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September 24, 1923 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L

Alv

ilk

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1924

COOLIDGE AND CABINET POSE FOR CAMERA

TLY'I

A9NONYMOUS GIFT
EXPEDITION TO
BOOTH FOUNE
$100,000 GIFT TO UNIVERSITY TO JN
CONTINUE RESEARCH IN
NEAR EAST
DONOR DESIRES TO Ur
REMAIN UNKNOWN

With 84.18
a Heads

rds indicate a
age for the Uni-
ast year, accord-
"thur G. Hall who
piling the frater-j
art. This decline
eable among* the
dron of a whole

Old World Researih by Prof. Kelsey
Furthered-University Joins
Others in Field
As a result of a gift of $100,000
made to the University during the
summer by a donor whose name has
been withheld at his own request fur-
therance of the University's archaeo-
logical research in the Near East has
been made possible. The gift has
been made payable in two equal in-
stallments to be given over a period

Mrs.

Thi
the U
Colle
to tl

$1(
pro

led all the
s on the
th an aver-
er the reg-
verage. It
enth place,
by raising
Phi Mu Al-
ace to the
nity chart,
e of 77.3
ip
st scholas-
the chart.
e % of 65.2.
o the last
st year, to
an average
de by this
kappa rose
ng the fra-

The president and cabinet photographed tn the White House lawn.
This photo ,of President Coolidgeand the cabinet is the first taken of thenew chief executive and his officialfamily. -The cabinet remains to date
as it was in the closing months of the Harding regime. The photo wastaken after a recent cabinet meeting,the members adjourning to the White
Hose lawn to let the photographers"shoot" them for the "official family"album.

POO WORK PLACES
214 ONHOME LISTl
291 Placed on Probation by Action
of Administrativej
Board
NUMBER OF DISMISSALS NOT
ALARMING SAYS REGISTRAR

ld

nd place Two hundred and fourteen students
by Alpha did not return to college this fall as
lta Delta a result of' poor work done during
h it held the past semester and 291 were
e among
Theta. placed on probation for the coming
ints, ad- term as the result of action taken
> eighth at the close of last year by the Ad-
s. ministrative board of the University.
e frater- In addition 193 were warned -that un-
perienced less their work showed a decided im-
is year's provement during the coming year
iich lead they would not be allowed to stay in
year, has school.
hile Zeta One hundred and sixty-nine stu-
ond last dents who have been on probation
th. were taken off and installed as reg-
ular students as, a result of action
ethe av- ( by the committee and 85 students who
oth inde- were on threwarning list were re-
thoseof moved The board held over deci-
dropped, sions on :nine, students until fall,
red their while five .more were asked to ap-
the drop pear before the dean and give rea-
en coun- sons why they should be allowed to
e for the sitay in college.
kept at The large number of students who
ar, 72.43. were released from the prqbation and
aintained ( warning lists is encouraging and'
this year ( makes possible a prophecy that the
to do so average of scholarship is increasing.
according to Registrar Arthur G.
a shake- Hall The number of students sent
e profes- home is not alarming, according to
lta Epsi- the Registrar. The enrollment in
ast year, the literary college is approximately
alpha Chi 5000 making a total home list. of
n second about 4 percent of the students.
gma Del- Fifteen students from the total
id among number in the Literary college had
igma Nu, their hours of credit reduced as a
place to result of excessive absence during
nong the the year. Three of these were de-
made by prived of two hours credit and twelve
rain of of one hour.

DIMMEDLIGHTS ATTUR
CAUSE STUDENIS DEATH
John M. Baker, '25, was killed on
Sept. 13 in an automobile accidenti
which occurred near Wyandotte. Bak-I
or, with a party of four, was driving
from Detroit to Toledo, when the car;
shot over the bank at a curve and
turned over. The lights on the car in
which Baker was riding had been
dimmed to pass another machine, and
the light was insufficient to show the
curve.
All of the occupants of the car,
were thrown as it tipped over. They
were rushed to a hospital in Wyan-
-dotta, .wiere Baker died early the next:
morning.' The others are all serious-1
ly injured, but are reported to be re-
covering.<
Baker was a member of the Phi,
Kappa Psi fraternity.
LEGONNARES EXTENDED
RILROADCONCESSIONSl
RJB13PRS TO R1EC1VE ONE FARE
'RATE TO CALIFORN IA
CONVENTICON
Indianapolis, Sept. 23-(Bv A.P.)-t
The one far rate for the round trip,!
authorized by all American railroadst
to veterans attending the national con-
vention, is an inducement which isl
expected to take thousands of Ameri-£
can' Legion members to San Francis-
co, national headquarters here has
been announced. The convention
opens October 15.
These rates, confined to members ofr
the Legion, widows -of deceased mem-,
bers and members of the American
Legioni Auxiliary, will go into effect
at various dates from October 3, ac-1
cording to the distance .of ,the states1
from San Francisco. Identification
certificates have been issued through,
11,000 Legion posts, which must be3
presented to the veterans' home sta-
tion agent to obtain advantage of the
fare.
"All.Legionnaires must leave San
l Francisco in time to reach the orig-
inal starting point by midnight of No-
vember 15," said the announcement.
"The extended return limit, however,I
is sufficient to enable them to stop-
over at various points of interest on
going and return trip, to make side-
trips, or to take short ocean voyages,,
including trips to Hawaii. Within the
territory west of and including Chi-
cago, St. Louis, Memphis and New Or-
leans, tickets may be obtained which
read in both directions via the same
route. East of these cities, the same;
route must be followed in both direc-
tions."
THREE STUDENTS
GET COMMISSIONS

