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November 10, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-11-10

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THE WEATHER
GENERALLY FAIR, RISING
TEMPERATURE

riFAh

a l

ASSOCIATED PRESS
LEASED WIRE SERVICE
MEMBER
WESTERN CONFERENCE
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATION

VOL. XXXIV. No. 42 ETGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER. 10, 1923 RIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CENTS

LUDENDO RFF HELD
AS PRISONER BY
fEDERL TROOPS
PLOTTED AGAINST EXISTENCE
OF REPUBLIC OPENLY AND
IN SECRET
SURRENDERS TO FORCE
OF BAVARIAN DICTATOR
Hitler, Faselsti Leader, Captured At
Same Time In War Office
Barricade
Berlin, Nov. 9.-The greatj
"beer cellar government' pro-
claimed in Munich with the an-
nounced purpose of regenerat-
ing Germany by demolishing the
republic and restoring the mon-
archy had a brief existence. To-
night it lies in ruins. Its career
ended ignominiously today in cir-
cumstances widely different from
those Intending 'its inception,
when, amid perfumes of beer and
tobacco, the burly General Erich
Ludendorff declared that he would
not flinch in the task assigned to
him.
Munich, Bavaria, Nov. 9.-General
Erich Ludendorff today lost his second
"putsch" within three years, and to-
night is observing the fifth anniver-
sary of the German revolution a pris-
oner in the custody of the federal
troops.
The man who was commander-in-i
chief of the German forces and is
credited with having lost the world
war for Germany, is tonight an igno-
ble prisoner of the young republic he
so thoroughly despised, and against
the fragile existence he had plotted
openly and in secret ever since he re-
tired to his reactionary Bavarian
stronghold.I
Surrender After Selge
Ludendorff and Adolph Hitle, who
had barricaded themselves in the of-
fices of the war ministry after the
collapse of the attempted coup
d'etat engineered by Hitler last night,
surrendered this afternoon to a de-
tachment of federal troops which had
been ordered, by Dr. Von Kahr, the
Bavarian dictator, and General von
Lossow, commander of the Bavarian
reichswehr, to lay sege to the build-
ing. Previously the Bavarian govern-
ment had dispatched an ultimatum to
both Ludendorff and Hitler who is the
leader of the Fascisti in Bavaria, de-
manding their surrender within one
hour.
There was - brief fighting between
the reichswehr and the Hitler guards
in which a few men of both sides suf-
fered casualties. Afterward Luden-
dorff and Hitler emerged from the
building and placed themselves at
the disposal of General von Lossow'sa
troops.
Status Not Defined
The status of Ludendorff and Hitler
as political prisoners has not yet
been defined, and for the moment their
capture merely marks the physical
collapse of Hitler's tragic, comic
"putsch" in which the world famed
former quartermaster of the German
armies became enveloped.r
Berlin, Nov. 9.-Information dis-
pensed by official quarters this eve-
ning would indicate that Adolph Hit-
ler's "putsch" in Bavaria scarcely
got beyond the confines of "rahts-
keller" where the Fascisti leader pro-
claimed himself dictator of all Ger-
many and Gen. Erich Ludendorff his
war minister.
Just what happened after that re-
mains-to be cleared up although the
rival versions ofthe incident which
took place in Munich last night indi-
cate that Dr. von Kahr, the Bavarian
dictator and Gen. von Lossow, of the
Bavarian reichswehr, immediately

disentangled themselves from the pre-1
vailing confusion and hurried to the
nearest barracks and there insured
themselves of the fealty of the reichs-
wehr troops.

Will Carry Daily Extras To Detroit
I N __ - _ -
--
Michigan Daily extras froma the gi. ne 1oday will be carried to De-
troit and dropped over Grand Circus lpark there by Lt. S. S. Royal, air pilot
stationed at Ferry field. Lieutenant Royal will use a racing plane to make
the trip, and it is planned to drop the first papers ii Detroit half an hour
after the final whistle of the game blows. A $5 gold piece will be present-
ed to the first person carrying a copy of the extra to the manager's desk
at the Hotel Statler. Secretary of the Navy Edwin Denby will be presented
with the first copy of the extra off the press.
I VSPL
TO OPNTESAaOVRRPAAIN

