100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 20, 1923 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PALL 'FOvit

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20; 1923

i r

--

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF . THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Poard in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
,tled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwisec
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
Michigani, as second tdlass' matter.
Subscription by carier, $3.5o; by mail,
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard 'Street. '-
Thdnes: Editorial, 24r4 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, y96o.
S dcommunications, not exceeding 300
wordswill be published in The IDaily at
the discretion of the Editor. Upon request,
the identity of communicants will be re-
garded as confidential.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
HOWARD A.DONAHUE
News Editor.............Julian E. Mack
City Editor..................Harry l iey
Editorial Board Chairman. ..R. C. Moriarty
Night Editors
E. H. Ailes A. 11. Connable
R. A. Billingt*on . 1%. Fiske
Harry C. _a rk , G. Garlinghouse
P. M. Wagner
Spoits Editor..............Ralph N. Byers
Women's Edit(.............,Winona H-ibbard
Telegraph Editor... ........R. B. Tarr
Sunday Magazine Editor... .V. L. Tilden
Music Editor............. Ruth A Howell
Assistant City Editor......Kenneth C. Kellar
Editorial Board

MIN-NIYtG FOR MICHIIGAN
In the light of rumors which became
current yesterday many enthusiastic
followers of the Wolverines are ex-
pecting to see Coach Fielding H. Yost
make his formal departure from active
participation in gridiron affairs today.
To those who admire the great men-
tor as the finest man in American ath-
letics it will be nothing of a surprise
to hear that "Hurry Up" Yost will re-
main with his "boys" as a teacher and
leader until the end of his days. His1
ixitention of resigning is no more than
an interesting bit of fiction, cooked up
by newspapermen who anticipated
just a bit too much.
The fighting men who take the of-
fensive against Ohio State this after-
noon are as much the product of
Coach Yost's tutelage as any eleven
that has taken the field for Michigan
in over twenty years. Each succeed-
ing team which strives to win for
Micligan will likewise show the
marks of the one who leads them all
as a coach. The work of teachers who
have mastered their art and the art
of "getting it across" are never for-
gotten.
As a battle which will test the'
strength of a'mighty team, the game
today is being watched from coast to
coast. The team is the focus point for
the eyes of thousands. They are not
all, however. Over 30,000 Men of1
Michigan will take their places in the
stands today. Eleven will be one the
field fighting for the honor of the mul-
titude. The Coach will take his post-
tion on the sidelines, the supreme fig-f
ure of all. Show him and his "boys"
that you are there and standing firmly
behind him.
THE CLEMENTS LIBRARY

d/dH1H/HIH///MlI/H/HGLH/NH! //1/1

i

Fill. M

PASTED RAY
' ' ' WE'LL
BE
DOGGONED!
WE were just beginning
that there was only one pers
campus that wrote contribu
could enjoy. And it was int
cal mood that we arrived at1
yesterday afternoon, and lI
the hook where our mail is h
day. What did we see? W
was a lot of stuff, but that d
us. We said Heh Heh very
indeed and yanked the stu
hook. And we will say it's
we've seen in one-in a lo
Furthermore, we know onlyo
persons that wrote it.
THE YELLOW PER
To keep my bones from ac
pain
When I go walking in th
I wear a yellow slicker
The damned thing warps..
my knees
And gets my goat by sl
grees.
(Observers, curse them,
er)
Tho' women's clothingo
witches,
I understand their trend
britches.
Thus does my yellow:
And yet a slicker has a
Its soul gives off a' flavo
Its nature to my nostrils
The smell of fish (and
things).
My lovely yellow slick
Jno. P

to think
on on the
utions we
this cyni-
the Office
ooked 'at
ung every
Tell, there
idn't fool
cynically
ff off the
the best
ng while.
one of the
IL