Prominent Eastern College
Will Speak Here
Tomorrow

Workerl

THREE LECTURES IN SERIES
ARE SPONSORElD BY S. C. A.
Rev. Albert Parker Fitch, for sev-
eral years in charge of the religious
work in Amherst college and one of
the most prominent college preachers
in the east, will deliver a series .of
three lectures tomorrow, We Inesday
and Thursday under the auspices of
the Student Christian Association.
The lectures will be given at 7:30
o'clock each night in Hill Auditor-

FITCH TO TALK ON
MORAL OBLIGATION

Summer Events
In Brief

Summary Compiled from the Files of
the Summer Michigan Daily
June 13-Charles M. Seitz died of
injuries sustained when he dived in
shallow water at Whitmore Lake.
June 15-Laws opened the seventy-
ninth Commencement. Clements li-
brary dedicated., Illinois' protest of
Big Ten track meet failed. Senior
girls' play. Michigan baseball team
defeated University or, Washington,
8-7. Announcement of opening of
SSchool of Religion here in. September,
19~24.
IJune 16-Michigan won national
track title at Chicago from a field of
62 contestants with a total of 31
points. Leland Stanford was second
with 141 points. Baseball team lostj
final game of series to Washington

of two years.3
Although it has not been made pub-
lic in exactly what direction the re-
searches made possible by this gift
will be conducted, the continuation of
work begun by Prof. Francis Kelsey,
of the Latin department, in 1919' is
now made possible, and the money
was presented to the University with
that purpose specifically stated.
It was during this expedition to the
Near East that Professor Kelsey suc-
ceeded in gathering for the University
a collection of Greek and Coptic papy-
rus documents' that is said to rival in
interest any similar collection in the
country. Professor Kelsey's work was
stopped at that time, due to a lack of
funds.
Investigation in the field of archae-
ology is being carried on at the pres-
ent time by five American universities
other than the University of Michigan,
which has an expedition. in,'the Philip-
pines under the direction of Dr. Carl
Guthe. Several shipments of speci-
mens have already been rec'eived from
Doctor Guthe. Yale university is con-
ducting investigations in Mesopota-
mia, while Hiarvard has senit three
men to different locations in the East
and Near East. Princeton and Chi-
cago are also represented by groups
of archaeologists in the Near East.
TAX EXPERTS CONVENE.
TODAYIN ANNUAL - MEET