MACLAREIN SHOWN
AS T RUE ARTIST
IN PRESENTATION
GRACEFUL STAGE PRESENCE AND
CHANGEABLE VOICE PROVE
INhERENT ABILITY
HOLDS HEARERS IN HER
POWER AT ALL TIMES
Makes Characters Live Without se
of Stage Effects and Other
Dramatic Equipment
By Thomas E. Fiske
Gay MacLaren-'tis no wonder crit-
ics have called her the creator of a new
art-for if the way she was received
in her re-creation of "Enter Madame"
last night in Hill auditorium is Indic-
ative of anything, she may be called a
true artist. From her first appearance
on the stage before the large audience,
to her final words, "Exit Madame,"
her hearers were in her power at all
times.
Playing upon the imagination of
her attentive listeners she made her
characters live, and all this without
the use of the supposedly-required
stage effects, and other dramatic
equipment. That she possesses a re-
markable histrionic ability is need-
less to say, for her graceful stage pres-
ence, and her voice which she easily
changed to fit the various characters
are surely a proof of' her inherent
ability.
.MIis MacLaren Perfect Mimic
Miss MacLaren is neither a reader
nor an interrer- u)ut as the New'
York theater goers have labelled her,
a perfect mimic, "the girl with the
camera mind." For those who had
seen Gilda Varesi and Norman Trevor
play in the "theatrical city" several
seasons ago, Miss MacLaren in this
production last night proved to be a
true imitator.
Perhaps her best work was done in
her re-creation of Madame Lisa Della'
Robbia, the temperament-ridden prima
donna who plays with the affections
of her abused husband until she finally
realizes her folly. This character
could easily be visualized with Miss
MacLaren's presentation.
Opposite the madame, that is, as
concerns the versatility needed to en-
act this character, was her husband,
who was known as Gerald Fitzgerald
although usually called the Madame's
husband. Here again the re-creator
produced reality in a part. Gerald ap-
peared as the "typical American man."
,Miss MacLaren seemed to have little
difficulty in changing her voice to a
deep basso and assuming the mascu-
line posture.
Excells in All Work
But, if it were necessary to call at-
tention to her best work, all of the
characters would have to be cited.
Perhaps Bice, the madame's maid, the
Doctor, and Miss Smith, her secretary.
Frequent bursts of laughter greeted
lines from these personages.
Her artistry might properly be des-
ignated sublimated mimicry. She im-
itated, 'tis certain, for no reader hav-
ing learned the play from the manu-
script, is able to so thoroughly por-
tray people as they might actually
exist.
Miss MacLaren was apparently ev-
erywhere on the stage and yet, it was
not she, but the living acting persons
in the drama. She was at the imag-
inative stage entrances for the ap-
proach of every character, whether it
I were the Madame or her servant. In
the meantime the audience could al-
most see the other characters on the
platform.
One might say she brought Broad-
way to Ann Arbor and yet without the
cost of transportation of scenery, and

many other necessary adjuncts. The
whole long role of characters and the
expenses were eliminated.
Miss MacLaren's appearance was
the third number on the Oratorical
lecture course program for this year.
She will be in Ann Arbor today for the
Marine game, leaving for the East

Leads devil-Dogs
Here For Contest

MICHIGAN BATTLES MARINES
TO;DAY:YOST FIELD HOUSE TO
i. BE DEDICATED BEFORE GAME

i

Edwin Denby, '96L
Secretary of the Navy Denby brings
the Quantico Marines to Ann Arbor
today to meet the Wolverine aggrega-
tion. He will also make one of the
principal addresses at the dedicationj
ceremonies of the Yost field house.
SELECTED ALUM'NI
TO IHEAR BURTON

Cooley, Cabot, Rumney Also
Address Fourth Annual
Conference

To

Signing of 2,000 Students Willing toy
Buy $5 Swim'mning Ticket
Aini of Drhe
ACTUAL CANVASSING TO BE
CARRIED ON BY 80 TEAMS
Canvassing of the campus in a drivel
that will have as its aim the signing
'of 2,000 students willing to support
the Union swimming pool by buying a
;$5 swimming ticket will begin Tues-1
day. Arrangements for the campaign;
are being carried out now by the con-
mittee in charge of he drive, headed
by Edward Stark, '24, as chairman.
Records have been secured from the
registrar's office of all students and
these lists are being gone over by thej
committee and those to be canvassed
divided according to their location in
Ann Arbor. Fifty students in each
(section will be assigned to each of 80
teams who will do the actual canvass-
ng in the drive. The teams will be
made up of four men and a captain.
Attention of the students who will
be canvassed in the drive is called byI
Stark to the fact that the tickets that
they are buying are not mere contri-
butions to the pool. After the corn-1
pletion of the pool, all swimming it
will cost 25 cents for each swim. The
ticket that the students are buying on
the present drive entitles each holderl
to 20 swims in the pool, making thel
charge for each swim 25 cents.
A meeting of all captains of the
teams and of all men who will repre-
sent their fraternities will be held at
5 o'clock Monday in the reading room
of the Union. The plans for the drive
will be explained to the men at this
time and instructions as to the meth-
od of procedure will be given them.

Iiug1hes Advises Poineaire French
Restriction Would Frustrate
}Wasuhington Object
BREAK COMES OVER PROPOSAL
FOR USING AMERICAN Ail)
Washington, Nov. 9-France and the
United States came definitely to the
parting of ways today on the propos-
al of enlisting American aid towardj
the solution of the reparations prob-
lem.
Premier Poincaire was advised by
Secretary Hlughes through Ambassa-
dor Jusserand that restrictions insist-.
ed upon by France would serve to
frustrate the object of the Washing-
ton government in offering American
co-operation in an expert reparations
inquiry plan.
The state department refused to go
beyond this point in disclosing the
result of recent conversations with
the ambassador in which detailed ex-
planations of the French attitude
were made. No formal invitation to
participate in an expert inquiry is
before the Washington government
and a declination is,'therefore, not in
order. In the circumstances, no in-
vitation from the Allied powers is ex-
peted.'
t
20 DEPUTIES ADDED TO
'H&NDE TRAFFIC TOOAYI
In ant icipation of a visiting crowd
of more than 50,000 people for the
Marines game today, the Ann Arbor
police foree has added 20 deputies to
its present force to handle the traffic.
The crowvd for this game will probably
exceed that of any other event of the
year, police state, because of the par-

PROBLEMS OF UNIVERSITY
WELFARE TO BE DISCUSSED
Nearly 100 selected alumni of the
University will meet at 9:30 o'clock
this morning at the Union when
President Marion L. Bunton will ad-
dress the fourth annual conference of
alumni to discuss problems relating
to the welfare of the University.
Following President Burton's intro-
ductory remarks, Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley of the engineering college will
speak to the alumni on "The Present
Emphasis in Engineering Education."
He will be followed by Dean Hugh Ca-'
bot of the medical school who will
discuss medical education. "New Pol-
icies of tha Alumni Association" will
( be explained by Mason P. Rumney,
'08E, president of the association. The
Board of Regents will give a dinner
in honor of Secretary of the Navy Ed-
win Denby, 96L, and other noted
alumni at noon.
BanquetConcludes Session
The session will be concluded when
the alumni are entertained at a ban-
quet at 6:30 o'clock at the Union
which will be given over to a discus-
sion of the meaning of a college edu-
cation. Regent-elect Ralph Stone,
'92L, of Detroit and W. S. Penfield,
'00A, of Washington, D. C., will speak
on "What College Meant to Me."
Howard A. Donahue, '24, and Egbert
Isbell, '26L, will speak on what col-
lege education signifies to them.
"What College Should Mean" will be
the theme of addresses by-Judge Hugo
Pam, '92A, of Chicago and Arthur
Vandenburg, editor of the Grand Rap-
ids Herald.
President Rumney of the Alumni
association presided at a meeting
held last night at the Union to hear
plans for the reorganization of Mich-
igan alumni throughout the country
and to receive the report of T. Raw-
ley Tapping, field secretary of ther
association. This was the first meet-
ing of the association since its recent
reorganization.
, Prominent Alumni Gather
Among the prominent alumni in
Ann Arbor for the day are: Roy D.
Chapin, '01, of Detroit, Carl M. Green,
of Detroit, Charles A. Hughes, '01, of
Detroit, Charles Baird, '95L, of Kan-
sas City, James Baird of New York,
Fitzhugh Burns, '92, of St. Paul, Tho-
mas Clancy, '10L, of Ishpeming, Harry
jO. Evans, '96L, of Pittsburgh, Pa., Vic-
tor R. Jose, '10 of Indianapolis, Ind.,
Stanley D. McGraw, of New York city,
Stuart I. Perry, '96L, of Adrian, Al-
len B. Pond, '80, of Chicago, William
D. McKenzie, '96, of Chicago, Karl E.
Harriman, '98, of Chicago, S. E. Tho-
mason, '04, of Chicago, W. A. P.
John of Cleveland, Qhio, Arthur C.
Pound, '07, of Slingerlands, N. Y.,
Harrison B. McGraw, '91, of Cleve-
land, O., Mrs. Frances H. Moore, '90,
of Benton Harbor, Carl C. Kusterer,
'06, of Grand Rapids, and E. J. Ot-
toway, '94, of Port Huron.
LOCKWOOD VICTIM
OF APPENDICITIS

FIRST NONCOLLEGIATE TEAM MARINES TO PLAY LARGE PART
PLAYED BY VARSITY IN IN EXERCISES HELD
MANY YEARS AT 1:30
SEA SOLDWRRS COACHED DENBY, '96L', TO HONOR
IBY BECKET T AND ROPER YOST IN CEREMONIES
Wolverines Expected to Play Open Aigler to Present Field House; Mur
Game; Ends Practice in fin, Burton, Yost, Denby, Also
Signal Drill To Talk
The Devil Dogs, erstwhile. Quantico Michigan will dedicate her magni-
Marines, will face the Michigan eleven ficent new field houses to the dean of
at 3 o'clock today on historic Ferry all football coaches Fielding H. Yost,
field in an attempt to halt the Wolver- director of intercollegiate athletics
ine strng of victories, and the man who has piloted Maize
Not since the days of her pioneer adbu em o 2yas t13
teams has a Michigan eleven met a and blue teams for 22 years, at 1:30
team other than that of a college. In o'clock this afternoon. With a record
that game the Detroit athletic club of championships greater than any
was defeated by the Ann Arbor team, other team in the west and 11 all-
as it was on several other trips to American players since 1902, MichI-
the University town. Will the highly gan's Grand Old Man staJs today as
touted Marines suffer the same fate probably the greatest football author-
as the other non-collegiate gridiron ity in the country. The field house
machines that have been defeated by which will bear his name is a fit-
the Maize and Blue or will the mii- ting tribute to him.
tary outfit bring themselves glory by To honor Coach Yost and to bat-
finishing on the long end of the score tle his men in what is expected to be
today? a titalic struggle on Ferry field this
The Yostmen endedtheir week's afternoon, Edwin Denby, '96L, secre-
preparation for this game with a sig- tary of the navy, is bringing the crack
nal drill yesterday. With the exctep- football team of the United States
tion of Muirhead, VanderVoort and Marine corps 6f Quantico, Va., with
Curran, the eleven is in fine shape for him on his return to his Alma Mater
the hard fought game that is in store together with the famous Marine band
for them. and 1,500 "devil dogs" who will play
Marines Limber Up a part In the dedication exercises this
The Marines arrived In Ann Arbor afternoon.
yesterday, and limbered up a bit after Parade to Field
the long ride. The men have suffered Five special train will carry the
few injuries thus far and will present I main body of rooters from Quantico
their strongest line-up today. The arriving in Ann Arbor at the Michi-
Devil Dogs realize the importance of gan Central.station at 12:30 o'clock
this game, for which they have been this afternoon. The parade that will
pointed all season, and will fight hard start from there will follow Main
in order to emerge victorious from the I street to Liberty street, east on Liber-
fray. ty to State street, south on State
First Lieutenant "Johnnie" Beckett, Manytair ried i
former All-American tackle and play- Many i ban es arivedisof the Mt
er at Oregon under Hugo Bezdek, pres- ine corps and other officials from
ent Penn State mentor is coaching the Washington. In all it is expected that
Marines and has taught them the Bez-~i 24 planes will fly from the Capitol
dek system. Bill Roper, coach of the city to Detroit and Ann Arbor and,
Princeton eleven, was invited to coach joined by planes from Selfridge field,
the team for two weeks before the sea- will circle over the city.
son opened, and he has imparted his The dedication exercises In which
stock of football knowledge to Beck- the Marines are to play a large part
ett's charges. will commence promptly at 1:30
The visiting eleven is known to o'clock inside the Yost field house. At
have a powerful defense, the line out- 1:20 o'clock the Marine troops whll
weighing Michigan's forward wall march into the building from th
about 10 pounds to a man, just as south entrance and take the' posi-
Iowa did last Saturday. This defense tions in front of the speaker's stand.
coupled with a fast moving offense, The Marine band and the Denby party
built around Goettge, star triple threat will be on the west side of the stand
quarterback, will make the Marines a and the Varsity band and Michigan
difficult team to beat. honor guests on the east side.
Michigan Defense Strong Band Opens Program
Michigan, although somewhat weak- The Varsity band will open the
ended on the line, will present a stub- program with the playing of "The
born defense against any type of at- Victors". Prof. Ralph W. Aigler of
tack that the Marines may resort to the Law school, chairman of the
juring the contest. The only danger Board in Control of Athletics, will
lies in the fact that the line may then make the presentation of the
weaken toward the end of the game, house and Regent James 0. Murfin
as it idd playing against the heavy the' speech of acceptance. Addresses
Hawkeye line. Substitute linemen will be givent by President Marion L.
will be ready to enter the combat at Burton, Coach. Yost, and Mr. Denby,
any time. "r the latter sp-eech after a military
It is expected that the Wolverines march played by the Marine band. The
will play an open game today, al- ceremony will close with the singing
though this attack failed completely in of "The Yellow and Blue".
theTen minutes after the close of the
several formations that they have not exercises a parade composed of the
Varsity and Marine bands, the Mar-
used as yet, but which will probably ine troops and the Denby party and
be used today. honor guests will form and circle the
It has been a curious fact that to field once. The "devil dogs" will then
date the Wolverines have been able to take charge of the flag raising just
use successfully but one form of at- preceding the game.
tack in each game. Against Ohio the Besides Mr. Denby mane.national
pass game was the chief means of celebreties will be present at the
advancing the ball while attempts at game today including Henry Ford,
end running were futile. Against the Gov. Alex. J. Groesbeck, Franklin
Aggies, the end running and bucking D. Roosevelt, assistant secretary of
game swept the farmers off their feet, the navy, Admiral C. P. Plunkett,
but the passing attack was not up to commandant of the Brooklyn navy
standard. When the team journeyed yards, Commander Thornton Broad-
to Iowa City another change took head, Maj. Gen. George Lejeune, com-
place. The passing system was a com- mander of the Marine corps, and Brig.
plete failure, but one short heave to Gen. Smedley Butler, commandant at
Steger being completed. Also the end Quantico.
running attack was off color and so
Uteritz turned to the line bucking
game for advancing the ball, and this Vulcans Initiate 9
was successful. Just what mode of Senior Engineers
offense will work best today is pro-

lematical, but it appears that the for-
ward pass will work best against the Vulcans, honorary senior engineer-
invaders. ing society, initiated the following nin<
(Continued on Page Six) seniors yesterday: Robert Anderson
J. E. Duffy, George Grflin, Robert Pres-
T ton, Edward Ritchie, R. F. Rosatti, F
Volcano Erupts L. Smith, T. R. Stevens, and. F. C
At Lassan Peak Swigert.
SSO CGThe members and those to be initi-
ated gathered in front of the engineer.
Red Block, California, Nov. 9.-Las- ing shops at 3 o'clock. The anvil
sen Peak, the only active volcano in pounding and other ceremonies tool
'iC~fl~illnTai UIAic+.,+tates ns-O1....+-. plcetre.A-anue wa-hld-o

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Brinw Ticket Scalping Cases aed other attractions that will
p drawvisitors who are uninterested in

after witness:ng tue con es.
Before A thletic Association .h gan -
Temporary parking rules to be in Paris, Nov. 9.-Lecointe, French
force during the clay have been issued Ace, says he is convinced 300 miles
Fby the police, and these. rules will be an hour by airplane soon will be ex-
Cases of ticket scalping have al- json, secretary of the Athletic associa- strictly enforced. Parking will be ceeded.
ready been brought before officials of tion "have been given lenient treat- prohibited the entire day on State
the Athletic association in connection ment in the past and have abused the street from the high school to McKin-
with the Marine-Michigan game today. privileges the Athletic association has ley avenue, on Hoover between State
Action is being taken toward prosecu- 1offered them. In justice to those stu- and Division,and on Mary from Pack-!MONUMENTS
tion to the full extent of the law in dents who are sincere in their coop- ard to Hoover. M
each instance. eration with the Athletic association Six special trains will arrive at the
Professional ticket scalpers have , and for the protection of alumni, the Michigan Central depot between 12 and
been active at all main games of the association feels it imperative that the 1 o'clock. To relieve the pressure at
year at Ann Arbor during the pres- scalping practice receive the most this time, taxi cabs will be required Hot dog! The devil dogs are
ent season and Athletic associationl strenuous punishment." City police to unload passengers at Mary and with us. Today the Field House
authorities are making particular ef- and private detectives both have re- Benjamin streets. will be dedicated as a monu-
fort to bring about the arrest of these ceived instructions to make no allow- All who can possibly walk to the e dted as aitonu-
men. At the Ohio State game the ances for students in a case of scalp- game are asked to do so to relieve m
scalping was not confined solely to ing. confusion in the vicinity of the field. Service of Fielding H. Yost, the

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I continental United States has been in ; puce there. A banquet was held, for

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