EDITORIAL COMMENT

Mr. Lloyd George's Speech
(Chicago Daily Tribune)
Mr. Lloyd George's address at Dex-
ter pavilion was a very temperate and
carefully delimitated discussion of the
European situation, the Ruhr and re-
parations and the proposal of Secre-
tary Hughes for a commission to de-
termine Germany's capacity to pay.
The speech kept the level of a busi-
ness proposition and there was no at-
tempt at rhetorical appeal. We were
not told that we ought for the sake
of humanity to enter the league of na-
tions or the world court, so called, or
that we must cast our great influence
into the scale of peace for the salva-
tion of civilization. We think it will
have the greater effect upon the rank
and file of Americans for that rea-'

AM
AI)v ff
Ija Ive elk

sea

At Grahamn's

T "wo Stores

!%.-NM MM M 111:11 lillial I 1 11

wm

NMI ILI

cimens showing the different stages
of the manutacture of para rubber to
the chemical museum of the Univer-
sity.

Read dTlieDaily "Cla sified" Columns

It's true efficiency to
Classifieds.-Av.

use Daily

Cosy Corner Tea Room
Serves Well Cooked Home Food

Paul Einstein

R. G. Baetcke
Marion Barlow
Il . erkmnan
1 elen Brown
Bernadete Co
G, W. Davis
Harold Ehrlich
. Fingerle
P.Henry
Dorothy Karni
Joseph Kruger
t'lizabetli ,iel:
R. R. McGrego

Robert Ramsay
Andrew Propper
Assistants
D'J. McGinnis
v S. Mansfield
S E. C. M ack
Verena Moran
to Regina Reichnann
S. L. Smith
It W. II. Stoneman
e TT. R. Stop!
K. E. Stycr
n N. R. Thal
S.eB. Tremble
errnan W. J. Waltimour

Or, Jr.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
LAURENCE H. FAVROT
Advert ising.................E. L. Dunne
Advertising .............. Perry -l. Hayden
Advertising......................C. Purdy
Advertising..................W..W. Roesser
Advertising ................W. K. Scherer
Accou'ts ...................C. W . Christie!
Circulation...................Jno. IHaskins
Publication ............,.Lawrence Piercej
Assistants{
Bennie Caplan Harold A.kMarks
John Conlin Biyrn Parker-
Alin B. Cr-ouch S. A. Robinson
L ois M. Dexter H. M. Rockwell {
Joseph J. Finn H1. E. Rose
bavid A. Fox Will Weise
Lauren Tfaiaht C. F. White
R. E. Hawkinson R. C. Winter
Edw. D. Hoedemaker
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1923 j
Night Editor-J. G. GARLINGHOUSE
- THE SCALPiNG DISGRACE
The Athletic association ye Aterday
apprehended wlhat they have every'
reason to believe is a scalper, but the
amount of evidence is insufficient toI
convict him. This man is a student,j
but only one of the large number ofj
such undesirable students who use
such an opportunity as this to breakr
the law, to cheat their University, and
to fleece their fellow students. While
this man cannot be made to pay thet
full penalty of the law for his Un-f
doubtedly criminal action, the Athleticr
association has placed his name on itOj
blacklist and henceforth, during his
stay at Michigan, he will be allowed(
no more than one ticket for any ath-I
letic contest of the University.
Such action can not be too severe-
ly dealt with. Men who make a prac-t
tice of preying upon the loyalty of
their fellow students and the alumnir

Returning alumni have the oppor-
tunity of visiting the Clement's Libra-
ry this morning. The beauty of the '{n-
terior and the remarkable collections
of manuscripts will be a surprise to
these who have not yet seen them.
Another fact should be called to theirj
attention.
This valuable addition to the uni-
versity is a private gift, being donat-
ed by Regent William L. Clements.,
The field for gifts of such beauty and
lasting value to the university is ui-
limited.
YESTERDAYI
,By SMYTHE
"God Gh ci ImUsen",-
"Democracy" says Mr. L 1 o y dj
George, "produces great men at need,{
whereas autocracy cannot." There isk
some truth in the statement. TheI
French Revolution produced Napo-
feon; the English Puritan Revolution
brought forth Cromwell; in our own
country we got a Washington and a
Lincoln when they were badly needed.
The trouble with accepting the
great English statesman's generality
however, lies in the fact that the
vague term democracy connotes so
many different th ngs. Like the whitei
robe of charity, democracy covers a
multitude of sins. Governments that
operate through so much red tape that
the voice of the people is lost in the'
maze are. nominally democracies. Gov-r
ernments that foster party politics
to the verge of destructiveness are
democracies to some.. Even govern-
ments that shackle and discourage the
individual are sometimes called dem-
ocracies.
Any system that gives free rein toI
the individual as far as the line that
separates law and order from lawless-
ness and disorder is rightly called a

