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October 30, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-10-30

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THE WEATHER .z I
CLOUDY AND SOMEWHAT
COOLER ElV
E
VOL. XXXIV. No. 32 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1923 EIGHT PAGES

ASSOCIATED PRESS
EASE!) WIRE SERVICE
MEMBER
WESTERN CONFERENCE
DITORIAL ASSOCIATION
PRICE, FIVE CENTS

CARRIE CATT SAYS
DIVISION OF DUTY
BETTERFOR WORLD
ADDRESS GIVEN LAST NIGHT IN
HILL AUDITORIIM BY WOMEN
SUFFRAGE LEADER
DECLARES WOMEN HAVE
V O TtE IN 26 N A T I ONS
Claims Progress in South America
Retarded by Mixture of
Nationalities
Stressing the fact that the women's
movement was not at an end, but that
it would continue on through the ages
until men and women could find a way
to come to some conclusion and to-
gether solve the problems of the
world, Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt pre-
dicted, in her lecture on the "Woman's
World Movement" last- evening in Hill
auditorium, that there must be some
division of duty between the two
sexes. She emphasized that there
must be no superiority-only an ever
growing understanding whereby the
men an women of the country would
rebuild a well nigh ruined world.
"Most people believe," stated Mrs.
Catt, "that the woman movement be-
gan when women asked for the vote
and ended when women secured it.
but indeed it has not ended and will
not end until there has , come this
mutual understanding as to how men
and women can co-operate in the
world's work."
Relates Experiences
Mrs. Catt accounted some of her
experiences in foreign countries in
connection with the woman suffrage
movement. She spoke of the Chinese
ladies in their struggle; of the Buddist
women, and of the campaign for the
vote in India where the women have
won infour of the chief provinces.
In South America, explained Mrs. Catt,
there Is a drawback because of the
mixed races. The universities are
open to women in this country but not
one woman of the old Spanish fami-
'lies attends these universities. It is
not considered to be good form for a
girl to go to a university. If they pe'
sist i. going they must take their rep-
utation in hand and be willing even to
be called immoral.
Women have the vote 1i 26 nations
of the world today, and it is a fact!
well worth considering, according to
Mrs. Catt that 24 nations gave the vote
to their women before our nation did.
Revolution brought the vote to a few
countries, and the desire of being just
to .the wonen who had served their
part in the war was another reason
for the granting of suffrage. Then
again, all Athe civilized nations in the!
world had emancipated their slaves
before we even had a civil war.
Discuss Superiority
All the argunents and the opposi-
tion of the men towards the suffrage
movement have arisen from the "su-
perior complex" of men. "Men may
be superior to women," declared Mrs.
Catt, "but they have not proved it by
taking away from the women the five
avenues through which men have
traveled to their posts of leadership.
There had never been a woman who
has not at some time been affected by
her "inferiority complex." Women
are eliminated from positions of
standing because the 'salary paid is
considered too large for a woman or
because the position is "a man's job."
In conclusion, Mrs. Catt spoke of
the economic question which is now
troubling the nation. How to main-!
tain a family, how to keep the race
moving is the ever press'ng question
now at hand. "Push, pull, lift or
carry a part of the world's great load
-men and women together until the

men's movement and the women's'
movement can be merged together
into one tolerant understanding of the
whole."
German Divorce Rate Grows
Berlin, Oct. 29.-Last year the Ger-
man capital had 2,000 divorces; Cer-'
many still is short of the United States
record-125,000 divorces to 1,000.000
marriages, but the press says the rate
is growing right along.
WHAT IS BRIDGE?
Without a table. Suppose you
had been playing a card game
with your friends, and one day
your l idge table disappeared.
Would you be foolish and try to
hunt for it yourself, or would
you be wise and call

Important Figure
In Rhine Republic
..
al :
Dir, Hans A. Dorten
Dr. Hans A. Dorten is one of the
leading fikures in the movement to es-
tablish a republic in ithenish Prussia,
Germany. It is believed he will be
{named first president if the republic
'becomes a reality..
! -
SAXONYCABINEIT
FR0CEDTO QUIT1
Berlin's Move To PunsiR I adit-l'
Still In Initial Stage; Coal
Uncertain

