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October 11, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND PROBABLY
WARMER

AM-r

A6F
4Q,

vl p Iw

ASSOCIATED PRESS
LEASED WIRE SERVICE
0EMElR
WESTERN CONFERENCE
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATION

VOL. XXXIV. No. 16 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBERII 1, 1923 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE CENTS

f i

- ----r-

T

RESHMEN CLASES
ATHER TODAY FOR
ALL-CAMPUS MEET
FIRST YEAR MEN FROM ALL COL-
LEGES TO ASSEMBLE )N HILL
AUDITfO IiIVl
DENSMORE AND BURSLEY
TO REPRESENT FACULTY
Literary Class Will Elect Officers
Under Direction of Student
Council
Freshmen in the University will as-
semble at 4 o'clock this afternoon in
Hill auditorium for a combined mass
meeting which is being held under the
direction of the Student council and
which will mark the first meeting of'
the year in which all the yearlings
gather as a class. This is a meeting
for both men and women of the fresh-
man classes.
Gail E. Densmore, of the public
speaking department, will be the fac-
ulty speaker at this gathering. John
W. Kelly, '24L president of the Stu-
dent council, will also address the as-
sembly and Joseph A. Bursley, Dean
of students, will give a brief talk.
At the close of the combined mass
meeting all the classes will be dis--
missed except the freshman literary
class. This group will remain to
hold its election of officers under the
supervision of councilmen.
This is the second time that the
council has sponsored such a meet-
ing of all the freshman classes. The
first attempt was made last year with
the hope that it would unite the whole
freshman class in the University, and
encourage a spirit of co-operation
with the council as well as acquaint
the freshmen with each other.
It is felt by the council that the
new men should not only know their
classmates in their own immediate
colleges but should become acqaint-
ed with the freshmen in the other.
schools as well. As most of the year-
ling meetings held during the year
are limited to one class, this will be
one of the few chances that the new
men will have of gathering together
as the entire class of '27.
F OR 0 PROFIT-SHARING
PLAN PSSES COMMISSION
Washington, Oct. 10-A plan of pro-
fit-sharing, adopted by Henry Ford
for the benefit of employes of his rail-
road, the Detroit, Toledo, and Iron-
ton, was approved yesterday by the
Interstate Commerce Commission.
The corporation was authorized to
issue $1,000,000 in certificates of in-
debtedness, to be distributed among
employees, according to the terms of
the profit-sharing project, and to bear
a varying interest charge, depending
upon the profits of the railroad. The
plan is said to be similar to others
now in operation in the Ford enter-
prise.
ARMY ANTICIPATES
AID OF CONGRESS
Washington, ,Oct 10. - Secretary
Weeks anticipates that Congress will
make no serious attempt at the com-
ing session to further reduce the au-
thorizement of the regular army on
the present figures of 125,000 enlisted
men.
Mr. Weeks who has completed a

study of the budget requirements of
the military establishment for the
next fiscal year says today that the
army figures were down to budget to-
tal.

j
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IIARVTEY READY TO D)EPART
FROM COURT OF ST. JAMES.
London, Oct. 10-American Am-
bassador George Harvey plans to
say farewell to the Royalty at the
Court of St. James in time to eat
Thanksgiving turkey and pumpkin
pie at Peacham, Vt., his home
town. This sailing date depends
upon the time of King James' re
turn to London, but otherwise the
retiring ambassador is lining up
his affairs preparatory to his home-
going.
Yesterday, in accordance with
custom, his portrait, painted by
hkward Chandler Christy, was
hung in a prominent place in the
embassy along with those of his

p redece,sors.
ture is unique
bassy's first
bassador lone
ist.