BIBLE SUPPLY IS
SMALL; FEW LEF
-Head in the Ti
It seems to us that it's tim
edition of this great work w
gotten out.
Dear Jason:
My soul is like a birdie,
A winging South at Fall.
My neck's A little dirdie;
A SWIMMING POOL for
De
* ~**
WAS WASHINGTON A
RIGHT? inquires the Daily
Well, was they?
,We have somehow x-slai
terday's Free Press, But som
I us that it recorded that Brow
sity was celebrating the birt
graduate of the class of 142.
It's this hoary antiquity of
ern colleges that 'makes tht
place to learn algebra a
ness ad.
Dear Mr. Jason Cowles:
knit, but we'd like to contrib
is our offering.
We* wish we were a little
In chocolate then we'd pi
dip.
And then besides our '
chippy,
We'd naturally feel exi
dippy.
*Not the editorial we.
Very truly yo
Polly
* * *
ROLLS ENTERPRIS
There is one tradition on
pus that we'd like to see abo
Mnorrow. We feel most str
this subject-most strongly.
It'-isn't as if it was a g
Michigan tradition. We've
elsewhere. But it appears h
most virulent and revolting
We know of but one way to
this business effectively. T
tion is a remark that is ma
certain circumstances. Th
tion, when you come to it,
printed in black-faced type.
A young gent is walking w
Up comes another young g
says hello to one of the first
starts to walk along with 'e
the guy he said hello to says
I guess you don't know Bill
ven, do you?" And then T(
graciously to Mr. Beethovena
something we never could cat
then the other guy says, "Th
Kelly, Mr. Beethoven." And
says in a stronger voice, "Mig
to know you indeed, Mr. Beea
And then they walk alonga
about the 0. S. U. game.
Then Tom and the guy th
duced him to this Beethov
down a street, andsthis cheese
ven says "Well, nilghty glad t
ypu, Kelly." And silently Ke
every time, "Oh hell, het
to it.,
That's why we want this
abolished from the face ofth
It leaves you flat-absolutel

son.
he and What- Mr. Lloyd George did do was
to restate the British point of view on
e rain Ithe Ruhr and reparations, with which
.' a considerable section of American
around opinion coincides, and he expressers
emphatic approval of Secretary Hugh-
ow de-- es' plan. But it is evidence of Mr.
Lloyd George's acute perception that
snick- he did not suggest this proposal
should be urged again at this time.
He may wish that Mr. Coolidge do
oft be- that, but we believe he is right in rec-
ognizing that American opinion is not
toward favorable to any such experiment un-
der present conditions.
slicker. In fact, we believe there is a gen-
n ai; eral willingness in this country that
an raire. at a proper time, under proper condi-
brare. tions, our government should take
brings
other part in such a plan as Mr. Hughes
threw out as a polite suggestion. On
- the other hand,sthe good sense of An
erI' ericans teaches them that it would
anurge. be, useless to offer a plan already con-
spicuously ignored by one of the par-
ties whose interests are at stake. We
,New might be willing to act upon a com-.
nt Iission of expert inquiry or even to
undertake the responsibility of alone
Nas -beingdetermining German capacity to pay,
but not without invitation of all par-
ties concerned.
I Americans are not blind to the un-
happy state of Europe's affairs, far
from it. Americans realize fully their
A interest, material and moral, in Euro-
pean peace and restoration. L is not
esmonl necessary to depict Europe's misfor-
tunes over and over again, for the Am-
D LE erican press has done that and does
it day by day, and Americans read the
news, we suspect, more than any other
people, save perhaps the British. It
our yes- is the excited- partisan and the unin-
one toldI formed foreigner who imagine we are I
n univer-
not fully awake. The American policy
hday of. a of diplomatic inactions is not the pro-
educt of ignorance or indifference. It
the East- is the product on the contrary, of ob-
em better servation 'and deliberate conclusion.
nd buss- What we observe is a vast conflict of
interests, and what we conclude is
that it would profit us nothing to in-
We can't volve ourselves in it.
ute. Here A
America is not going to offer what,
despite all rhetorical protestations, Is
chip- not yet wanted by all principals in
robablyyy.rici.l i-
volved. America is not ready to as-
sume the responsibility of coercing
feeling any nation. If England and France
both want us to estimate Germany'sj
tremely capacity to pay, we most likely shall
be willing to do it. But not unless
We do. both want to and ask us to.
ars, ....,.,,,__
and SI.
E Twenty-Five Years
this cam- Ago At Michigan
lished to-
n1 nn

