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October 23, 1923 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-10-23

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I

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1923

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

- i

,V
E S:

PROFESSOR TELLS
HISTORY OF TUT"
Discovery Important As Revealer Of
Historical Events
Of Period
AMERICAN FURNISHED MONEY
FOR CONTINUATION OF WORK

News From Other Colleges

Oregon - Sophomores annexed the
honors it an underclass war held re-
cently. Many valiant attempts by the
G men of '27 to dislodge their opponents
from their entrenched position around
their class flag were in vain, although
at one time it looked as though the
sophomore flag was down. The pres-
ident of the class of '26 was carried
off by the freshmen.

Ohio State-Five candidates

have

Urges British
To Inflate

Money

been disqualified in the recent senior
elections. Violation of rules was the
charge against them, although the
candidates themselves declared that
they were not guilty. Posters adver-
tising their candidacy were found
tacked up in several of the University
buildings.
A new election may be necessary if

. I

E

Stress upon the importance of the
discovery of the tomb of King Tut-
Ankh-Amen should be emphasized for
the light it has thrown upon the his-
torical, religious and artistic facts of
the period in which he lived, accord-
ing to M. Alexandre Moret, professor
of the "College de France" in his illus-
trated lecture on "Sepulchre de Tout-
ankhamon" yesterday.
History Related
Since this has been unearthed in the
Valley of the Kings it is known fromj
the documents found that Amenophis
LV, the father of Tut-Ankh-Amen and
founder of the 15th dynasty of kings,
attempted to instill new ideas into the
minds of his people and new practices
into their daily life.
This, however, was only effective
during his reign and that of his son
and successor, Tut-Ankh-Amen.
The latter was persecuted unmerci-
fully by his religious enemies, his pal-
ace was looted of its most precious
possessions, and the capital moved
back to Thebes. Thus it can not be
ascertained definitely whether this is
in reality the tomb of Tut-Ankh-Amen
or merely his store-house.
The interest which the unearthing
of this tomb aroused was in no way
warranted from the point of view of
those who thought it a new enterprise,
but is exceptional and extraordinary
only when regarded as enlightening
the present generations on the his-
tory of the Egypt of his dynasty, M.
Moret said.
Early Discoveries Made
Discoveries of some of these tombs
z were made as early as 1500 to 1000 B.
C. and in 950 B. C. they were known
in a general way. Between 1875 and
1895 mummies and furniture were
found in the valley of Kings by a
Frenchman but the work was sus-
pended on account of earthquakes and
a phortage of money.
Theodore Davis, an American, furn-~
ished money between 1903 for the
continuation of the work, found Am-
enophis 4th and believed that the
treasures of the Valley of Kings had
been exhausted, Lord Ca'navan how-
ever, proceeded with the excavating
and in 1922 came upon the tomb and
mummy of King Tut-Ankh-Amen,
which, Professor Moret said, is but a
logical sequence to the former search.
?HIe gave much credit to the work of
k Howard Carter and his American as-
sociates, as well as to the aforemen-
a mtioned men.
M. Moret is an authority on Egypt-
ology and internationally known for
his interest in and books on the sub-
ject.

tLile complaints are recognized.
Wisconsin-A "hobo" parade held
as a feature of the Homecoming, Sat- Princeton-All members of the class
urday, added much to the merriment of '26 were required to take a psychol-
of all the spectators. The most im- ogical test given under the direction
portant part of the parade was the of a special committee of the faculty
awarding of prizes, which were of recently. This test was-compulsory
all descriptions. One of the prizes for for all sophomores as is is thought by
the longest beard was a complete per-) the committee in charge that a stu-
sonal renovating, including shave, dent may be better able to choose his
hair-cut, shampoo and tonic. Idepartments and elecives for his jun-

AlUMNI SECRETARY WILL'
VISITGRAU CLUBS
Hawley .Tapping, '16L, field secre-
tary of the Alumni association of the
University of Michigan, will leave to-
morrow for a trip through the central
portion of the state to meet with the
various alumni clubs.
Leaving tomorrow evening, he will
arrive in Alpena on Thursday and ad-
dress an alumni banquet held there in
connection with the district meeting of
the Michigan State Teachers' associa-
tion.
Bay City will be visited on Friday.
On Saturday he will be in Alma and
will hold a conference with the promi-
nent alumni of the Alma-Ithaca dis-
trict in regard to the formation of a
club in that section of the state.
Professor Defends
Coffee Drinking
"Coffee is a beverage which, if prop-
erly prepared and rightly used, gives'
comfort and inspiration, augments
mental and physical activities and
may be regarded as the servant rath-
er than the destroyer of civilization."
This was the sweeping reply to those
who have been attacking coffee, of
Prof. Samuel C. Prescott df the Mas-
sachusetts Institute of Technology.
As head of the department of biol-
ogy and public health of Massachus-
etts Tech., Professor Prescottt has
had direct supervision of three years
of scitntific research on the subject
which cost $40,000 to make. His con-
clusion is based upon these experi-
mnents.
BAND HEARS CONCERT
Members of the Varsity Band were
guests of the School of Music at the
concert given by the Sousa band last
night at Hill auditorium. The 80
members of tge band attended the
concert given by this master band
leader in a body.

Light Comedies
To Open Season
For Players Club
With every prospect of duplicatingt
their successes of last year, Playerst
club will give their opening perform-
ance tomorrow night in Sarah Caswell-
I Angell hall.
The program will include two com-
edies by eminent modern playwrights.
"The Trysting Place", by Booth Tark-
ington is an extremely light, rollink-
ing affair filled with the most laugh-
able and ludicrous of situations.
Rachel Crothers' "What They Think"
is a humorous presentation of the
"modern girl", with all her fancies
and foibles.
The cast of "The Trysting Place" in-
cludes: Eleta Seeley, '26; Warren
Parker, '26, Florence Nelson, '25, Ern-
estine Roe, ,24, Clifford DeLong, '24,
George Miller, and R. Wendall
Brown. It is directed by Stacy Black,
'24, president of the club.
The players in "What They Think"
will be: Jack Hassberger, '23, Dor-
othy Bolton, '25, Mrs. Mary I. Mc-
Eachern, special, and Donald O. Cook,
'24. The play is under the direction
i of Mary Noble, special, and June
Knisely, '25, who scored so heavily in
a Comedy club production a week ag.
Mr. Brown, who appears in the first
play, played the leading part in "Mr.
Pim Passes By" when it was given
some time. ago by the University of
Hawaii.
The leading man from last years
play, "The Mandarin Coat", Donald
Cook, will take part in Rachel Cro-
thers' comedy.
Admission will be collected at the
door. Holders of membership cards
will be admitted free as usual.
MAY REMIT, PROBATIONE
SENTENCEON STUDENT'
Professor William H. Hobbs of the
geology department, stated yesterday
that he would petition the central com-
mittee on discipline to remit the pro-
bation inflicted upon a student for un-
becoming conduct in a session on Oct.
18. He will take this action, he said,
because the committee was unanimous
in acqultting the student of the charge
which he had preferred against him
although he had been found guilty of
unbecoming condut.
He further stated that, he believed
that if certain "mitigating circum-
stances" which modified the penalty
imposed, were warranted, that he
could not regard the student's con-
duct as unbecoming but rather as de-
serving of commendation for consid-
erable forbearrance under provocation
"when by every consideration he was
entitled to kindly and sympathet:c
treatment."
ADELPHI TO HOLD
STRIKE DEBATE
Adelphi House of Representatives
will meet at 7:30 o'clock tonight in the
Adelphi room on the fourth floor of
University hall. There will be a num-
ber of short speeches by members and
tryouts.
The subject of the evening's debate
will be "Resolved, That the United
States should enact a law, giving to
strikes . and their concomitant activ-
ities the same legality that they are
given under the English Industrial
Disputes Act of 1906 (Constitutionali-
ty Granted)."
Visitors, especially freshmen who
are interested in debating, are invit-
ed to attend.
Commerce Club to See Play
Chamber of Commerce club mem-
bers will hold a luncheon at noon to-
day at the Chamber of Commerce inn.

The officers of the Women's club will
be guests and the dramatic depart-
ment of the club will give a one act
play entitled, "Aunt Susan's ure for
Indifference."
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson of the Eng-
lish department in the engineering
college, is to be chairman of the
gathering.
Mexico City. Oct. 22.-(By A.P-

I

Taming those
blooming whiskers

l'11th

HAVE a clean, cool shave-
quick 1 You need more than
lather and a sharp razor. The
keenest blade grows dull and pulls
unless you use a supple, pliable
shaving brush whose bristles have
just the correct degree of stiffness
to massage your beard.

for and senior years with the knowl-
edge of his records in the test.
Cornell - The university trustees
have just passed a new regulation
departments and electives for his jun-
dents withdrawing from the university
for reasons satisfactory to the comp-
troller and registrar.
Patronize The Daily Advertisers.

Sir Montague Barlow
Sir Montague Barlow, British min-
ister of labor, declared in a recent
speech that the plan for inflating cur-
r ency by 100,000,000 pounds in Eng-
land, as put forward by the chairman

O
f
O
DOWN TOWN.

BASSC
An ideal hunting or hik-
ing shoe in 14 or 16-inch
top. Price $13 and $14.50.
Wahr's Shoe Store

I

Il

I

108 S. MAIN

------

...

,in M
Cigar
racy
whic]
tires.

I

I

[E constant)
noker finds
[elachrino
ettes a deli-
of flavor of
h. he never

i

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