Mr., harvey's
in that it is the
canvass of an
by an American

pic-
em-
am-
art-

LOWDEN TO SPEAK TMRO IH

Former Illinois Governor
Oratorical Association
Course

Will Open[
Lecture

COURSE TICKETS ON SALE AT 1
HILL AUDITORIUM TODAY
Opening the Oratorical lecture
course program for the season 1923-,
24, former Covernor Frank 0. Low-
den of Illinois will speak at 8 o'clock I
tomorrow night in Hill auditorium on
the subject "Organization of Govern-
ment".
Mr. Lowden is well-known in this
country as a lecturer, a lawyer, a
professor, a soldier, and a congress-
man. At the last Republican nation-
al convention he was considered one
of the most likely candidates for the
Republican nomination for President
of the United States and on several
ballots came near securing the nom-
ination. At the present time he is a I
member of the Republican national
executive committee.
Tickets for the entire course, in-
cluding 10 numbers, will be on sale
from 1 to 5 o'clock this afternoon and
tomorrow in IHill auditorium. Single
admission to the Lowden lecture to-
morrow night will be $1.
SPEAKERS ANNOUNCED
FOR ALUMNI BANUETS
Announcement was made yesterdayj
by the Alumni association of theI
speakers who will address alumni
banquets and gatherings in connec-
tion with educational conferences
throughout the state. Principal
among these is the address of Prei-
dent Marion L. Burton in conjunction
with a ditrict meeting of the Michi-
gan State Teachers' association at
Traverse city on October 29.
An invitation was extended to Haw.
ley Tapping, field secretary of the
Alumni Association, '16L, to speak be-
fore the Teachers' association there.
He will not accept because of his tour
of Iowa alumni clubs before the Iowa-
Michigan game.
Another banquet is. scheduled at
Alpena for Oct. 25, and Prof. J. B. Ed-
monson, professor of secondary edu-
cation, will speak Oct. 12 at Menomin-
ee at a similar gathering.
Flood Itecedes from Moore Haven
Tampa, Fla., Oct. 10-the water
from Lake Okeechobee which inun-
dated Moore Haven and the surround-
ing districts had fallen rapidly today
according to a dispatch to The Times.
The water reached its highest point
about three o'clock this morning but
the wind is much quieter today. No
visible damage was done to any build-
ings and only slight damage to stocks.

WICKERSHAM DENIED
RIGHT TO SPEAK IN
CAMPUSBUILDINGS
ShIRLEY S)H' mn EXTENIS ACTION
j OF REGENTS INT BARRING
ORATOR
PARTISAN CHARACTER
OF SPEECH IS REASON
Former Attorney General Will Come
In Spite of Opposition of
Board
Action of the Regents in barring
George W. Wickersham, former at-
torney general of the United States,
from speaking November 2 in Hill
auditorium on the League of Nations
was extended yesterday when Shirley
W. Smith, secretary of the University,
ruled that Mr. Wickrsham would not
be allowed to speak in any niversity
bulidng, because his speech dealt
with an issue of partisan politics. Con
trary to press reports, it was stated
last night by Thomas J. Lynch, '25L,
president of the Union, that that or-
ganization has taken no steps to pre-
vent Mr. Wickersham from speaking
there.
The present situation arose when
the newly-organized local divi-
sion of the League of Nations Non-
Partisan association invited Mr. Wick-
ersham to speak in Hill audito'rum
November 2. Mr. Wickersham is now
president of the council of the League
of Nations Non-Partisan association
of which Justice John I. Clarke, form-
erly o' the United States Supreme
court, is the leader. When the matter
was brought before the Board of Re-
gents at their session September 28.
permission for Mr. Wickersham to
speak was denied on the grounds that
it would be unwise for University
buildings to become forums for the
dissemination of partisan political
opinions. It was further stated that
the will of Regent Hill, donor of the
auditorium, specifically requested that
political speeches be prohibited from
its platform.
Faculty Committee Protests
A faculty memorial committee is
now preparing to draw up a resolu-
tion to be signed by faculty members
Who believe that Mr. Wickersham
should be permitted to deliver his
speech. Dean Henry M. Bates of the
Law school. Prof. Louis A. Strauss
of the English department and Prof.
Brand Blanshard of the philosophy (e-
partment compose the committee
which will submit the protest to the
Regents.
Dean Bates, in a statement last
I night, regretted that any newspaper
discussion of the League of Nations
as a party issue or as a question of
"free speech" should have taken place
and declared that when Mr. Wicker-
sham was invited to speak here, the
League of Nations association had no
intention or desire to put forth "po-
litical propaganda."
Will Not Interrupt Program
"The purpose of the League of Na-
tions Non-Partisan association," said
Dean Bates, "is to stimulate intelli-
gent discussion of a vital issue among
University students and others. The
work is primarily educational and in
no sense partisan. Most of the mem-
bers have suspended judgment on the
League and are supporting the or-
ganization simply as the best means
of insuring enlightened discussion of
the whole question."
Despite the fact that his appearance
in Hll auditorium has been prohibit-
ed by University authorities, Mr.
Wickersham will speak here on the
date originally set, November 2. It is
not yet known what auditorium will
be available, but it is stated definitely
by members of the League association
that the Regents' action will in no
way interfere with their program.

