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September 26, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-09-26

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Ar Ar
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AV

Section

One

P.

VOL. XXXIV. No. 3 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 192 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CENTS

F
1 i

Y 1

"All members of the class of '27 will
gather at 7:30 o'clock tonight at the
Union for the annual freshman re-
ception, the first big social gathering
1eld every year by the incoming class.
The reception will be held in the as-
sembly hall. President Marion L.
Birton will give the address after
wich each freshman will have a
4hance to shake hands with him.
The reception is annually held by
tbe Union that the freshmen may have
o opportunity to become acquainted
with one another, and to learn about
toe customs and traditions of the Un-
fv~rsity. Preceding President Bur-
tqn's talk, Charles W. Merriam, '25E,
chairman of the Union underclass ad-
visory committee, will give a short
speech concerning the relationship of
the first year men and their upperclass
advisors. Thomas J. Lynch, '25L, will
preside.
The affair is not only to have on its
- hedule talks, but eats, music by the
Uriion orchestra, and a get-acquainted
entertainment. All upperclassmen
who are acting as freshman advisors
for the Union are urged to get their
men to attend the reception.
MTE SET FOR MEETING
OF PROMINENTLUMNI
INFORKA. CONFERENCE CALLED
TO DISCUSS UNIVERSITY
- QBLEMS *
Prominent alumni of the University
will gather for their annual confer-
ence on November 10 intsead of hold-
ing the meeting during the spring
term as has been the practice in the
fpst. Those attending will be the
guests of the Union at luncheon and
diner at that time and will also see
the Marine football game.
4rhe conference Is to be of an in-
ftrmal nature, but nevertheless will
bear some resemblance, in purpose at
loost, to the meetings of the board of
yisitors at other universities and col-
lgges. General University problems
#l1l be considered by those in attend-
ace. Between 45 and 50 alumni who
bave succeeded in their particular line
o; work have signified their intention
f accepting the invitation sent out
by President Burton and more are e-
pected to do so.f
tJnion Rooms All
Taken By Alumni
Not only is the Athletic association
swamped by a deluge of requests for
football tickets for the big games of
the fall, but the Union is in some-
thing of the same position because of
he thousands of requests that come
.*'from Alumni members of the Uin-
+in for bed room accommodations on
the week-ends of the games, This
year's demand is unprecedented, ac-
eording to Homer Heath, general man-
ager of the Union. All of the Union's
rooms were given to Alumni members
in the order of application, and by
Iast Aug. 15, the supply of rooms for
the week-ends of the Ohio State, Ma-
rine and Minnesota games was com-
pletely exhausted. The requests are
continuing to come in with steadily
ipcreasing volume as the date of thE
games draws nearer, but there is noth-
Ing for officials to do except to state
that it is Impossible to Aneet the
requests.
The applications for accommoda-
tion at the Union form a good barom-
eter of how widely the Alumni plan
to attend this year's games, and prac-
tically every state in the United States
is numbered among those whose cit-
Ilens are coming back to Ann Arbor
'.is fall.
Jighway Engineering Depart. 1 iMove
With the completion of the engin-
eering shops, the department of high-
way engineering will move to that

Katherine Wick Kelley
Miss Katherine Wick' Kelley, whe
has come from the Cleveland Play-
house to take the leading role in Mich-
.gan Repertory Theater plays for this
season will have the part of Mrs.
Baxter in "The Mollusc," a comedy by
Hubert Davies to be presented Satur-
day night. Some time ago George Ar-
liss and Emily Stevens appeared in
the same play when Miss Stevens was
cast in the leading part.
TOu MEET TONIGHT
New Body May Act on Freshman
Discipline and Other Ques-
tions
SUBORDINATE GROUP MAY BE
PICKED TO IIANDLE )ETAILS
Members of the Student council will
meet at 7 o'clock tonight at the Union
for the first regular 'council meeting
of the year. This year's Student
council, organized last spring under,
the new student government plan, is
composed of nine seniors and three
,juniors, representing the student body,
the managing editor of The Daily, the
president of the Union and the cap-
tain of the football team. John W.
Kelly, '24L, is president of the coun-
cil for this year.
This body was elected last spring in
a special campus election when the
nine representatives from the senior
and junior classes were chosen. Sevy-
eral meetings were held before school
closed in June in preparation for the
work of this year which will actively
begin at the meeting tonight.
The problems which immediately?
confront the council, including fresh-
'nan discipline and the organization of
some subordinate body to assist the!
council in its detail work, will prob-
ably be brought up for consideration
tonight. Further organizatiion within
the council will also probably take
place.

