence
Day, October 10, with a banquet and
public entertainment, under the direc-
tion of the Chinese Students' club.
This will probably be held in the
Methodist church and Wesley Hall.
The principal speaker of the eve-
ning will pirobably be President Mar-
ion L. Burton, who will talk either at
the banquet or during the evening.
Another speaker will be either a local
or out-of-town Chinese student who4
will give the history of the republic
from its foundation.
During the evening's entertainment
there is planned a one-act play, giv-
en in Chinese costume but in English
tongue, by the members of the club.
Other acts illustrating Chinese cus--
toms will also be on the program. The
entertainment will be free and open
to the general public. Prominent pro-
fessors and others interested in China
will be invited by the club to attend
the banquet, which is for the mem-
bers alone.
DEANS SEND SYMPATHY
TO WESTERN UNIVERSITY
Deans of the various colleges and
schools of the University in their
meeting Wednesday decided to ex-
press their sympathy to the Univer-
sity of California which recently suf-
fered heavy losses by fire.
It also was decided to send a rep-
resentative from the \University to
the inauguration of President W. W.
Campbell of that university. President
Campbell is a graduate of the Univer-.
sity.1
The deans also planned to co-oper-
ate with the Schoolmasters' club in
securing speakers for a general con-

PRESSMEN STRIKE
ENDS INNEW YORK
President of International Union
Announces Reinstatement
of Revolters
1EN OF OTHER CITIES Al)
IN PUTTING OUT PAPERS
New York, Sept. 27.-(By A. P.)-
New York's press strike which norm-
ally ended toay with the appearance
for the first time in nine days of
morning and evening newspapers and
individual sheets will be, it was indi-
cated, definitely concluded tomorrow
night when the strikers cast their
votes for peace.
Four questions will be voted upon
chief among them approval of the In-
ternational Union's contract with the
repudiation of the outlawed local 25
which clled the strike. The agenti
of a new local also is proposed. e-
instatement of strikers will follow,
President George L. Berry, of the In-
ternational, announced.
Meanwhile additional men from ou
of town manned the presses which to-
day gave New York its news in vir-
tually normal form. Editor al pages
reappeared and advertising space in-~
creased.
SARAZEN DEFEAS
'LONG JIM' BARNIES1
Gene Wins on Thirty-sixth hole in
1)ranmatic Fin i, TBarnes
Faltering
CRUICKSHANK, McLEOD AND
HAGEN REACH SEMI-FINALS
Pelham Manor, N. Y,, Sept. 27.-(By
A. P.)-Gene Sarazen, the New York
youth who turned the golfing world on
its head in 1922 with his amazing
game, stepped to the fore today in the
pro-association championship and
won his way to the semi-finals over,
"Long Jim."
Sarazen who won the professional
and the open championship last year
tomorrow will meet Wee Bobby
Cruickshank, of West Field, N. J., who1
triumphed today in an extra hole
match with William MacFarland, of
Tuckahoe. Cruickshank won at the
39th. In the other half of the semi-
finals, Walter Ilagen, victor over
Frank McLeod, of Washington, 5 up
and 4, will play "Dapper George" Mc-
Lean of the Grassy Sprain Club,
Bronxville, hose uncanny putting el-
iminated Joe Kirkwood, the Austra-
lian, 5 and 4.
"Long Jim" was playing his home
course on which he knows every hole I
and every green, the fairways and the
traps. Yet Sarazen took the lead on
the very first hole and was never
down.,
GRADUTES WIN HONOR
IN OAR EXAMIINTIONS i
Lansing, Mich., Sept. 27.-(By A,
P.)-The University of Michigan law
school carried off the honors in the
recent state bar examinations, accord-
ing to a study of the results. Of the
39 university graduates who took the
examinations, 34 passed, or an aver-
age of 87 per cent. In addition, Ed-
win D. Dickinson, of Ann Arbor, pass-
ed all his subjects for the only per
fect score.

The Detroit College of Law stoodt
second with an average o 55 per
cent. 50 of its graduates passing out
of 89. The University of Detroit was
third with 36 per cent. Forty of its
63 candidates failed.
Five of the seven women taking the
examinations passed. As a further
honor to her sex, Catherine E. McIn-
tosh,toftthe University of Detroit, was
one of the, four candidIates to pass all
subjects but one. The other thtree
were Benjamin F. Smith, of the Uni-
vesity of Michigan; Donald J. Mec
Gaffey, of the University of Detroit,
and Earl L. Shimer, of the Detroit Col-
lege of Law.
This was the secoid class under the
new system of conducting the examin-
ations, according to Jay Mertz, clerk
of the State Supreme Court, and the
results this year were approximately
the same as a year ago. This year
88 out of 206 passed and a year ago
98 out of 234.
Freeman Seures Rare Violins
London, Sept. 27.-(By A. P.)--C. J.
Freeman has purchased for Rudolph