COVRNMENT MONOPOLY
OF BANKING URGED
Washington, Oct. 10.-(By A.P.)-A
government monopoly in banking was
urged today by Western Starr, repre-
senting the national committee of the
farmer labor ,party, who testified be-
fore a joint congressional committee
investigating enlargement of the fed-
eral reserve system.
"No group of men" said Mr. Starr,
"should ever be permitted to exercise
the powers now vested in the federal
reserve board. The witness declared
he favored having the banking of the
nation entrusted with the postal sys-
tem, with the local postmasters act-
ing as the government agent in the re-
ceipt of deposits and the making of
loas.
Mr. Starr was one of several wit-
nesses who alternately defended and
criticized the methods of the reserve

CUNCIL VOTES TO
PETITION 8OA0D
FOR BANOSPPORT
$i,0(I0 FUND NISIIED '1rt0OSEN D )I-
SICANS TO BO1Th lWI
AND WISCONSIN GAMES
CAMPBELL MAKES PLEA
FOR A SSISTA NC E
Says Student Responsibility Not Fair;
Plan Calls for Collection at
01o State Game
Student council members unani-C
mouly passed a resolution at their
meeting last night to petition the
Board in Control of Athletics for aid
in raising money to send the band tc
outside football games this year and
to shift the responibility of this un-
dertaking from the student ,body of
the U~niversity. This action was ta:I-
en by the council following a talk giv-
en by Robert A. Campbell, trmasurer
of the University, and by Carlton B
Pierce, '24M, manager of the band,
To Do Away W ith Tag Sale
"All of the niembers of the bandl
greatly appreciate the support givenj
them in pervious years by the Student

I

l I, wriB. Clunnidns
ltil 1924 the country will be with-
out a vice-lresident. Senator Albert
. C'rmminl, !resident pro-tem of the
lsenmat, b emes the rinanent presid-
ing (offcer, succeeding to the legisla-
. ivo dutie.; of the vice-president. The

SENIORS ASREI) TO OBTAIN
'ENSIAN PHOTO RECEIPTS
All seniors who intend to have
their pictures in the senior sec-
tion of the Michiganensian and
have not obtained their photo-
grapher's receipt from the 'En-
office hould do so at once.j
Receipts may be obtained at
the Press building any after-
noon from 3 to 5 o'clock. The
'Ensian advises seniors who have
not yet made appointments to
do so as soon as possible be-
cause photographers are start-
ing on group pictures.
CHINA HAS NEED
OF INDIIflUALism
BU'RTON

Pro-Tene Senate
Leader Become s
Permanent Head

"COTTON STOCKINGS5" TITLE*OF
1024 UNIO0N OPERA; PRODUCTION
TO HAiVE CAST OF SEVENTY-FIVE

: , . . .

council anti all of the students on 1rej
the campus through tag day donations premier of th
ynat they feel that it is not fair to Stat a'trlet-s

ucce ssion passes to the
e cabinet, Secretary of
Evans Iughes.