FITCH CRITICIZES
UNIVERSITIES FOR
WRONGEIMPHASIS
DEPLORES TENDENCY TO STRESS
SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC
ADVANTAGES
BURTON PAYS GR EAT
TRIBUTE TO SPEAKER
To Address Students This Afternoon
on "Leading the Crowd or
Following It"
Declaring that the universites of
this country, because of their empha-
sis on the wrong things in education
were failing in their obligation of
turning out thinkers of trained and
disciplined minds, Dr. Albert Parker
Fitch who spoke last night in Hill
auditorium under the auspices of the
Students Christian assocaion, urged
his hearers to a sense of their moral
obligation to be intellectual, and the
great need today of honest courageous
thinkers.
President Marion L. Burton, in com-
menting upon the speech last night
said,
"If the students of the Universty are
as wise as we think they are, Hill
auditorium will be packed to the doors
at 5 o'clock this afternoon to hear Dr
Albert Parker Fitch. Those who heard
hin3 last night know why I say this
These addresses are among the rares
treats of a year full of good things
You cannot afford to let this chance
go by."
Dr, Fitch is one of the leading re-
ligious workers in the country whose
sities and speak to the young men and
mission it is to go out to the univer-
young women of those institutions.
His address, "The Moral Obligation to
be Intellectual" was an appeal to his
hearers to "throw off the intellectual
irresponsibility ,the mental indiffer-
ence, the moral indolence that they
had acquired and to learn to love
truth for truth's sake, to think clearly
and concisely and to accept in fact
their great moral obligation to be in-
tellectual."
Speaking to the audience person-
ally he said, "You have brought your-
self to Ann Arbor, but what did you
come for? You have brought yourself
to a great tax supported institution,
where all the treasures of knowledge
are stored. Your first moral obliga-
tion is to cultivate an honest mind.
The duty of the University should be
to create in you character, and char-
acter begins in an honest and clear
mind. Character is not clean living or
respectable living, but it is intellect-
ual integrity, honesty and coura.ge."
The speaker then denounced the
present system of education. "We
1make education exist for another
thing. We should train minds that
can lead the affairs of a great repub-
lic. But we stress the social and econ-
omi'c parts of life. We hope that ed-
ucation will pace us in a higher stra-
Ita of society
This afternoon at 5:00 o'clock in
Hill auditorium. Dr. Fitch will
speak on "Inherited or Acquired Re-
ligion." and Thursday ,vening, he
will speak on "Leading the Crowd or
Following It."

ATTEMPT TO PURCHASE "1"
SWEATER CHAGRINS FROSH
I Ambition is a. great thing. At
least this is what one freshman
on the campus now believes who
so liked the appearance of a
Ivarsity football "M" sweater that
he calmly walked into George
Moe's shop and asked if he
might buy one. At the refusal
his disappointment was great but
it all goes to show that a grey
pot and a green look can't keep
a man of ambition from at least
trying for the .thing he wants
when he wants it.
ELECTIONS CANBE
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY SET ASIDE
FOR ALTERATION OF
SCHEDULES
UPPERCLASSMEN TO CONSULT
IN REWISTRAR'S OFFICE
Changes in elections in the literary
college may be made tomorrow and
Friday in University hall as is the
usual custom. According to Registrar
Arthur G. Hall, only those students
who have legitimate excuses for
changing their course may do so with-
out paying a fine of $1.
Juniors and seniors desiring to re-
arrange their courses should call at the
registrar's office in University hall on
either of the two allotted days. Fresh-
men and sophomoires may make chang-
es in the auditorium of that building.
Only in cases where faculty mem-
bers have changed hours for lectures
and quiz sections or where thereare
conflicts may elections be changed
without the usual fine. Or as Regis-
trar Hall expresses it, "No student
may change elections just because he
or she desires a blonde instructor in-
stead of a brunette."
After this week all those who must
make changes must consult Dean Wil
bur R: Humph'reys' and secre the
signatures of their instructors.
192 WORLD'S 'SERIES TO
OPEN AT YANK STADIUMI~
New York, Sept. 25.-(By A.P.)-The
1923 World's series will open on Wed-
nesday Oct. 10, at the Yankee stadium,
home of the third time American
league champion and greatest baseball
park in the country, regardless of
whether the New York Giants or the
Cincinnati Reds win the fight to rep-
resent the national league.
This was decided today at a meeting
of local club officials with Commis-
sioner Kenesaw M. Landis, when Col-
Jacob Ruppert, owner of the New
York Yankees, won the toss to decide I
which league should have the honors
of opening the series.
Should the Giants stand off the
eleventh hour challenge of the Reds
and take the pennant, thus making thet
series an all metropolitan affair for
the third successive time, the games
will alternate between the Yankee
stadium and the Polo grounds.
In the event that Cincinnati upsets
calculations and wins the flag by "a
miracle" finish, the first two games
will be played in the Yankee stadium
and the next two at Redland field,
with a probable lapse of a day for the
shifting of battle fields.
YOST RETURNS T0,11AY
roMf EASTERN TRIP

