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May 23, 1924 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-05-23

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THE' MICHIGAN DAILY

-4

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41

II IIIMMW MAy i l lil iiiii rwr 11 wY Yw ! a.. M YIYI1 i - 1 w

)MEN DISCUSS PEACE
N INTRAINLMEFI
hicago, May 22.-The first inter-
Tonal summer school held in the
ed States,~ the sixth of the Womn
International League for Peace
Freedom, was opened when Jane~
anms, interg~atI onal president, pre-
led women ~repreenting 20 foreigni
atries to a Chicago audience Mon-
"Peace Sunday." Each woman
fly brought to her Amnerica~n audi-
_ glimpse of her particular na-
's presenlt situation, its struggles
peace and its hopes for the fu-

Girl Represents"
CtrlSaeInOratorical Meet;

LAY ASOR ENTERS
WSLAOWI CAMPIGN

! _ w rthe bulletin board in University hall
No ic s by tonight.
" , Act 1 of the Senior Girls' play will
rehearse at 4 o'clock today, act 2 at
Old embrs f Mrtaboad ~ 7 o'clock tonight, and acts 1 and 2 at.
9 o'clock tomorrow morning, at Sarah
meet at 5 o'clock today; at Betsy Bar-' Caswell Angell hail.
bour house:
IAnyone wishing a position at one
The Athena picnic will be held at of the summer resorts for vacation
5 o'clock Monday at the fireplace.j is asked to see Mfrs. Long in the of-"
Those wishing to attend must sign on fice of the' dean of women. Requests,

i

are coining in rapidly now, for appli-
cants for such positions. It is ad-
visable to apply immediately.

I

Adilt Ioma-n to Bir
Mliss Eva Minor, of Kankakee, Ill~,
was recently admitted to the bar, the
only 'woman in a class of 185. Al-
though a number of men in the class

honors. She did not attend cc
but studied in lawyers, offices fo
years before being awarded hie
ploma. Since she completed
course it has bcen made comma
for all students of the law to
at least two years in college.
Minor expects to practice her pi

~12110. Lucie Dejardin, of Belgium,
:tured her busy, industrial national,
recovery since the wear and the
provement in the status of working
pie who now have the eight-hour
y. Inl concluding, she said:
We no longer ask your help inp
ns or in money, but we do ask your
p in establishing peace. You who
1 generously after the wear, Let
past be forgot,' help us now to
d a structure of peace for the fu-

Lady Astor aririvgd in GAsgow on
iMay. 20 on fond, of, thieadventures of
her ,political',career. 'She'has left her
Shome to help b.eir friendl, Capt. AV. E.
Elliot,. in an election in the' Kblvin
SGrove Division of Gla~sgow, and ex-
pects a close runi fight.
j.W.lHutchison, who is the late nmem-
ber, received only 1,004 votes more
tha. te.socialist "canididate, Aitken
t Fergu'son, --no is running again, and
the liberals have put up Sir J. W.
Pratt as -a thir(I candidate.' While it
is probable that his chances are neg-
ligible, he will inevitably split the
anti-socialist Vote.4
Nevertheless, Lady Astor will try7
her quick .wit and ready tongue on a
Scottish audience. It is a compar-
atively new experience for her, for she'
ha snever addressed quite the same
type of an audience, but she, under-
stands their feelings. She knows ha w
shameful the housing conditions are1
in many parts of the city and she'
realizes that they are deadly in earn-
est. But she is sure that her sincere
disbelief of socialism can be .a cure
for all evils.
' She is prepared to answer any,
argunments. of' the Glasgow extreme;'
ists in their own city as bravely as,
'she has 'done in the house. Tomor-I
row she begins her work, and is lookr- I
ing 'forward to the strenuous question-I
ing from the working class section oilfi
the electors.
kYO7R (GROCER HAS CRESCEN'P
11ATLEWE=HOXE SYRUP i MAK-

a

mwwmmm
MWOW60M

'te most
refreshing
nws on ithis

page

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In the hottest " dog-days,", when even the
diagonal has a crumpled look, it's not easy, to
appear fresh and cool. Sweaters won't do.
Blouses are hot, too. Tub-'silk's the thing!
Three A orabl Tub'-SIk Frocks

I A-13,

7J3ra~u Lida Heymann, of Germany,
turning away from her nation's pres-
enit problems, spoke with optimism 'of
the future.
"In Germany, too, there is a~ new
force. Women have representation
and power In the government and
th~ey are trying to bring their demands
to all political parties. We women
muist give something; that was cleax
after the World War. ; We Germuan
women must show German men that
the most important' thing is to work;
for peace. They must understand that
more courage is needed for non-viol-
en~ce than for violence."
~Miss Dorothy ;vans, of England
spoke of her country's grave unem-
ployment problem as the outcome of
intternational hostility.
Mine. Duclien Says,
French Women Are
'1rrench women would be able to cto
ii thing politically to stop a future
w r," says Mine. Gabrielle Duchene,
noted French feminine leader, now in
tik United States. Mine. Duchene,
with Andre Jouve, started the move-
rnt of the "Calliers :~de la ~Paix,"
sdpewhat -m ar.toth okr lpe
plan. She is 'nw 'accmpaniying the
group of women on the "Pax Special"
th ough the United, States.
WOhave not the vote" she 'explains.
'Our women do not apparently care
fo it. They are' so strong through
th indirect power they have awy
weded that they have' not fought like
'tmen of other nations for s'uffrage.
Always they have had such influencel
with men that they do not apparently
'want political freedom.
"'We realize that our greatest force
lies in educational work, in the di-
rection of thought from war to peace.
"There has been a reciprocal effort
between the French and German units
to bring about a rapproachm ent of the
two peoples. The Germans are
bu~ilding a community house in the
City of Laon, we on our part liave
adopted 100 children from the Rlhur
divtrict and. are sending funds t;- hlp
the families who have suffered dis-
comifort owing to our occupation ofel
their territory.
"'The French section of the Women's
International League for Peace and
Freedom disapproves the occupation'
of' the Rhur."
Soph~omores Attend Teat '[ance
A sophomore tea dance 'was given1
yesterday afternoon at Helen Newber-
ry eiec.Kthy lre 2,ws 'in charge of the affair, and Ann!
G 1e, '26, entertained with a novelty!
dance. Bridge tables were supplied
for those who did not care to dance,
and refreshments were served in the
parlor~.

i,
"
Y
t,
r
Mr'

MIIss Eleanor JHuber
Young men and women represent-
ing seven zones in the United States'
will compete in a contest in Washing-
ton to' be presided~ over by President
Coolidlge which will be the culmina-
tinof a national oratorical contest.1
Miss Eleanor Huber, of Louisville,
'Ky., won the central zone eliminatinf
contest, held in Chicago, will repres- ,
ent that section of the country in the
final.'

--a rich .ripened blend of
real Jamaica Ginger and
pure fruit juices -- is a
beverage that mixes well
under all conditions.
" When good fellows 'et
to ethers enjoy one,' f
these delightful conbi-
nations --

/ I

.
.
:
i
i
i
1

Will Devote Paper to Women
University of Oregon, May 22.-Ore-
gon women will come into their own
as journalists, when the last issue
of the Oregon Daily Emerald is pub-'
lished this term. A four, page section
to be devoted -to women's activities,
written by women and containing pic-
tures .of Oregon's most prominent wo-
men will be a feature. of the final ed-
ition. Marian Lowry, who' has been
a. ,news editor 'on the paper for, 'the!
~last year wi~l be the editor.'for the
special section. .
35Wloine'iiAro (1n*0Jltnlon Delegates
It is estimated that between 350 andI'
400 women 'will be delegates and alI-'
'ternates to the Republican national.
convention in Cleveland in June. Wo-
men will be included in the list of as--
sistant sergean~ts at arms, uishers and
at the convention. The assistant ser-
geants at rams will be. from the states
and the ushers from'Cleveland.
.I
Guests
Eat at W~illits
The exclusive transient /housej
just one blockc from Hill Audi-
torium.
'I. IH
is Special $teak or Chaick= n 1)inner j l
$1.00
Sho1rt Orders .1I
1 Smart Service

Ginger Tea
109 sea exrc[ A-B
Gin er Ale, khedf
Emlb $ alf.

Shandy Gaff
B'ua weiser andl
QGnmer Ale, half
arxc half.

WANTED-AT "O. CtLE
MEN AND WOMEN
AGENTS
PARtT TImE or FULL TIMWE
Porei 1044 For Appointment
E~ther Before p A. X1.
or After 8 P'. x.

Horse's Neck
issace by actdang
lemon rind ftnc
-ry j c aclltecd ice to
&-B Gingar Ala,
ST LOUIS

G-203 t II

$25.00
First," candy-striped
frock with white
tucked bosom front. Center, all-white tub
Slim and straight. silk. Monogram and
$2,4iO tie add color-black,
copen, orange, maize.
$25.00

$29.50
Third, candy-striped
tub silk finished with
fine tucks and white
binding.

I+imelhoch's

p

no

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Across From $ tatler
, ERI

If

I3i t'ri1 utalra .

v-1 7lS BEVJSJAN~E COM"PA'NY

. :7

An~ a I i. .._~g~

..
" , . ,_

I ~' '

oodyear's

M ay Sales

h_

TODAY

ANDSTUIA

OFFICIAL WAR DEPARTMENT

ak HgePic Ct
124' SOUTH MAIN4-TELEPHONE'1, 00

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WORLDI) AI?

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Absolutely }irst Sho'wing
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AND THlE MOST 'TALKED OF I3AR-,
FARE IN ".THE HISTORY OF ILAN

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IN ACTION llDUN TIIE1.
IJNRESTRICCTIED WWAA iR E

camel's Hair
Coats, $39.5O

Smart Spring
Frocks, X29.75

-STAITINO GSUNDAY-

VU.

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Stunning sports coats that envelop one
in 'comfort arnd style. Rich plaids; stripes
and plain colors. Almond green, brick-
dust and tan are some of the cQli0s. Sizes
are 16 to 18. Other sports coats are.
special in May. Sales at $25 to $49.0.
SECOND FLOOR

Values to $55. For street, afternoon, -
dinner and evening wear. Of canton,
flat crepe, satin-faced crepe,. roshanara,
georgette and lace. Black, brown, titian,
navy, tan and red. Sizes 14 to 44. And
at $39.75 are dresses regularly to $65.'
SECOND FLOOR

Francis Hodgson Burnett's
N61vel.

"THE DAWN OF.

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a w, c,

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A., TOMORROW"

Sweaters are
X2.49 63.75

Eiffel Silk
Hose, 89c

WITH,

Featuring

JACQUELINE, LOGAN

CorneGift

Smart sleeveless styles of silk and wool
in rarcricallU eer clo arl cnmin

SjIecial for today only! Made of pure

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