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November 04, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
CLOUDY, PROBABLY
SHOWERS TODAY

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VOL XXXIV. NO. 37 TWENTY PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1923 TWENTY PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CEN'

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SPONSORS PUZZLED Ku Klux Klan's Fiery Symbols
N rINI flBeset Vicinity Of Ann Arbor

In I innsL UU I UUIII
OF DEBT QUESTIONl

RESULT OF THE LATEST
TO ENLIST U. S. AID
UNCERTAIN

MOVEI

PLAN OF A COMMITTEE
OF ENQUIRY ENTANGLED
Government Cannot Take Steps to Ex-
tricate it From Foreign
Network
Washington, Nov. 3-(By A.P.)-
The latest move to enlist America's
aid in solving the reparations puzzle,
which began so auspiciously, now has
come to a stage where even those
who sponsored it almost staunchly
are extremely uncertain of the out-
come.
Like every other recent effort to
bring American influence to bear to
halt the war wounds of Europe, th6
new plan for an expert committee of
enquiry haE become entangled in the
delicately adjusted network of rela-
tionships between London and Paris,
and in such a manner that the Amer-
ican government cannot at the mo-
ment take any steps to extricate it.
There is still hope that in the end
a workable plan will emerge from
the almost hourly exchanges that ap-
pear to be passing between the Brit-
ish and French capitals, about which
American officials have but an incon-
clusive knowledge. Such advices as
reached the State department today
did nothing to encourage confidence
in a satisfactory outcome, however,
and news dispatches from abroad
likewise were accepted as adding lit-
tle to what had gone before.
ROTHE AME DEFEATS,-
PURDUE IN FAST SIAME

Flaming crosses, whether symbolic tematic manner. The cross itself was
or not, are indubitably a novel sight about eight feet high. The wood had
in the town of Ypsilanti. At 9:30 last been wrapped with even thicknesses
night the blazing emblem of a cross of gunny-sacking, evidently previous-
situated in the vacant lot at the junc- ly dipped in some prepared chemical
tion of Washtenaw avenue and Cross having tar for one of its constitutents.
street seemed to have spirited away Much publicity 'has been given to
any curious onlookers. There were the fact that the Ku Klux Klan is
no evidences of the excitement which dominating politics in some of the
its mysterious appearance might well Southwestern states at the present
have been expected to arouse. In- time. In Texas, Arkansas, and Okla-
quirieat xdjacedt osesandpass- homa preparations are being made
quiries at adjacent houses and ps-for bitter contests in the 1924 elec-
ing motorists revealed the fact that tionsidetonteinune1eec
in spite of its central location no one tions due to the infuence exercised
had noticed the cross or the way in by this organization in that part of the
which it had been planted there. With
Friday night, three of these fiery With this appearance of the symbols
crosses were burning between here of the clan in our own vicinity it is
crossecsowerebunngethe rneapparent that some one person at
and Jackson, one near Chelsea, one least is endeavoring to secure a foot-
at Michigan Center, and the third the hold for the clan in the Middle West.t
other side of Grass Fake. All were Apparently the motto of the organiza-
apparently fashioned in the same sys- tion is "Westward, Ho!"

CAST FOR UNION
OPERA IS NAMED

DIECTORY TO BE.
' SOLD TOMORROWI

Lionel

Ames Plays Feminine Lead in
18th Annual Mimes
Production

Book Can Be Bought Only In
Of LIbrary at Center of
Campus

Front

MEYERS, DRESBACH AND STARK
ALSO TAKE PROMINENT PARTS
Cast members of the 18th annual
production of the Mimes of the Mich-
igan Union, "Cotton Stockings", has
been announced by Mr. Mortimer E.
Shuter, director. In making the an-
nouncements Mr. Shuter states that
this year's opera will include one of
the finest casts he has ever directed'
and one with which he expects to
produce an opera of the highest or-
der. Following are the names of
those ,who will have parts in the
cast.
Lionel Ames, '24, Edward Parnall,
'24, Charles D. Livingston, '25, Vernon
Meyers, '24, George Hoffman, '24,
Howard Welch, '24, John B. Hass-
burger, '23, John R. Grylls, '25E,
James Dresbach, '24, Crosby Reese,
'25, Barrie Hill, '26, and Edward C.
Stark, '24.
Lionel Ames, '24, headed the cast
of last year's opera. James Dresbach,
'24, also played in the production
last year, and his inimitable "Kate"
will long live in the annals of Un-
ion Opera history.
Mr. Shuter stated that the organ-
ization of an orchestra for the opera
is as yet incomplete. Announcement
of members will be made later.
Building of scenery is now in pro-
gress. All announcements concern-
ing scenery, however, as well as the
names of the members of the chor-
us will be made at a later date:

MILLER CONTINUES
WORK, SCORING
DOWNS

BRILLIANT
TWO

South Bend, Ind., Nov. 3.-Don Mil-
ler, star Notre Dame back, continued
his brilliant work today and was the,
stellar performer of the Notre Dame
34 to 7 victory over Purdue. Miller
scored two touchdown, made four
runs better than 25 yards, gained 50
yards after receiving passes and added
another 30 yard run after a pass, but
the play was not allowed. Miller has
been the individual star of the Notre
Dame team in its victories over
Princeton, Georgia Tech, and' Purdue.
Jimmy Crowley, running mate to
Miller flashed shorter gains and
with Stuhlersher, was on the throwing
end of Miller's passes. Layden pierced
the Purdue line for 25 yards at one
try, and added other strong gains as.
well as averaging 48 yards on his
punts.
- j
CONFERENCE
Michigan 9, Iowa 3.
Illinois 7, Chicago 0.
Ohio State 42, Dennison 0.
Indiana 32, Hanover 0.
Minnesota 34, Northwestern 14.
Notre Dame, 34, Purdue 7.
WESTERN
Ohio Wesleyan 19, M. A. C. 14.
Utah 105, Idaho 3.
Toledo Univ. 87, Finley 0.
Marquette 18, U. of D. 6.
EASTERN
Navy 9, Colgate 0.
Pennsylvania 6, Pittsburg 0.
Lafayette 6, Washington and Jeffer-
son 6.
Harvard 16, Tufts 0.
Syracuse 10, Penn State 0.
Wooster Poly 0, Rhode Island 0.
Princeton 35, Swathmore 6.
Connecticut Aggie 19, College of
City of New York 0.
Maine 28, Bowdoin 6.
Boston College 21, Georgetown 0.

GENERIaL CONSTRUCTION ANDI
PRICE THE SAME AS LAST YEAR
Off press now, the Student .Direc-
tory for the year 1923-24 vrill be on
sale tomorrow morning, and at the'
center of the campus only, according
to Thomas G. Kindel,. '24, business
manager. The cover of. the year's is-
sue will be orange, and more com-
plete information regarding general
campus organizations will be given
than in former issues. Several new
organizations have been added to the
list.
The price is the same as last year's
Directory, 75 cents. The general
construction and most of the material
is practially the same as in previous
years, though the contents have been
carefully revised, and errors correct-
ed. Elligible writing, ignorance of
phone numbers and carelessness in
filling out registration cards among
the students have caused most of the
inaccuracies.
The business manager announces
that the Directory will be on sale
only one day, and says that as the
number of Directories is limited, and
that purchases should be made then.
Last year the editors of the Directory
received over five hundred calls for
the book which they could not fill be-
cause of the limited number printed.
Only one hundred extra copies have
been printed this year to take care
of this demand.
Late Wire Briefs
Of World's News
Doorn, Holland, Nov. 3-(By A.P.)
-The former German Crown Prince,
Frederick Wilhelm, and his faithful'
aide, Major Von Mulner, are still at
Wieringen, according to the latest in-
formation reaching Doorn. Both are
reported to be abed with influenza.-
Coblenz, Nov. 3-(By A.P.)-Jo-
seph Matthes, the separatist leader,
announced today in what he labeled
an official communique, that it was
the intention of the separatists to re-