the students to contiui this policy o
semi-compulsory taxation. By the use
of tags public opinion often forces-
some students to give who cannoti
really afford to do so, but who do not rH N "
want to appear to the rest of the f 13OCH GED
campus as slackers. The band this
year is the finest we have had for a
long time and it should go with the -
team and rooters to both the Wiscon- Atitude Towwards Berlin P o 1i cy
sin and Iowa games. However we do U lt4erul by Visit of
not' want the responsibility to rest ;Von Hoesch
upon the students."
Council Petitions Board I ON' I U1LlU
The council's pettition to the Board 01" (WRMAN INTENTIONS
in Control of Athletics asks for per-GE
mission to pass buckets between
halves in the stands at Ferry field at Paris, Oct. 1U.-By A.P.)-The re-
the Ohio State game. The donations parations problem a: a whole is still
given by the crowd at this time, it is where it was before the German gov-
felt, would be of a purely voluntary ernment announced cessation of the
nature without any feeling of com- .
pulsion entering into it. If this llan Iathe onlsion in the Ruhr. It is
:s not thought feasible, the board is 1 Iles after today's visit to the French
asked to take over the supervision o foreign office of the Herr Von Hoesch,
raising such a fund. It is estimated the German's charge de affairs.
that approximately $5,000 is necessary Herr Von Hoesch told Premierl
ro ,. ii-.-A le+b,, L,..,.8 ., t,U11, 4 - 11; rE. -

President

Addresses

Gathering

to

Commemorate 12th Anniversary
of Chinese Republic
YANG TALKS ON ORIENTAL
EDUCATIONAL SITUATION
Three requisites for national great-
ness were named by President Mar-
ion L. Burton in an address last night
before more than 200 Chinese stu-
dents and friends gathered in Lane
Hall to commemorate the 12th anni-
versary of the Chinese republic.
He gave complete utilization of a
nation's national, human, and spirit-,
ual resources as "Essentials for Na-
tional Greatness". He said, however.
that we should not put too much em-(
phasis on nationalism as the world is
now still suffering from the results
of that very thing.
Must Utilize Resources f

CHARLES IL SWORD, '23, IS AUTH-
OR OF WINN ING BOOK; KRATZ,
'23, COMPOSES MUSIC
PLAY WILL OPEN LOCAL
ENGAGEMENT D E C. 3
Road Trip of 2704) Miles Will Carry
Show to Eastern
Cities
"Cotton Stockings," with the sub-
title, "Never Made a Man Look Twice,"
is to be the name of the eighteenth an-
nual Union opera. Charles T. Sword,
'23, of Mansfield, O., is author of the
manuscript, and with William C.
Kratz, '23E, of Buffalo, N. Y., is com-
poser of the music and lyrics of the
Opera.
Two-Act Comedy
This year's Union production is to
be a two-act musical comedy, whose
plot is of a type somewhat similar
to that of the story of Cinderella. The
principal character is Susan about
whom the happenings of the comedy
will turn. "The Opera book this year
is one of the best I have ever had the
opportunity to work with," said E.
Mortimer Shuter, director, yesterday,
"and I feel sure that from it can be
worked out a production of the great-
est excellence."
Kratz, who composed the music and
lyrics of this year's Opera with the
help of Sword, is general chairman
of the Union committees engaged in
work on the Opera. The number of
men on these committees, including
their chairman, is more than 30.
Kratz, assisted with last year's Opera.
Chorus Large
The story for the Opera was chos-
en from many Opera books which
were entered in the contest last
spring. The production is 9ne whose
scenery will easily lend itself to the
finest electrical effects. The cast and
chorus of this year's production num-
bers 75 men.
The distance which the Opera will
travel from the time of leaving Ann
Arbor until the time it returns is
2700.miles, by far the longest trip the
Opera has ever undertaken, The com-
bined population of cities which it is
to touch is 15,000,000 people. In ad-
dition to visiting the customary cities
of the Middle West, the Union musi-
cal comedy will visit four of the larg-'
est eastern cities.
Before starting its regular itiner-
ary of 15 cities, the Opera will appear
the week.of Dec. 3 at the Whitney the-
ater.
CREWS RECRUITED TO
FIGHT FOREST FiE
SITUATION IN UPPER PENINSULA
HAS IMPROVED, LOCAL
WARDEN SAYS

to send thle band to both the Wiscon-
sin and Iowa games.
John W. Kelly, '24L, preidenit of the
Student council, Thomas J. Lynch:
25L, president of the Union, and ilow-
ard A. Donahue, '24, managing editor
of The Daily were appointed as a com-
mittee to complete the drawing up of
th~s petition.
Officers Nalied
Donald C, McCabe, '24, was named
vice-president of the council at the
election of officers which was held.
The other officers elected for this
year are Hugh K. Duffield, '24, 'trea4
urer, and Robert J. hummer, '25, seo
retary.
Appointment of the standing con-
mittees of the council by the pros i-
dent are as follows: Advisory com-
mittee, John W. Kelly, '24, Donald C.
McCabe, '24, Howard A. Donahue, '24,
Donald W. Steketee, '24, and Jamnes A.
Rice, '24. This committee is alWay
comnposed of the council prosident
with four councilmen. TNwo sub-.
committees of this body were appoint-
ed, the members of which will, along
with the president of the council, rep-
resent the student body on the Univer-
sity Discipline committee and the Sen-
ate Committee on Student Affairs.
Howard A. Donahue, '24, and Donald
W. Steketee, '24, were appointed a ;
representatives of the former com-
mittee and Donald C. Mc( 'abe, '24 an-Id
James A. Rice, '24, to the latter one.
The class conmitiec will conist
of Hugh K. Duffeld, '24, chairman,
Edward Fox, '25E and Howard Heff-
man, '24M; class games, Donald C.
McCabe, '24, chairman, and lames A.
l Rice, '24. constitution, Howard A.
Donahue, chairman, Donald W. Ste-
ketee, '24, and Alfred Connable, '25.
0. S. 1. Pep Meet on Oct. 11)
A motion was passed by the council
to hold the Ohio St ate : e np )p te1
ing at 5 o'clock Friday niight, Oct. i19
instead of at 6:15 o'clock as was pre -
vidusly announced. It is thought that
as a later hour for the moeting can-
not be arranged for in hill auditor-
ium, that 5 o'clock would be more covi f
venient for all students.
The date for Tradiiios Nght was
set by the council for Thursday night:
Oct. 25. Donald C. McCabe, '21, is
chairman of the committce in charge
of that affair.
Cathedral Damaged by Fire
Pola, Oct. 10---The Cathedral was
damaged by fire burning the organ
and spreading upward, ca uing th
collapse of the roof; valuable art ob
iects were damaged.

Poincaire he was instructed to open. The, president in pointing out that
direct negotiations between the B3cr- China must use her national resources
uin aid Paris governments and to of- to the utmost, gave the United States
fer Germnany's co-operation toward as an example of a country that had
the resumption of the normal econo- developed for that reason, and he be-
hic life of the Ruhr. . liev-es that England cannot solve her
The Gerans are credited in French problems until she does utilize her I
circles with being ready to negotiate st
! only in order to have a hand in the res es opletelyp
Ruhr~ region niow that tihe resistance In speaking of his second precept, I
hr en In as w Pr atetier P ciresitolde he gave the opinion that the English
hlue ernenys thmatrPinasmich asd caste system does not allow full util-
netiGation wein progressmetwen ization of her human resources. China
ne gotiations were in progress between hsa niie upy btms
the allies and the groups of Indus-m has an unlimited supply, but must
j trialists and labor leaders in the Ruhr promote individual initiative, coupled
he did not consider it advisable to un- with education to develop her peo-
oh rtake further consultation with pTe.
Berlin on the same subject. Wh'Mlen The program was presented by the
Germany was ready to make a propo- Chinese student club with the aid of
sitiori covering the entire reparations the Chinese University club of De-
(inestin le should be glad to consih- I troit, more than twenty of whose mem-
er it:. bers journey to Ann Arbor. A violin
Tho communication made in Brus- duet and flute solo were given by
sels on Monday and in Paris today on three of their number.
behalf of the Reichstag are regarded history Outlined
as making no progress toward a final A three act play, "The Eve of Oc-
solution of the problem. A real gain, tober Tenth" was presented by theI
however, it is helu has been made to- Chinese Student club. This play in
wards material results from the English was written by J. C. Li, a
Ruhr occupation in the agreement student in Purdue University especial-'
reached recently with the Ruhr in- ly for the occasion of the celebration
dustril leaders and the allies will of the anniversary of the republic. An-
center their attention on such agree- na Lan, grad, William Wang, '24E.
anent until they receive something Florence Chang, '26, and C. C. Tong,
more prosg from BerlinI- grad, played the leading parts.
- "The tendencies of the present day
j Chinese education" was the topic of
J. M. Yang, grad., the only other
Ospeaker on the program with the ex-}
ception of President Burton. He gave
EL ED OPTION a resume of the changes that have
taken place recently in the mannerj
of educating his countrymen.f
Washigton, Oct. 10.-Retirement of Miss Y. F. Wu, president of the
Ambassador Child at Roe will be club, opened the evening by explain-
effective "at his pleasure" it is said cing thenreasn fthe eigatyhengaind
vfncialiy at tie State Department. The ing the reason of the gathering, and
ambassador is enroute to the United E gave the history of the republic since
tates on leave. If it proves to be tie revolution, the first shot of which
his desire to return to Italy and sev- was fired October 10, 1911.
tr his connection with the diplomatic
service at a later date, he will do so.
It was emphasized, that Mr. Child's
retirenient was at his ownm request I ELBRT[
t 1m t anniunceenet here of his Tfwir s c
n pi no c mstaes PROTE
the construcdl as indicating any dis-I
t sat ..0acIion with his work in Rome.s
____h kGeneva, Oct. 10.-The International
Labor Bureau of the League of Na-
CRUIS ANKHEADS tions has received a protest from the
GOLF TOURNAMENT federated labor organizations of Ja-
pan against the choice made by the
s i Tokio government of the delegates to
Me-mphis, Tenn., Oct. 10--(By A.P.) represent Japanese labor at the corn-
e -"ob" Crukshank, Westfield, N. J.. I ng International Labor conference
professional, driving straight and which will discuss the world's sys-
long off the tee and approaching with tems of factory inspection.