Coach Fielding 11. Yost and Mrs.
Yost are expected to return to Ann
Arbor from New York today. Mrs.
Yost, who has been spending the sum-
mer month" in Europe, arrived in
New York yesterday aboard the Levia-
than, which was a day late due to
heavy fogs.
Coach Yost left Ann Arbor on his
way East last Friday night, stopping
off in Cleveland Saturday to attend
the dedication of the new Big Ten club
headquarters that night.
BE YOURSELF!!
How are you fixed on eats? Jimmie
has located several fine eating places
which need boarders. He has also
fotnd many hungry students looking

TROOPS READY TO
PREVENT MEETING
OF LEGISLATURE
GOVERNOR WALTON SUPPORTED
IN STAND BY 35,000
VOLUNTEERS
NATIONAL AID MAY BE
USED IF NECESSARY
Guardsmen Units Enter Oklahoma
City; To Be Ready For
Immediate Call
Oklahoma City, Okla., Sept. 25.-
(By A. P.)-Thirty five thousand men
in the state have volunteered in the
Oklahoma national guard during the
legislative crisis, Gov. J. C. Walton
announced here tonight.
The executive made it plain, that he
anticipated no necessity for calling the
volunteers to duty.
Troops Called
Another unit of guardsmen will be
brought to Oklahoma City tomorrow to
aid the troops already here in block-
ing the called session of the legisla-
ture at noon, the governor added. Be-
cause of the military censorship over
troop movements Governor Walton de-
clined to say what units had been
called.
Appeals for National Aid
President Coolidge and Attorney
General Daugherty were appealed toj
tonight by Gov. J. C. Walton to use
their office to prevent members of the
lower house of the Oklahoma legisla-
ture from convening tomorrow in any
federal building in the state.
COMMANDER .DEPICTS
HONDA CATASTROPHE,

Ends Resistance!

Prizes Offered for Best Designs;
Be Used in All Cities
Throughout Tour

To

Gustav Stresenmnn,
Gustav Strese ian, Chancellor of
Germany, yesterday gave the order
which ends the moral resistance of
his people to the occupation by the
French in the Ruhr. An immediate re-
sumption of work is expected and.
Premier Poincare of France will, it
is thought, relax the occupation some-
what.
OPERA WILL HOLD
POSTER CONTEST,