HEIN ON UNION
LIFEME BERSHIP
CAMPAIGN TODAYI
STUIWN' IO)Y To BE COVERED
BY MOR1.E TIAN 200
SOLICITORS
1400 NEW SUBSCRIBERS
NEEDED AT THIS TIME
Drive Started Ywith Meeting in Union;
hynch, 'stark, and Campbell
Speak
Two hundred students will start to-
day as solicitors in a three day cam-
paign that has as its object the obtain-
ing of 1,400 new life members for the
Union. Every student not already a
Ffe member will be solicited by these
men in an effort to reach the estab-
lished goal.
The men who will work in the drive
gathered in the Assembly hall of the
Union last night to receive final in-
structions as to the methods of solic-
itation that they are to use and to
hear words of encouragement with
which to start their campaign. They
were addressed by Thomas Lynch,
'25L, president of the Union, Edward
Stark, '24, chairman of the drive, and
Calvin Campbell, '24E, chairman of the.
drive last year.
E4xpl ain System
Methods that prove most satisfact-
ory in obtaining subscribers were ex-
plained to the men by Stark, who was
high man in the number of new mem-'
bers obtained in the drive last year.
Lynch spoke on the purpose of the

SUNKEN SUBMARINE RAISED;
Ch..fTWO CREW MEMBERS SAVED
Panama, Oct. 29.-(By A. P.)-
The American submarine 0-5,
which was sunk in a collision
with the steamer Abangarez yes-
ferday was raised shortly after 1j
Io'clock this afternoon.
I!Chief electrician Lawrence
1 Brown and Torpedoman Henry
Breault, were rescued alive from
the hLull and taken to Colon Hos-
Ipital. No trace was found of the
two other m'ssing men. It is
SthoughtBrown and Breault may
recover.
FOR HA WKEYE TRIP
Iowa Journey (annot Bie Made Unless
Student Body and Alumni
Raise Sum
ALUMNI VINU(OWA ASSURE
ALL CO-OPERATION NEEDED
Unless the combined efforts of al-
umni and students can raise $1,900
within the next few days, the Varsi-
ty band will not make the trip to the
Iowa game Saturday, according to
Robert A. Campbell, treasurer of thej
University andy factulty advisor of the
organization. The Wisconsin trip is
practically assured.
Of the $2,900 needed for the IowaI
trip $1,000 was raised by passing the1
buckets at the Ohio game. This will
be used as a starter for the fund for
the Wisconsin trip if further funds
do not make it available for the trip
this week. The alumni of the Univer-
sity in the state of Iowa have wired
T. Hawley Tapping, field secretary of
the Alumni association, asking what
can be done by them to make pos-
sible the trip of the band, and assur-I
ing him of their co-operation in the
matter. It seems improbable, how-
ever, Mr. Campbell believes, that they
can raise enough money in the short
time left to nake the trip possible.
Elven if thet $1,900 were to be raised
it is probable that expenses may in-
crease due to the fact that the spe-
cial train has not been supported by
the student body.
If this weeks trip is not made, theI
band will go to Wisconsin. The re-
umainder of the amount needed, $1,-
900 will be raised by the proceeds
from a band bounce that will be given
in the near future and a moving pic-
ture show which the organization
plans to hold in Hill auditorium.

BIG TEN EDITORS
H WILL MEET HERE
FR CONVENTION
' WESTERN CONFERENCE EDITOR-
IAL ASSOCIATION TO CON-
VENE IN DECEMBER
EXACT DAY OF EVENT
TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON
Object of Gathering Is to Discuss
Campus and Journalistie
Problems
Editors of all Big Ten publications
will gather in Ann Arbor sometime
around Dec. 1 in the third annual
meeting of the Western Conference
Editorial association, according to
word received here yesterday.- The
convention has been called by Albert
H. Tousley editor of the Minnesota
Daily, president pro-tem of the asso-
ciation. The exact day for the con-
vention will be known in a few days.
A bid asking for, the convention in
Ann Arbor was extended to the mem-
bers last year by Marion Stahl, '25L;
editor of The Daily last year. Favor-