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Lansing, Mich., Oct. 10.-(By A.P.)-
Crews of fire fighters have been re-
cruited to combat the forest fires re-
ported raging in the upper penisula,
John Baird, state conservation com-
inissioner stated Wednesday.
In reports received from district
wardens, he said, "we have sufficient
force to cope with the flames. Our
reports do not show the situation to
be as serious in Michigan at least as
newspaper dispatches indicate." Mr.
Baird said that lie would not ask the
governor to send national guardsmen
to fight the flames unless the.fire fight-
ers now on the scene are unable to
Ikeep them under control. The dis-
trict wardens he stated are empower-
ed to take the necessary steps to pro-
tect life and property.
Two reports were received today.
One from Houghton, declared that bad
leaf fires are burning at Aston and
Toivola in Houghton county and in
the Sturgeon river valley near Arn-
heim, in Baraga county. The fires are
not under control, the report said. A
hot southwest wind and a very dry
condition with no rain in sight makes
the situation very dangerous.
Another report from Ironwood
read, "flash fires in Ontonagon, Rock-
land, Ironwood and Greenland town-
ships. Everything is being done to
control the situation. It is very dry
and there is a strong south wind."

r

Revival Of Old Fair Plan
Favored By Union Officials
That a revival of the old Union fair large, to raise finances sufficient to
as the coming event in the Yost Field aid greatly in finishing the swimming
house for the purpose of raising funds pool.
t "Such an undertaking," said Lynch;
to complete the Union swimming pool"wu, fcrsdmnthbak
would not only be a feasible plan "would, of course, demand the back-
but that it would be an excellent'uing of the entire student body in that
method for raising money for the pool every campus organization would have
ts to do something to aid in the produc-s
3s the opinion of Thomas J. Lynch tion of the fair. It would without a
,25L, president of the Union, and Ho-;doubt be necessary that these organ-
mer Heath, general manager of the izations aid by furn'shing such things
Union. as different acts of vaudeville, acro-
According to Mr. Heath, several batic stunts and the like.'
years ago when the Union fair was As the exact method of arranging
being staged the enrollment in the such an exhibition and as to what

Tug Sinks Off Cape Flattery
Port Angeles, Wash., Oct. 10.-The
tug Equator, of Seattle, which went
ashore last night in a fog near the
mouth of the Quillaute river, 50 miles
south of Cape Flattery, sank today,
according to word received here. The
crew was saved.

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