Drama Company
G e ts Snpport
Of University
"Michigan is the first university in
the country that has backed any pro-
fessional dranr t'e company--even tac-
itly," said Frederic 1\civonnell, direc-
tor of the Miehigan Repetory theater.
yesterday. "If the venture proves suc-
cuessful, the University will probably
take more official hold of it, and others
may eventually follow her lead.
"The others have sent sudent pro-
ductions on short tours, of course;
Michigan has done that too. But
strangely enough ,although the state
universities have established agricul-
tural stations to take care of inquisi-
tive farmers, and sent professors out
to the outlying districts to lecture
they have never considered it worth
(Continued on Page Two)
GIVESORDE THA
LEADER STATES TENSE ATITUDE
TO BE START OF RIAL
TROUBLE
GERMANY EXPECTED TO
MAKE NEW PROPOSALS
French Retain all iuhr Orders Unth
Situation Shall
Clear Up
Berlin, Sept. 27.--(Ty A. P.)-Chan-
cellor Stresemann this evening notified
the entente ambassadors of the Ger-
man government's decision to cease
passive resistance in the Ruhr and
Rhineland.
Dusseldorf, Sct. 27.-(By A. P.)-
A Berlin dispatch received here an-
nounces that the German government
has issued orders to the officials in
the Ruhr to resume work and cease
passive resistance.
Berlin, Sept. 26--(By A. P.)-Ger-
many's troubles are just about to com-
mence and the time to speak of "capit-
ulation' has not yet exactly arrived,
for the state of the Ruhr and Rhine-
land is intimately interlocked with the
impending resumption of the repara-
tions lproblem.
This is the gist of a candid statement
by a government leader to a private
audience of Berlin editors who were
frankly told that the government con-
templated the immediate future wit
profound skepticism, if not pessimsnsm
"Our troubles are only just begin-
ning," he continued, "as we have yet
to learn the intense attitude toward
our abandonment of passive resistance
and the other occupying powers are
sincerely desirous of cooperating with
us in the complex task of restoring
order."
The question of whether the admn-
istration of the German railways is to
revert exclusively to German nationals
and whether the evicted officials will
be reinstated constituted only one of
the points on which the government is
not yet in a positon to express any
opinions:
Paris, Sept. 27.--(By A. P.)-Al
orders and regulations issued by the
allied authorities in the Ruhr will be
retained -it was announced in official
circles tonight until the situation in
Germany clears and it becomes known
to just what extent the passive resist-
ance has ceased in respondie to Presi-
ldent Ebert's proclamation.
Today's dispatches from Berlin gave
no basis for any conclusion as to

which way events m1ay turn. The I
allies card only continue to sit and
watch.
FoIrmer Chancellor Guno's repara-
tions offers are regarded by the allies
as having been superceded by the later!
developments, and the Germans will
e srected to make entirely new pro-
los~als. If they decide to (d0 s0 thenl
the allies are willing to turn the rep-
and consider the whole question anew
arationf clock back to January 11
Balloon Is Acconited For
Brussels, Sept. 27.-(13y A. P.)-The
last balloon competing for the Gor-
don Bennett cup, the Belgium entry,
Prince Leopold, piloted by Beenstra
qnd Lieut. Quertin has been accounted
for.
The Prince Leopold landed at Mell-
erud and Lake Bener, in Sweden. The
distance traveled by the balloon was
less than that covered by Bemuyter,
in the Belquica, and Beymuter, ac-
cordingly, is the winner of the cup.
Mares Wil Rile hlateh
a+miT:rr 04nes 9 _it d