Heads Movement
To Enforce Law

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I 14110fn ndthe work tat the soicitors
REICH REPRIESENTED IN were dong in the interest of the club.
SECTION BY DR. IELNZ Ile urged all of the men to cooperate
to the greatest extent in making the
Berlin, Oct. 29.-(y A. P.)--ChanI- campaign of this year a success.
cellor Stresseman's punitive expedi- Campbell, chairman of last year's
tion into "Red" Saxony is still in the capinr odte ino h no
tion m ycampaign, told the men of the Union
initial stages and it will be several as a club. Ie stressed the points of
dlays before its further progress re- a lb H tesdthjonso
advantage lying in this purpose of the
veals whether it is intended as some- organization, and urged the use of this
thing transcending the mere limit of a
controversy with a fleerated state point in obtaining the new life mem-
over the question of constitutional ssers.
perogatives. If the canpa gn is carried to a sue
The Chancellor of the Reich has ap- cessful end in the pasring of the quota,
pointed Dr. Carl Heinz as commis- all students working on the drive will
sioner representing the Reich in Sax- be given a banquet in the Assemblyj
ony. Dr. Heinz immediately demand- hall of the Union on November 7, ac-
ed the resignation of the Saxony cal)- cording to an announcement from
inet and the ministers complied with Hlomer lTeaith, manager of the Union,
his demands, withdrawing from of- last night. If the quota is not passed,
flee at the time set. only the members of the winning team
Diet Meeting Banined will be given the banquet.
General Von Mueller, who com- Hans Gives Cup
mands the Reichswehr here and in Additional incentive toward the se-
Saxony prohibited the diet from meet- curing of new subscribers is being
ing. What further steps are t, )be given to the solicitors again this year
taken by the central government has in the presentation of the Hans Cup
not developed.Tecentlgo to the student having the highest
ment office obviously holds the whip number of new members at the end
hand over Dr. Zeigner anld his radio-.Ts
al administration in that it has liter- of the three day rive. Tile cup isE
ally honeycombed with Reichswehr de- Ana by Otto ans tO of the
tachments, thus precluding the pos- Ann Arbor Press, and is to become the
sibility of physical outbreaks. So far permanent possession of the winner.
as competent political opinion in Workers on the drive will report at
Reichstag circles is concerned, even the Union at 10:15 o'clock every night
down to the ranks of the moderate so- I to report the results of their work.
cialists, it may be said that the grov- The total of all new signed members
ernment drastic procedure is being will be compiled each night and the
viewed as highly preferable to an I results published in The Daily.
attitude of waiting; upon the pleasure Changes have been made in the per-
of the Saxon Communists, who, de- sonnel of the team captains who willf
spite their minority in the Zeigner conduct the teams in the campaign.
ministry, were rapidly becoming a The new captains together with the
menace not only to Saxony but to the numbers of their teams are as follows:
other proletarian sections of Ger- Team 1, W. F. Austin, '26; 2, Joseph
many. i Armijo, '25; 3, THal Coates, '25E; 4,,

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able action on the bid has been tak-
en by the members of the association
in correspondence between the
schools, and the action of Tousley fol-
lowed the complete canvassing of
those represented.
'To Discus Problem4
The Western Conference Editorial
association is a gathering of all Big
Ten editors meeting each year to fos-
ter a better spirit between the pub-
lication of the schools and offering a
means by which campus and journal-
istic problems may be discussed. i
The association was established ,t.
the University of Michigan in May,
1921, when the first meeting was held
under the chairmanship of Brewster
P. Campbell, '21, editor of The Daily
at that time. The second meeting was
held at the University of Minnesota in
May, 1922.
Postponed Last Year
The meeting last year was sched.-
uled to be held at Northwestern Uni-
versity but the Mount'hazing case that
occurred at the time caused the post-
ponement of the meeting indefinitely.
George Dworshak, editor of the Min-
nesota Daily last year, was president
of the association last year.
A new function for the association
may be undertaken this year in the
invitation of the business managers of
the publications to the conference.
The opinion of the present association
members is being taken in this mat-
ter, and if the project is carried
through, the new system will be car-
ried into effect at this year's confer-
ence.
KAPPI LOROR TO SPEA
A T ARCHITECTS, SMOKER'