of d
of t
yet l

iu .10-2.
In the first of the series to be de
livered tomorrow night, Reverend June 18-University graduated 1,773
Fitch will lecture o 'The . ~ ra p 'g- seniors-.Tlargest class inhistory ofin-
ligtion to-.be Int.elliget, . dstitution.'Thirteen honorary degrees
nesday - ight leture will be .o; the (Continued on Page Fifteen)
Sub)Ik ct of " Ineitorl or "Aquired tt 1 -
ligion," and tie 'final ,topi' w..h1 1en
"z eading the Crowd~or' Following t"U H
n his work among ' tho:'TROTSge.bsu-
in the eastern'.uni.versliti *of BAND
the country, Rev. Fitch has established
a r-putation for himself as a match-
Ies' leader of t11. students. lls. pop-. DRUM MAJOR A\D ASSISTANT
ularity has macie him one of the most MANAGERS ALSO TO
prominent spseakers 'among the REPORT
schools, and hi: lectures and talks are
i". constant demand.
Among the enthusiasts wh have Tryouts for membership in the Uni-
heard him er(ak, Reverend Fitc' is versity Varsity band, for drum major
known as "an artist, a prophet, a of the band and for assistant man-
matchless stylist, a coiner of. memnor- agers of the band, will be held at 7
able phrases, and a profound student o'clock Tuesday 'and Wednesday in
;of human nature." While intensely 'auditorium of. University hall-.
modern snd liberal in his outlook, he Men interested in trying out for
1 oss- ,e%' a keen spiritual su11so that the band should report to Captain
gives l-is utterance aeceptai !ity to Wilson at this time. The Varsity band
liberal ri' d conservativ'e alike. is an organization composed entirely
Previous to his accession to the po- of sstudents of the University which
sition he'. now holds as 'a religious plays at football, basketball, and
worker among the eastern' colleges, baseball games as well as at track
Reverend Fitch was president of An- jmneets and at Commencement. Some,
dover Theological Seminary and. pas- time during' the year the band goes
tor of the Mt. Vernon Congregational 'on a concert. tour, usually giving
church in the Back 'Bay of Boston. Helabout 'six performances in the larger
was a graluate of Harvard university cities of the state.'
and the Union Theological Seminary. ,The band is limited in number to
Each summer .for several years he 75 pieces, due to the fact that a larger
has supplied the pulpit. of the Brick ba'nd would mean a smaller percent-
Presbyterian church in .New 'York age of first-class musicians, which
City, the pulpit made famous y the would, lower- the musical standard of
ministrations of Dr. Henry Van Dyke,'! the organization. Due to the gradua-
and if he had chosen, he alight have !tion of a number of bandsmen, there
accepted the pastorate of that church are several .positions open to new
some time ago. men.f
Reverend Fitch 'is the author of a Tryouts are requested to bring oneI
number of books dealing with relig- piece of their own music with them.
lion and its relation to the 'college Stu- All old bandsmen'will report "at this
dent, prominent. among which are: time -to fill out registration cards.
"The College Course and the Prepr,.. Tryouts, for drum major will also
atic Life," "Religion and the. Under- report to Captain Wilson at this time.
graduate," "Can. a Church Survive sin The drum major is the drill master
the Changing Order," "Preaching an dofthe band. 'It is his duty to lead the
Paganism," "Eyes that See Not',"and band on march as well as perform
"A Novel- of Undergraduate Life." clerical functions, connected with the
. ______________~ '-- attendance at formations and' is re-
Fightty Per Cent WVork ,Thrugh ~' Sponsible for the issuance of orders
Detroity Set. 2 r.-(rBy A. P.) to the bandsmen. A knowledge of
t Detroit, Sept. 23.-By A. P.)--~music.is not necessary, but a sense
Eighty per cent of the students .en of - rhythm 'is 'essential.
rolled in the college of engineering, 'Managerial staff tryouts will report
University of Detroit, are enabled to Carleton B. Peirce, '24M, manager
work their way through "school, ac- of th'e band; at the' same time. This
I cording to statistics recently com- ? Af 1 nf tha huinlri

STATE AND FED RAL]
TO COME UI FOR
CUSSION

White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., E
Sept. 23.-(By A. P.)-Both state and libi
federal tax problems will be under ad
discussion by experts when the six- ut
teenth annual conference on taxation Ar
is held here under the auspices of the en
cho
National Tax association, beginning of
tomorrow. Notices already received est
of the appointment of delegates indi- its
cate that virtually every state in the in
Union and the provinces of Canada
will have official representatives here in
for the five days' sessions. Like pre+ ta'
vious gatherings, the conference will gif
be open to all persons interested in
taxation problems.
A discussion by former Governor
Frank .0. Lowden of Illinois on the
control of expenditures and tax lim-
itation is announced by A. E. Hol-
comb, secretary of the association, as
one of the principal features of the
meeting, and it is expected that in thei1
discussion much will be brought in
,concerning the former governor's
work in connection with economies in
state administration.
The "tax free" amendment proposed
to the federal constitution will be one
of the subjects to come before thei
delegates for consideration. This dis-!h
cussion will be led by Representative o
Ogden L. Mills of New York.
at

ht its
n twol

RKNODES SCHOLR WINS
HOUO RT OXFOR

alpha Albert Jacobs, '22, who for the past
two year has been studying in Oriel col-
last lege in Oxford University, England,
ne's Rhodes scholar from Michigan, cm-
83.7. pleted his first year there with high
eagh honors, passing his examination for'
Betsy the first degree in law, and receiving
1 far a high first in his "schools". His'
'aged record is considered excellent as
three years are ordinarily required
pities for the first degree in law at Ox-
, Tri- ford. .
drop- Jacobs took his tests under a se-
vere handicap, for he has been suf-
Mor- fering for a month from a hemmor-
lead. hage of the eye and was able to study
ation only two hours a day. He plans to
B" or stay at Oxford another year during
was which time he hopes to wil a higher
Soci- degree in law. Jacobs has been for
83.2 ithe last few, weeks visiting his moth-
e who lives in this cittv. He nlans

STUDENTS DISCIPI
THEMSELVES I

IF

I

Three University students, who
have been studying in the department
of Military Science and Tactics, and
were members of the local R. 0. T. C.
unit have been notif1ied by the War
department that they successfully
passed examinations during the sum-
imr. andare nnw waiting for enm-

Eleven students, menibers of t
Summer Spotlight cast, which p
sented its program in Hill auditori
on July 25, confessed to charges
intoxication and other conduct "
becoming gentlemen," and admix
tered their own discipline in the v
of a public apology, which was
lcansed to the naes

d

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