GLELB PLANS9
Michigan to Apply for Admission
in Intercollegiate
Organization
ITINERARY FOR YEAR
INCLUDES CHICAGO TRIP
Members of the Board in Control of
the University Glee Clubs last night
approved of the annual program sub-
mitted by the club members for the
ensuing university year. The pro-
gram this year is more extensive than
that of any year previous, say the
club members.
This year the club will make appli-
cation for admission into the Inter-
collegiate Glee Club association.
fichgan will enter the competitions
given at Chicago, where 10 mid-West-
ern schools will send their glee clubs
in an effort to determine which club
ill this section of the country is the
best. If the University is allowed to
enter and is fortunate in winning the
frst prize, the association will send
the Wolverines to New York City,
where they will enter the Eastern In-
tercollogiate competitions. All ex-
penses for this trip will be paid by the
association. In the East Harvard,
Dartmouth and all of the leading
schools in that part of the country
will sendl their clubs to New York.
Last year Wisconsin attended the
Eastern competitions. IMichigan did
not enter due to the JHop's coming on
the same time.
Bowen Will Again Direct
The coiing season the Glee club
will restrict membership to fifty.
George Oscar Bowen of the faculty .
of the School of Music will again be
(iretor. Mr. Bowen's policy this
coming year will not attempt to em-
phasize the vaudeville part of the
Club. Acts will be given, but the
music will be of a more classical call-
ber than has been the custom in past
years, and performances will attempt
to attract the concert going public of
Ann Arbor.
Several short trips, besides the
major one to Chicago, are bping
planned. There will probably be one
at Thanksgiving and several week-end
trips. The club will again give two
local concerts. Cs the Opera goes on
its trip (uring Christmas vacation the
Glee club will postpone all its activi-
ties at that time and lend as many
voices to the Opera as will be needed.
Denis-Shalwn Will Be Here
In entering the collegiate competi-
tions Michigan is attempting to bring
back some of the old student spirit in
this activity. Years ago the Glee club
made a yearly trip to the Pacific coast
and even this year several cities on
the coast have signified their inten-
t'ons of having Michigan make the
trip again but it will not be attempted
this year.
The Denis-Shawn dancers will give
another performance here this year
inder the auspices of the Glee Club on
Monday night, November 26.
ILLINOIS EX-GOVERNOR
URGES 'CENTRALIZTION'
White Sulphur Springs, W. Va.,
Sept. 27:-Centralization of all exe-
cutive functions of the federal govern-
ment within designated departments
was advocated by former Gov. Lowden
of Illinois in an address here before
the National Tax association as a
means of lessening the tax burden and
of eliminating the "deadly inertia o
boards and commissions."

Mr. Lowden deprecated the growth
of boards and commissions declaring
that they worked to bring about un-
necessary expenditure and enabled of-
ficials upon them to evade responsibil-!
ity for their acts. He recited the steps!
taken by the state of Illinois during
his administration as governor to cen.
tralize all executive functions In de-
partments and recommended the same
I course for the federal government.
Governor Lowden will be the first
ispeaker on the course of the Orotor-
1 ical association for the University.
Seven Story Building Moved
Chicago, Sept. 27.-(By A. P.)-Run-
ning water, colorful and electric ser-
vice were maintained and elevators
operated as' usual today while a seven
story buildinng at the rate of four
feet an hour for a distance of 85 feet
to make way for a street wideninng
plan. Movers estimated the weight of
the structure at 16,000,000 pounds.
Local Men to Attend Convention
Ann Arbor entanurant nrnnrietnrs

Mrs. ,Sophia Hirth Gives
Found Scholarship
Law Students.

SCIENCE BOOKS DEDICATED
TO UNIVERSITY BY LOMBARD
Appointment of Randolph G. Adams,
Professor of American History in1
Trinity college, Durham, North Caro-
lina, as custodian librarian of the
recently completed William L. Clem-
ents library, was announced by the
Board oftRegents at their monthly ses-
sion last night.
Mr. Adams is still a young man,
having received his master of 'arts
degree from the University of Penn-
sylvania in 1914. He has acquired
considerable distinction as a scholar
in American history, his specialty be-
ing the history of the Colonial and
Revolutionary periods. His book, "Po-
litical Theories of the American Rev--
olution" won, instant recognition as
a notable piece of historical work and
was awarded a prize by the American
History association. Mr. Adams
served as an officer in the American
Expeditionary Forces in France dur-
ing the World War. By reason of his
extensive investigations in early Am-
erican history and his success as a
teacher in Trinity college, he is re,
garded by labrary officials as peculi-
arly well fitted for the responsibilities
which he will assume upon his arrival
in Ann Arbor next week.
Gift Announcement,
The Regents also announced the
gift of Mrs. Sophia Hirth of Detroit
of $1,000 for a scholarship loan fund
for students in the law school as a
memorial to her son, Ralph Smith
H-irth, '10L.
Dr. Warren P. Lombard, emeritus
professor of physiology, has given to
the Universityhis entire collection of1
books, journals and publications bear-
ing on physiology and allied sciences,
is was announced.
Mr. Barney Krom of Iron River,
Michigan, has established a memorial
prize fund which will yield $50 an-
nually, that sum to be awarded the
author of the best essay on some so-
cial problem. Mr. Krom's daughter,
Eita Krom, '23, was killed this sum-
mer in the automobile accident near
Crystal Falls in which two other Uni-
versity students lost their lives.
Bishop Granted Absence.
The Regents granted William W.
Bishop, Universitylibrarian, a leave
of absence for the second semester of
the current University year. Mr. Bish-
op will spend the time granted him in'
Europe.
It was announced that the Detroit
Edison Company fellowship in high-
way engineering will be continued; al-
so, the Roy D. Chapin fellowships in
highway and highway transport engin-
eering.
Mrs. Percy Martin of Bay City was
appointed to the Alumnae house
board to succeed herself, by action of
the Regents. Miss MaryFarnsworth
of Detroit was named to succeed Mrs.
W. B. Cady.
Gun and Blade Elects OfficerA
Members of the Gun and Blade clubI
se+ igo+ht electe dnfficers for the nm-

His Ministry Is
Destined To Fall
As Bulgars Revolt
Premier Alexander Zankoff
The present revolt in Bulgaria, her-
alded by the march of 100,000 peasants
on Sofia, the capital, a few days ago,
sounds the doom of the Zankoff re-
gime, European political experts be-
lieve. Zankoff took over the reins of
government after Stamboulisky was
assassinated following the overthrow
of his cabinet. The present revolt is
referred to as an agrarian one and not
a communistic one.
AAMS' APPOINTED
LIBRARmYCUSTOD0IANI

HOPE OF THE FUTURE LIES
ECONOMICALLY FREE
POSTERITY

$1,000
for

IN

"GROUP DOMlNION
PROVES TRAGEDYl
OF CIVI1LIZATION"

to!

PRESENT GENERATION
LACKSMORAL ENERGY
Popular Speaker Charges.Students
Are Controlled by Mob
Psychology
"Leading the Crowd or Following
It" is the subject on which Dr. Albert
Parker Fitch delivered the last of a
series of three lectures at 7:30 o'clock
last night inHill auditorium. He pre-
sented the subject as, applied to the
universities of today and made clear
the moral obligation of the present
generation of students to lead the
crowd.
"The human race is deficient in
moral courage," Dr. Fitch declared,
plunging directly to the heart of his
subject. Most men have a good deal of
physical courage but are afraid to
stand up for their convictions. Two
out of three college students are al-
ways ready for a real stand up fight
but are afraid to foster their own
ideas."
Men Lack Daring
"Everyone is desperately anxious to
stand well in the opinion of his peers.
They do want to stand well with the
crowd. Even a college professor seeks
the approval of his colleagues." This
desire is especially evident in the uni-
versities according to Reverend Fitch.
It takes the form of similarity of
dress and actions among the men stu-
dents to a very marked degree. "Such
students are ruled by mob psychol-
ogy," continued the speaker. "There
is no daring of individuality." It is
simply patterning yourself on your
fellows. It is the law of the gang or
group dominion."
Treating the subject in a broader
sense, Dr.,Fitch went on to say that
"the greatest tragedy of modern civil-
ization Is inability to stand against
the crowd." Many men in history
might have been significant if they
had not been afraid of significance,"
he said. "However if you go against
the crowd you annot have the crowd's
success. If you follow your own con-
victioni you cannot have the worldly
thnigs of the crowd. You must choose
between them."
Need Men of Baring
"There must be boys and girls who
want to, try new experiments in sci-
ence, in physics, in economics and so
on," the speaker continued in a more
hbpeful vein. "Great new forward
movements have come out of uni-
versities such as Lutherism from Wit-
tenberg and they will come again.
Students cannot be satisfied with the
present economic and political hell.
"My generation has neither spirit-
ual insight nor moral energy to solve
the problems," said Dr. Fitch in clos-
ing. "The hope of the future lies in
the present generation, still econom-
ically free. , If the universities follow
the crowd they are breaking their
trust. .And it is-the men who would
give their breath for an idea and their
lives for the'tru4h who are the salt
of the earth."
American Polo Team Wins
Westbury, N. Y., Sept. 27.-03y A.
P.)- The American Shelbure polo
team, by defeating Count de Madre's
Tigers today eliminated from the na-
tional open championship tournament
the most feared of the invaders, The
score was 19 to 4.
The Tigers were outridden, outhit
and outgeneraledrin today'sncontest,
and there was never a minute after
the third chukker where they appeared
to have a chance against their Ameri-
can opponents.
Washington, Sept. 27.-Panaretoss,
of Bulgaria, was received by Secretary
Hughes upon the latter's return today
to the state department after a vaca-
tion, and made a statement upon the
situation in his country. He is un-
derstood to have said that upon the

basis of his latest advice from Sof a,
the government has affairs well in
hand.
EDITORIAL TRYOUTS WANTED I

Several staff positions are open
in the editorial department of
The Daily. Service required in-
cludes reporting and issue work.
No previous experience is neces-

I

ib

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