Gov. Alex J. Groesbeck
State executive of Michigan who
presided at a meeting held yesterday
in Detroit of federal, state, and coun-
ty officials. The outcome of this meet-
ing was the passing of resolutions
which are expected to have a powem[ul
influence on the enforcement of the,
federal prohibition laws in this st-ate.
[OWEN TO ADDRESS
PR.ESSI CLUB TODAY1
Journalist To Attend Initial Meeting
Of Student Organization
In Ann Arbor
CLUB TO DISCUSS D1FFERENT
ANGLES OF PRESS PROBLEMS
Discussing the American press
from different viewpoints, The Stu-
dent Press club will meet at S o'clocf(
tonight at the Green Tree Inn. an
Swift of Detroit who is to spew at
the meting will use as his subject,
"Pressing the Public".
Russel D. Owen, of Schenectady,
New York will speak upon "Newspa-
pers", thoroughly discussing the top-
ic. James Maloney, '24, who was with
the Hearst's organization during the
summer,. Ralph N. Byers, '24, sporting
editor of the Daily, and Robert M. Mo-.
riarity, '24, head of the editorial
board of the Daily will also speak.
If one is judging Mr. .Swift's letter
of acceptance, the meeting is to be an
unusual one. Mr. Swift feels that his
views on the press are "too hetro-
dox" for ordinary consumption. As
one who holds the degree of "Seven
P's"-some of which are poet, painter,
psychologist, philosopher, and politi-
cian-the Poet of the North-has am-
munition to back up 'his statement.
Mr. Owen who recently accepted the
editorship of a new publication of the
General Electric company, "The Mon-
ogram" has a background of ten years
on New York newspapers which will
give him much to talk on. Arrange-
ments have been made with the host-
esses of the Green Tree Inn, located
at 205 South State street, to serve cof-
fee and doughnuts later in the eve-
ning to fifty persons. Admittance will
be limited to members of the Students1
Press club 'and those of the faculty
who care to attend.
V A

TRIUMIRATE WILL
ENFORCE LIQUOR
LAWSIN MICHIGAN
FEDERAL OFFICERS WILL HAVE
COMPLETE CHARGE OF
SITUATION
GROESBECK MEETS WITH
GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS
County and State Courts Will Have
Enough Deputies to Function
Prdhrmtl
Detroit, Oct. 29.-A triumvirate of
law enforcement agencies to drive
liquor from Michigan was born at a
conference here today at which Gov-
ernor Alex J. Groesbeck presided. As
a result of the conference the full
strength of thetfederal. government,
the state and the county are- to be
coordinated to work as a unit in a
(weeping attempt' to dry up the state.
The meeting was called on short
notice and was closed to newspaper
men. Gov. Groesbeck issued a state-
ment following the conference in
which he explained what was decided
upon. Under the program accepted at
the conference he said federal author-
ities hereafter are to have charge og
all operations relative to the importa-
tion of liquor across the border and
the stuation in refe'rence to breweries,
the state to furnish such a system in
the way of funds, equipments and men
as shall be deemed necessary.
Legal and court problems will be
submitted to prosecuting attoreys of
the county, the U. S. district attorney
and the state attorney general's o ce,
the state undertaking to furnish a
sufficient number of deputy attorney
generals to dispose promptly of thet
matters.
SWIMING, POOL DRINE
HAS PASSED01000 MARK
COMMITTEE MAKING RECANVAS
OF ALL FINATERNITY
HOUSES
Progress of the drive for the coin-
pltion of the Union swimming pool,
which has passed the first quarter
toward its quota of 4,000 swimming
tickets, was discussed at a meeting
of the "4,000" club ysterday after.
noon in the swimming pool of the
Union.
Many fraternity houses and rooming
houses have been canvassed to date
and a table for the convenience of
students has been kpt at the center
of the campus during the past three
days.
In commenting. on the situation,
members of the committee of the
drive, after being asked what the fians
were for the coming week, stated that
"a great share is now up to the su m
dent body to decide." The committee
-is recanvassing many of the fratern-
ity and rooming houses. 'Workers are
trying to sell tickets only to Michigan
men.
James A. Beresfords '24, chairman
/of the campaign for the completion of
the Union swimming pool, is quoted
as saying, "The University of Michi-
gan Union is the best of its kind in
the United States. In only one way is
it not complete, its swimming pool
temains unfinished. Practically every