CAPTAIN WATSON ASSUMES
RESPONSIBILITY IN
COURT TESTIMONY

ALL

Enrollment Figures Grow As
Many Late Arrivals Register

SEPARTIST MOVE
FEARED AS RUHR
RESISTANGEENDS
FRETCH WATCh POSSIBILITY
OF BAVARIA-REICH
SPLIT
ALLIES TO PRACTICE
HANDS-OFF POLICY
Thought To Be Direct Result of Ruhr
Controversy; Debate Return
of Prisoners
Paris, Sept. 25.-(By A. P.)-The
political situation in Germany as the
aftermath of the decision, to abandon
passive resistance in the Ruhr is being
watched by the French government
with sore anxiety in view of the
possibility of a natonalist movement;
such as one tending to separate Ba-
varia from the Reich, the outbreak of
mild bolshevism, in Prussa and fresh
impetus to the separatist movement
in the Rhineland. Should serious dis-
turbance of any sort arise in the rest
of Germany it is thought they would
most certainly have the result of in-
creasing the number of Rhinelanders
desirng to assure continuation of
their tranquility by separation.
No Interference
The allied troops, it is asserted in
official circles, will not be allowed to
take sides in any conflict as, in the
absence of other military force, re-
sponsibility rests upon them for the
maintenance ofoorder in the occupied
territories. There is good reason for
the conclusion that the French attri-
bute lttle importance to the separate
movement just formed, but that they
will not intervene to prevent the in-
habitants from taking any action they
see fit so long as order is not dis-
turbed.
Violent Outbreaks
In the event that the cessation of
passives resistance is not attended by
violent outbreaks, the allies will, it is
assumed, be faced at once with the
necessity of providing for a new
region of occupation. The hypothe-
sis is that the industrial leaders of
the Ruhr, freed from the restrictive
decree of the Berlin governnent, will
repeal the promises made.
Germany to Request
It is anticipated that the German
government pending final terms of
payment of reparations will ask that
the expelled finctionaries be allowed
to return to the Ruhr, that the im-
prisoned industrial magnates includ-
ing Dr. Krupp von Bohlen be released
and that the rigors of the occupation
be lessened.
Information gleaned from oflcial
circles indicates there will be no
strong objection to ;a change in the
occupational region and that the
French government is quite willing to
r.. it as far as possible of its disa-
greeable features. The return of the
German functionaries, however, is a
more serious matter, since most o
them are Prussians, and it is feared
by the allies that they are likely to
raise new forms of obstruction.
PEL1IN TO TEACH NEW
SAROUITEICUI L COURSE
NEWl FACULTY ME3UBER TO LEAD
CLASSI iN l1RATE

San Diego, Cal., Sept. 25.-(By A. P.)
A; tale of the Honda disaster told by
the. destroyer squadron 'commander
who, two weeks ago, saw seven of his
ships imperilled on the rocks and 23
of his men go down to their (heath
took up today's session of the naval
court of enquiry, investigating the
wreck.
Capt. Edward H. Watson,. chief of
the eleventh squadron, was the com-
mander who told the story and in it
he took upon himself full responsi-
bility for the catastrophe.
Presiding members of the investiga-
tion body asked him to state whether'
he had ever objected to his division
commanders asking independently for
radio compass bearings with which to
check their squadron commander's
navigation, or whether he had ever ob-
jected to their taking surroundings
for the purpose of making sure that
the flagship was right in its reckoning
To these questions Capt. Watson
answered that he had never objected
to such independent activities. Under
cross examination Captain Watson
followed up his answer by saying that
surroundings could not have been
taken while the squadron was travel-
at 20 knots.
INTERNATIONAL BALLOON
R ACE FATAL TO FIVE
Brussells, Sept. 25.-(By A. P.) The
international balloon race for the
Gordon Bennett cup developed into an
international disaster. Already five
men have lost their lives and no fewer
than six balloons were destroyed or
badly damaged. Lieutenants Olmstead
and Shoptaw, of the U. S. army bal-
loon F-6 are among those who per-
ished, but the U. S. Navy A-6699 made
a safe landing at Puppen, Holland.
Some of the contestants have not
been heard from. They may have
escaped the fury of the storm or metI
the samn fate as the British balloon
]Marguerite, the latest to be reported,I
which fell into the sea off Denmark.
CHEMISTS TO MOVE
IN NEXT MONTH
Prof. A. H. White, head of the chem-
ical engineering department, states
that his department will be entirely
moved into the new engineering build-
ing within one month. The only lab-
oratories that will be delayed in mov-
I ing are the gas laboratories and those

MEN ENTERING TO MEET
FOR INSTRUCTIONS TODAY
Competition for the supplying of a
poster for the 1924 Union opera will
be thrown open this week. A prelim-
inary meeting of the men who desire
to submit designs will be held at 5
o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the
Mimes theater, when K. Mortimer
Shuter will explain what is needed in
the poster.
A contest will be held, and for the
best and second best poster designs,
prizes will be given. The first prize
will be a cash prize of $10, while the
second prize will be two tickets at
one of the performances of the opera
when it plays in Ann Arbor.
The poster is more or less of a
trade mark for the opera. It is usedF
in -all of the bill board advertising of
the show, and is posted in front of all
of the theaters in which the opera
plays. The design also appears on the
front-page of all of the programs and
musical scores.
After the meeting tomorrow, the en
trants in the poster contest will he
given a number of days to get ready
the posters which they desire to sub-
mit, and then the matter will be played
in the hands of the judges for decis-
ALTER PUBLIC SPEAING
FACULT'S__PERSONNEL
Three changes have been madei
the faculty of the public speaking de-
partment following the departure of[

Little change in the total number of
students enrolled in all colleges in the
University was noted last night, al-
though a small number of persons
continued to appear after 4he closing
of officiol. registration on Monday.
The total number is now 8,578, in-
cluding estimates in several colleges
where the number has not been count-
ed, or 124 more than were enrolled on
'he day previous.
This is 515 more students than were
enrolled at this, time last year or
within 50 of the total number regis-
tered up to Nov. 1 in 1922, uifter mnost
of the late registrants had signed up.
Registrar Arthur G. Hall said yester-
day that about 80 new arrivals had
been listed in the literary college dur-
ing the dayj bringing the total in that
school up to 4,862. He predicted that
(luring this week and the next, regis-
tration would gradually fall off as the
students unable to return earlier stop
enrolling.
The number in the College of Engi-
neering and Architecture grew to 1728
with 20 signing up yesterday. At this
time last year 1759 had entered.
Enrollment in the medical school

had been listed, a decrease of four
over last year's count. The School of
Education reports the largest enroll-
ment in its history with 231 entering.
Enrollment in the graduate school last
night reached 294 with 58 students
registering yesterday. .
All persons who registered without
legitimate excuses paid fines of $5.
This same rule applies to all students
enrolling from now on.
NEWYOK COMBINA9TION
WPAPER TOOBESIZE'
New York, Sept. 25.-(By A. P.)
Publisher's association officials ar-
ranged tonight to double the s:ze of
New York's combined morning news-
papers to 1e pages tomorrow. as the
striking pressmen remained idle and
George L. Berry, president of the In-
ternational union asserted union
strikemen from other cities were ar-
riving in response to his appeal for
men to fill the vacancies.

cording to Prof. Thomas C. True- DEIGN
blood, head of that department.
E. E. Fleischman, who taught last F. G. Pelikan, a graduate of the
year at the University of Kentucky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
took up his work yesterday as an in_ has joined the faculty of the architec-
structor of public speaking, taking the i ural college. Mr. Pelikan who has for
place of Mr. Wilner who is now teach- the past three years been director of
ing in Fairmount college at Wichita, the Grand Rapins school of art and
Kan industry will be an instructor in draw-
Lionel Crocker, an assistant in the ing and painting.
department last year, will become an A new course which will be known
instructor, taking the place of Carl as "Decorative Design'" will be given
Brandt, who is now practicing law in by Mr. Pelikan. An announcement of
Milwaukep, Wis. the course, which was arranged too
J. S. Gray who is on a leave of abs- late to be included in the bulletin of
once from Gustavus Adolphus college the college, follows:
in Minnesota, will become a teaching { "The aim of the course is to apply
assistatn in the department. Ile is the principles of design in the field of
now doing work for a master's de- advertising design, stagecraft, and
gree. pageantry, woodblock engraving and
printing, typography, fashion illustra-
tion, and pcister design.
Ticket Allotment "The problems assigned will include
1 the use of pencil, pen, and ink, wat-
For Ohio Game Cut
oercolor, tempera pastel, oil, and var-
ions combinations of these mediums.

Students may now obtain only one
ticket to the Ohio State game apiece.
This means that the additional two
tickets that have been allowed here-
tofore can no longer be secured. This

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EDITORIAL TRYOUTS WANTED
Several staff positions are open

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