Attend the "UPPER ROOm"
BIBILE CLASS tibs evening
after the Grean, Gnme. [four
7 to 8 o'clock.
Join the hundreds hatt are;
trying it
A Sunday Mforning Session, also
at 9:3()
..A IDiffer-ent Lesson ..
"tpper Room"-Lane Hall
DI. lMIUATiA 11 1T
THE GREYSTONE
DINING ROOM
1030 E. University
Phone 991R
S'oda F~oumt:in Service
.1lilt (1" t Froul
S:30 to 11: ,() P. M.
DETROIT d' ED I.NES
FAST 1R0t A)
Limiteds: 6 a. il., 9:10 a. m. and
every tivo hours to 9:10 p. in.
Express: 7 a. m., 8 a. m, and every,
two hours to 8 p. in.
Locals: 7 a. in., 8:55 a. im. and
every two hours to 8:55 p. n.,
il p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:40
p. m., 12:25 a. m. and 1:15 a. mn.
IVEST DOUVNI)
Liimiteds: 8:47 a. in. and every two
hours to 8 :47 p. m.
Express (making local stops) : 9:50
a. in. and every two hours to 9:50
Locals: 7:50 a. in., 12:10 a. m.
LADRIAN-ANN ARBORII BUS iBE
Central ''ime (Slow lTillie)
Leave Chamber of Commerce
Week Days Sundays
6:45 a.m. 6:45 a.m.
12:45 EP. L T6:45T p.m.
4:45 P. m.
IiaS. i- ELLIOTT, Proprietor
Phone 926-M Adrian, Mice.

Daily

Luncheon
Dinner

- - - 12-1:30
- - - - 6-7:30

50c and 75c

UNIVERSITY MEN
ATTENTION!,

Roast Chicken Dinner
Every Saturday Night
330 MAYNARD STREET

=3l i D I l 9 ti i tliititDil til ttt!!#1(1111111 #1 111t 111t #1I li ttIL "
FINE HOT DINNERS
SATURDAY
AT
kW ILL3ITS
Din.ing Room and Banquet Hall open to the public. You can sit
o easy chairs, cross your feet under linen covered tables, and be
served with plping hot food in Ann Arbor's finest restaurant for 75c.
WILLITS THE CATERER
315 SOUTI-I STATE STREET PHONE 173
Special Sunday Dinner-12 to 2-$1.00
-e IIIIIIIIIIII1DID iDiIntll 111111111111l111I111111111tit11111#1111#1# IN#II11#1

'" - ". sreaa.a r. afr a.ee sM
ini \*yt
nt

. .. ......... ..n..."ti.w-.. "i.. u....,

L!

' OEN

AN'S

I-


j (.
I
i
''
' ,' ,
{ o
.'. :.
f :

BILLIARD, HALL
UP STAIRS

G07 CHURCH ST.