EXPECT

300 TONIGHT AT

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EPISCOPALIAN BANQUET1

4

DE AN

SCARLETT WILL
ON THE :EUROPEAN
SITUATION

SPEAKj

"The European Situation as I Saw
It" is the title of the talk to be given

by Dean William Scarlett of Christ i
church, 'Cathedral of St. Louis, at the BOXING, GYMNASTICS TO TAKE
banquet of the University Episcopal- PLACE AT GATHERING
ians to be held at 6 o'clock tonight in TONIGHT
thiasemly oo of the Union.
the assem y ro back from Europe Architects will be addressed by Wil-
"Welhavecome ,,Liam L. Kapp, of the firm M 3mith,I
dead against France, said Dean Scar- Hinchman and Grills of Detroit at a
lett at the Sunday evening supper in smoker to be held at 8 o'clock tonight
harris hail. "That is not a very coi- in the upper reading room of the
mon stand now," he continued, "but it Uin.upra disussfthe
willbe i sixmonts."Union. Mr. Kapp will discuss the ,few
will be in six months." Yost Field house. Mr. Kapp has been
The Dean was one of a party headed ,I1Yst'ielp osM. Kap bag heen
c losely eonneeted with thia buildine

Political Sit iat aian T ens5
Both political and social situations
in Saxony have reached such a crit-
ical stage that President Ebert became
convinced that it calkqd for a strong
show of authority by the central gov-
ernment as Saxony was rapidly devel-
oping into an imcubator for German
bolshevism. The Berlin authorities
were also impressed withtie urgent
need(Iof giving tile Saxon industrial-
inst mecessary protection against come-
iunistic terrorizing, in order to balt
the economic cohla pe in which the
niations most prolific industrial and'
commercial sector was being threat-
fnedl.

William E. Day, '26E; 5, Nat Ely, '25E; I
6, Kenneth DuPree, '26; 7, Bradley
Habight,'25; 8, Robert Halsey, '25; 9,

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SOUTHERN WA0 SPIRIT!
Richmond, Oct. 29.-(By A. P.)-
David Lloyd George, war time premier
of Great Britain, in an address here'
today urged that America cast her
might "on the side of humanity and
peace."t
"My last appeal in leaving the capi-
tal of the South," he said, "is an ap-
peal to you who have memories of a
great war which waged around this
capital and who have more recent
memories of another war where you

I , ., ' ', ."., Vie y U u J g 11 u s 1U lill' - " w. u aaa~a. .. w~a wxr u ~ 1
Alfred Ilolzma'n, '26; 10, Lucius Lally, by Sherwood Eddy, Y. M. C. A. secre- from the beginning of its co stru.nan in the University is a member of
'2'; 11, Harry Messer.'26 12, Charles tary who will speak to the Older tion, having outlined 'and planned the MEEINGS DURINb the Union and all show a great pride
iVurray, '2>; 11, Frederick Inney, '25; Boys' Conference next month, which entire undertaking. I in the building, but there is still one
14, John Plain, '25; 15 Perry Shannon, I devoted th'e summer to a' study of the Prf. E. M. Lorch, of the 4.r(ritec -lack spot. We are hoping that stu-
'26; 16, Cal Trempf, '26; 17, Kenneth European situation at first hand. They tural school, ,will also give a talk at -Hawley Tapping, '16L, field secre- gents Will respond to our offer with
Patterson, '25; and 18, Sidney Trem-, spent several weeks in England; where the smoker. Many features i. the tary of the Alumni association, left more hnthusiasm durng the remainder
ble, '26,. 'they had many opportunities to confer way of entertainment are to be offered, yesterday for a trip to Iowva, planning 'of the drive."
Life membersiip charges in the with British leaders, and traveled in accord'ng to the committee in charge stop at several cities en route to
Unmion to stuIemnts while inm the 'Uni- France and Germany, including 'the Three exhibition boxing bouts will be Iaddress alumni meetings there, before
versity are $50, payable in $10 yearly Ruhr. stgd . H. Bar,'4,will opos arriving Saturday to be present at theG~D GAH TCESO
Unio to tudets wile n th IniFrane an Geranyincldintaghed.exh barrybxin bots4illb Alumni baurn eaut sthll be foe P maintainedr 5, aal n$1 eryRhrsae.J H ar,'2A ilopoeIarvngaudyt~b rfetatte
installments. Of this sumthe final I Over 300 faculty members and stu- R. E. Oester, '25A, in the first bout.,Alunibureau thatwwumtnt emahEtasna
regular p~ayment iu the Union of $6 in , dents are expected to attend the bar- E. F. Ritchie, '24E, versus H. V. Manor, at IowlCty
the final year, is7 subtracted, making a quet this evening at which Prof. R. .2A,'form the second contest and i He spoke at a banquet of the Kala-
mazM. Wenmneyaof thehtPhilosophyledepart- E FO'.W
total of $44 for the complete fee. The M. Wenley of the Philosophy depart- principals for the third bout have not
charge for life membership after the, ment will act as toastmaster. Seward been announced. The exhibitions are for Chicago. He will stop to meet
first year following graduation is $100. Bean, '24, of Grand Rapids, will speak to be of three minute rounds each. A with alumni at Rockford, Illinois. to- Tickets will go on sale today at
-' .__on "Tremendous Trfles." member of the faculty' will act as night. His itinerary also includes Wahr's and Graham's booktores, Hus-
Kennedy's orchestra will furnish referee. Waterloo, Cedar Rapds, and Iowa ton's and the Union for the grid-graph
s'sCity. of the Michigan-Iowa game that will
a eusic aind George Oscar Bowen will An act' of gymnastics .willbe stagedn, At Cedar Rapids he will address an be reproduced in Hill auditorium nekt
quet may be procured at the book- '24A. Music by the eight iece or- alumni ?unheon at which Coach Field- Saturday while the game is in pro-
sores or at Hrshall. chestra will be furnished througut ing H. 'ost will als'j speak. gress. The charge will be 35 cents
tos aHthhlevening. A light lunch ' Mr.Tapping is making this speak- Ifor the balcony and 50 cents for down-
-F"smokes are to be served. i ing tour a this time to take advant- stairs.
TEtusxFile, Pa., O 29.( .FRANCAISaThe committee in charge of the a i of the spirit geica h by t itIs the band doesnot goto owaity,
- On ,man was killed instantly, an- TO MEET TONIGHT smoker follows: J. E. Fronezakc, chair TIwa-Micign game, which many it is expected that it will furnish mus-
other died later of injuries and three man, J. E. Dinwiddie, R. F. Calder, and Iumni in that sectin ot the country ic for the gathering, otherwise some
other persons, two of them women, D. D. Boothby, all senior architects. are expected to attend. Special trains other organization will be secured by
'were seriousl injured late today Cercle Francais will meet tonight in I will run from Kansas City, Nb., the Alumni association 'which has
we aseriou rn A.ex I the society room to elect a new fac- Cartier Named Cubani Minister Omaha, Neb., and Minneapolis, Minn. charge of the graph.
whe a ankcam ofgasolin explod- -
(ed at the American Oil works. l ire I ulty %director. Prof. Marcel Clavel of Brussels, Oct. 29.-Baron De Car- The field secretary had just returned John P. Bradfield, '22, business man-
followed the explosion iii o of tihe the Romance languages department tier ambassador to the United States, Sunday from a tour of several Michi- ager of the Alumnus has charge of
reinig buildings. 'Time loss was es- was elected to direct the society this also has been named Belgian minister gan towns, having spoken in Alpena the arrangements. Cheerleaders will
tima ted at $50,000. year but is unable to serve owing to 3 to-Cuba. Washington being considered at a banquet of alumni held in con- also be present to instill pep Into the

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