DE PAHMANN To
PLAY AT RECTAL
AT TOMOROW NIGHT~
NOTED PIANIST WILL BE SOLOIST
AT SECOND CHORAL UNION
SERIES CONCERT
HAILED AS GREATEST
CHOPIN INTERPRETER
Aged Artist Making Farewell Tour
Of Country This
Season
Vladimir de Pachmann, world fam-
ous pianist, will be the soloist at the
second of the regular Choral Union
concerts tomorrow night in Hill aud-
itorium. De Pachmann is called the
world's greatest exponent of Chopin,
and his program for tomorrow will be
entirely given over to Chopin num-
bers. The veteran pianist, now 75
years old, is making his farewell tour
of America this season. He comesI
now before a new generation of con-
cert-goers in this country, because for -
ten years he has not visited America,i
for no other reason than that his aud-
iences in England and Italy have been
unfailing and insistent in their de-
mands for his appearance.
He must, now, as he himself says,
"disclose to America the last word in
piano playing." The tale of his eccen-
tricities is long and amusing. Never
will he fail to tell his audiences the
complete story of his own worth.
What he has to say is in fact as in-
forming and a delightful' as is his
playing. Ann Arbor is looking for-
ward, with eagerness to his appear-
ance here, the more so because of I
the erratic reports which have been
broadcasted regarding his perform-;
ances. His 'recitalW in' this country
recently 'have attracted much atten-
tion among critics and music lovers,
as much because of his expressions
of self-admiration as because of the r
artistry of his playing.t
Hris program of Chopin compositions
will be made up of the following:
e I t
Nocturne, Op. 27, No. 1, C sharp
minor. .t
Ballade, No. 3, Op. 47, A fat major.a
Scherzo, No. 4, Op. 54, E major
II
Etude, Op. 10, No. 7, C major. C
Etude, Op. 25, No. 2, F minor.
Etude, Op. 25, No. 3, F major.
Etude, Op. 25, No. 7, C sharp minor.
Berceuse, Op. 57, D fat major.
Polonaise, Op. 40, No. 1, A major.<
(military).,
III
Prelude, Op. 28, No. 3, G major.
Prelude, Op. 28, No. 22, G minor.
Prelude, Op. 28, No. 15, D flat major.
Mazurka, Op. 67, No. 4, A minor.
Mazurka, Op. 33, No. 4, B minor.
Valse (Posthumous) E minor.
Valse, Op. 70, No. - G flat major.
Grande Valse, Op. 42, A flat major.
A number of seats in the first rows,
of the main floor of the auditorium
are available for this concert. Since
these seats will be covered by a sup-
plementary stage at the time of the
Festival, they obviously could not be
sold as patron's tickets. Those hold-
ing undesirable seats in other portions
of the auditorium may exchange them
for individual concerts from this sec-
tion so long as the limited number
available remain. The concert will
begin promptly at 8 o'clock.
DETROIT SHOP TO
AID LEAGUE FUND

Vladimir De Pachmann
Vladimir De Pachmann, famous pi-
anist, wvho has been called the
world's greatest exponent of Chopin,
will be the soloist at the second reg-
ular Choral Union concert tomorrow
night at Hill auditorium.
SEE GRAPH GAME
2,000 See Presentation at Armory Hall;
Prominent Men
Present
INSTRU:MENT GOT ON THREE
YEAR CONTRACT FROM FIRM
By Special Correspondent
Detroit, Nov. 3-Two thousand alum-
ni of the University of Michigan wit-
nessed a presentation of the grid bat-
tle at Iowa City yesterday afternoon
in the Detroit armory. A device man-
ufactured by the Grid-Graph Com-
pany, Columbus, 0., exactly similar to
the one used in Hill autitorium, was
used here. A representative of the
company accompanied the graph from
Columbus and supervised its opera-
tion.
The crowd, which assembled in the
spacious structure shortly before 3 o'-
clock and stayed until the last minute,
was full of enthusiasm and respond-
ed again and again to the calls for
cleers issued by their leader, J. J.
Collison, '17. Willie Heston, who was
one of a number of prominent alumni
present, came in for his share of
the applause, as did President Mathe-
son, of the Detroit Alumni association,
who arranged for the grid-graph pre-
sentation.
MVr. vMatheson expressed regret to
the reporter that the necessity of sup-
ervising this work forced him to miss
his first football game in six years.
The grid-graph has been secured on
a three year contract and will be us-
ed again in the Armory to reproduce
the Wisconsin and Minnesota games
this season.
Warthin Addresses Chemical Men
Dr. A. S. Warthin, of the Medical
school was the principal speaker at
a banquet Friday night for the initi-
ates to the Phi Lambda Upsilon, hon-

Will Play Here
Tomorrow Night

Majestic
Nets

Drive
Band $2151

Seymour Simons, '17E, who is di-
recting the orchestra which has been
playing at the Majestic theatre and
Gerald E. Hoag, manager of the the-
ater, are the originators of the latest
collection movement to send the band
to the Wisconsin game.
Yesterday at the afternoon per-
formance of his orchestra, in a space
between the coming of returns from
I the Iowa game, Simons made a short
speech, incorporated in an interest-
ing monologue, announcing that the
manager of the theater had offered
to double any amount the audience
was willing to contribute to send the
band to Wisconsin. Accordingly,
ushers "passed the bucket", and
$107.51 fell. Hoag is holding $215.02
until he can find the proper author-
ities to whom he can entrust it.
Hoag declares that the collection will
at least send the drum-major and a
clarinet or two.
GRID-GRAPH TRIES
AUDIENCE PATIENCE
Reports of the Michigan-Iowa game
on the grid-graph in Hill auditoriumn
yesterday afternoon were slow in coin-
ing in, and the patience of the audi-
ence that filled the main floor and the

i

_ __ _ _ __ _ _ A ! _ _ 7 . !Y L _ _ 7 7 _

occupy Aix-la-Chapelle. orary chemical sociey
Ten per cent of all purchases made
at the Himelhock's specialty shop of The twelve students who were initi-
New York, Nov. 3-Jake Schaefer, Detroit either by undergraduates or ated are: A. M. True, Lloyd L. Scott,
of Chicago, former champion, is fav- 'alumnae of the University of Michigan, Geo. E. Bossardet, F. W. Warner, Har-
orite to win the 18.2 balkline billiard will be given to the University of old W. Jackman, Wim. A. Meyers, Geo.
title. !Michigan League building fund. W. Whitney, Frank J. L. Van Natta,
Miss Frances Ames, '23, is in Donald Balcombe, Claude L. Clark,
Chicago, Nov. 3-Christian educa- charge of the special shopping service Campbell Robertson, Donald J. Reese,
tion is being given to 151,370 native for University women and on Tuesday and Spencer A. Weart.
pupils in 3,790 schools in foreign and Wednesday of every week she will
lands. conduct special displays of feminine - |'I
apparel at Polly Little's tea shop on ARMISTICE DAY PROGRAM I
Ingalls street. At this time she will I PLANNED To BE VNUSUAL E
IN MEMORIA31 DEFATS ZEV, I be ready to accept personal orders al-I |
M OWN, IN LATONIA UPSET I so. The Detroit shop will attend to # Combining with the University !
I any requests send in by mail or tele- post and city post of American
! Latonia, Ky., Nov. 3.-By A. P.) phone and prompt service is guaran- I Legions, the S. C. A. will render j
A Kentucky bred and owned horse, I teed. In making purchases through I its second Sunday services of the
with a Kentucky boy in the saddle, 4,Himelhock's, University women are:j year at 4 o'clock next Sunday
I caused the greatest surprise that j1urged to note the fact that they are Armistice day, in Hill auditorium. I
I has climaxed a turf spectacle in !for the benefit of the League fund. I Bishop flenderson will be the I

drive for the goal. In the third per- bury on his own 25 yard line. K
iod, taking the ball on their own 37 limmediately punted out of danger
yard line, Grange opened with a three the Wolverines from then on
yard plunge at the line and Mclllwain Coach Jones' team at a safe dista
added five. Grange added five for (Continued on Page Six)
first down, and then won his way
through the Chicago team for 23
yards around end and placed the ball I UNION FRESHMAN GROUPS
on Chicago's 22 yard line. He added .I BEGIN S"PEEDBALL TOURN)
15 on the next play around end and'I
Illin-ois had seven yards to go for a I Speedball tournaments betwe
touchdown. After Mclllwain had add- the freshmen groups formed by t
ed two more, Grange took the ball i Union in their new freshman a
straight through the center of the line ( ivities department will be stag
for the only touchdown. Britten's I this week. Schedules for t

years today, when In Memoriam
deeated the peerless Zev and his I

Former Students Promoted

principal speaker. The Glee Club
will sing patriotic songs and it is

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