"DROP UP"

i :
I
I

("vras ................. AssYAYa . ....AA...........1/f!/////f~!flftf!lf~t//ff ttaa" _, ,M re
- I a

j

of their University certainly have no democracy. And Mr. Lloyd George is
place in an institution which is en- right in saying that such a system will
deavoring to develop the best qiali- produce the man of the hour when he
ties of character in its student body. is required.
It is doubtful if the policy of allowin- -
Nuch men even one ticket, is a wise During this week-end Michigan is
one, for, judging from their actions, trying to repay as far as possible the
their loyalty toward their University hospitality Ohio State showed at thej
is of such small moment as to be no Wolverine game in Columbus. This is
hindrance to their selling even their a good point for every Michigan man
one ticket for the highest price which to keep in mind at all times.
the necessity of our returning alumni
would permit them to exact. Ford is now about to take to the air.
It is to be expected that lawbreak- His venture on land was a peace fail-
ers, not connected with the University ure, his ocean launching could not
will gather together all the tickets bring peace to the world, and now he
they can at this time and dispose of is taking to the air, which should aint-
t'em to the highest bidder. There omatically start an aerial war.
-re all too many of that kind of per-
r'n in the world and even Ann Arbor The Union reading room is still suf-
Is not free from them. All the Ath- fering under the burden of hats and
1-tic association can do is to take coats which are carelessly scattered
every measure possible to insure t'e around on the furniture every day and
;pprehension and conviction of such from the unreplaced newspapers
i1,generates. When, however, we find which make the room look like a
choats of this kind within our own packing department.
:roud, sharing in the privileges A h * y
-' ant for decent people, no action can All the" seats at today's game must

l
,
,;
f
I
3'

o1 giy on
rand old
seen it
ere in its
form.
describe
he tradi-
de under
ie tradi-
will be
ith a pal.
gent and
two and
m. Then
"Oh Tom
Beetho-
om turns
and says
tch. And
is is Mr.
Tom then
ghty glad
chhofer."
and talk
at intro-
'en turn
Beetho-
o 'ye met
lly says,
beat be
remark
he earth.
yno re-

From the files of the U. of -1. Daily,
October 20, 1898.
Dr.-F. G. Novy has consenfed In
give a talk upon his trip to Russia,
dwelling particularly upon his visit
to the Fair at Nigni-Novgorod at tie
Ladies Library building Monday after-
noon. Dr. Novy's reputation as a lec-
turer, together with his peculiarly in-j
teresting subject insures an instrue-
tive and delightful hour. A cordial
invitation is extended to all.
Through the, generosity of the Hon.
Dexter M. Ferry of Detroit, a note-
worthy addition has just been made
to the Library. It consists of a very
full set of the originals of Matther
Arnold's works,including the x-
tremely rare volumes of 1849 (The
Strayed Reveller) and of 1852 (Emn-
pedocles on Aetna). The later of
these was withdrawn from circula-
tion by the author before 50 copies
were sold, and was reprinted only at
the solicitation of Robert Browning
15 years later. Among the rareilie s
are the Poems and other, now extinct
works. The cost of the entire set oft
19 volumes was $100.
Out of the 75 students who are doing
graduate work in the graduate school,
45 are members of the graduate club.r

Noonday I
Chop Sucy of

VA RSITY
INN.
512 E. WILLIAM
Try Our
Sundinners--5 Courses 85c
Daily Specials

Lunches
All 'Ind

S

:1_;_
f
1
f 4 '
....... I y t .
= '?
I

P

KILLYNESS-
- tland Calf
INTELAND CALF--a new
lether imported from
Sotland-a lt i r &
sturdiness unriatcht.
Workt into the KkLLY-
NESS it raakzs a shoe of
markt individuality for
the campus, class and
street. .ta 1&0

TAILORED AT FASHION FFK
Is the label that leads to your
suit and overcoat satisfaction
$45

up and down

Custom service without
the annoyance of a try-on
---Ready -to - Put - On

i

I-

;
s, a

I

m

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan