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May 20, 1924 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Task

. ... un... . u.. ....
DATE SET BY HA1L
weial Matriculation Day Expected
To Relieve Office Strain of
Treasurer
FEJUD ONLY TO STUDENTS
NOW A T ITEND ING UNIVERSITY
1n order to accommodate students
io wish to register at the first op-'
rtunity next fall so that they may
t their athletic coupon books and
nd in applications for games as soon
possible, Registrar Arthur G. Hall,
sterday announced Monday, Sept
next fall as a special pre-registra-
n day for that purpose.
This offer is opeuronly to students
o are now attending the Univer-
y, and does not apply to any new
adents who will matriculate for the
st time in September. There will be
Sclassification committees in ses-
)fl during the special registration
y, and payments of fees is all that
I1 be permitted.
New students will register, and all
11 classify at the regular time, Sept.
to 20, inclusive. The University will
open on Monday, Sept. 15, at the
gular hours, from 9 until 12 o'-
ck and from 2 until 4 o'clock.
The reason for this action, as point-
out by Registrar Hall is that the
st day of each regular registration
Hod has for the past two years been
oe than double that of any other'
the remaining four days.
In view of the fact that many of1
e students return to Ann Arbor sev-.
al days before the date set for en-
1 ment, the Registrar thinks that he
11 be able to accommodate both the
adents themselves and at the same.
ne relieve the strain upon the Treas-
er's office on the first day.I
Arrangements have been completed
th the office of the Treasurer andI
is also expected that this step will.
followed by the Secretaries of the
er colleges on the campus. Regist-(
Hall stressed particularly that the
w offer was in no way open to new
idents, but only to those now here
the University.I
Nir. D. R. Gorham representing theI
L. Poates Co. of New York city of-
s occupation for college men inter-
ed in learning to sell, and who
e anxious to earn the means for
thering thjeir education this sum-
r. Men interested may see Mr.1
rham at the Union between the
urs of 10 to 12 A. M. and 2. to 8 P.

'

'r

OPTIMISTIC REPORt
Money is Easy With Rates in Favor!
of Borrowers, Says Weekly
Statement
COAL SITUATION DEPLORE 1)
25,000 UNION iNERS FDLE
New York, May 19.-Rather less pes-
simism in regard to the state of trade
is apparent now than a few weeks
ago, according to the weekly trade re-
port of Bradstreet's. There seems to
have been a growth of the idea that
the short swings noted in the sto(,k
market for some months past may
have their counteipart in trade and
industry, with the result that con-
sumption, plus restricted output, will
act to prevent excesses in either u
or down directions.
The coal situation is the most de-
moralized in years. More than 25,000
union miners in Illinois are idle, while
non-union mines working are turning
out more coal. Although consumption
of oil has increased, that marked is1
weak. Special sales at reduced prices
are being put on to increase buying
by retailers. Money is easy, accord-
ing to Bradstreet, with rates in favor
of borrowers.
Bank clearings at Detroit show e
loss of 4.1 percent. The total of clear-
ings at leading cities of the United
States for the week ending May 15,1
aggregated $7,898,906,000, a loss of 6.5
percent from last week.
Textiles in primary textile mark-1
ets' continues slow. Many cotton
cloths and finished goods are offered
at prices far below parity with the
present cost of the staple, and pro-
duction is being extensively curtail-
ed by northern and southern mills.
The sale of 85,000 bales of rugs at
auction this week by one of the largest
manufacturers shows that buyers will
operate when prices are satisfactory
to them, according to the belief of
Bradstreet's.
Railway clerks ask for an advance
in wages equal to the basis of 1920,
which will cost an addition in the
wage bill of $55,000,000. Legislation
in favor of the farmers is set for a
hearing this week and next, with a
strong feeling in its favor, regardless
of cost. In the building industry the.
big drop from March, was due to the
passing of the exemption tax legisla-
tion for another year, which cut down
the totals at New York from the in-
iated aggregate reached in March.

Ambassador Quits
Berlin As Rebuke

'LEADERS
CAMPUS

USS
ILEMS

I

Hold Conference at Fresh Air Camp
On Patterson Lake Under \
S. C. A. Auspices
NUMEROUS TALKS GIVEN
BY UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

9 o

I

I--

European Travel

Teheran, Persia, May 19.--T
ish neighborhood of Teheran
tacked Friday by a Mohamme(
with the intention of massacrei
plundering the population.
intervention of the police, six
were wounded seriously.

Campus problems, and all of the
various phases of the campus troubles
which are continually confronting the
students leading in activities at the
University, formed the subject for the
discussion at the annual Capipus
Leaders' conference, held last Sunday
on the site of the University of Mich-
igan Fresh Air camp, at Patterson!I
Lake, under the au pces of the Stu-
dent Christian association.
Those attending the conference were
taken out to the camp in motor cars
provided for the purpose, leaving Lane
hall at 2:30 in the afternoon. The
program was p~resided over by h-arry
C. Clark, '26L, retiring president of the
Student Christian association, whilej
short talks were given by the different
leaders in campus affairs. Milo O-
phant, '24E, chairman in charge of the
Fresh Air camp, spoke of the need fort
students to act as camp leaders at
one or more of the various sessions of
the institution. Students who will be
in Ann Arbor for the summer months
and who would be willing to act as
tent leaders at the camp for one of the
ten day periods are asked to leave'
their nan es at Lane hall as soon as
possible.
Harry D. Hoey, '24, retiring manag-
ing editor of The Daily, acted as dis-
cussion leader.

1924

TOurs for Selected
and Limited Number
of Young Women

TOUR "A"-June 26-Sept. 13..".". ... .. ....$1,030
TOUR B"--June 26--Aug. 21 ....... . ......$700
MISS ELIZABETH PERSONS, A. B. Wells College,
M. A. The johns Hopkins University.

11

; ano
spite Or1
rsons 707 NorhtI

MISS A. HOBBS
For informatron

E itmiett Branch
The tisk of repairing the damage
to party fortunes caused by the con-
viction of Warren T. McCray, gover-I
nor, on the charge of using the niails
to defraud, is faced by Emmett
Branch.

Nikolai krestinski
A serious strain exists in the diplo-
matic relations of Germany and Russ-
ia because the soviet embassy in Ber
lin was raided by Prussian police
searching for an escaped communist
prisoner. Nikolai Krestinski, Russian
ambassador, departed Berlin for home
after the incident , as a rebuke.

ANN ARBOR
,816 Tappan
Phone 2798

DErRorT
2989 W. Grand Blvd.
Phone 3774

L=

rsirrww

FLOWERS

For Flowers for your
porch box
Call
115
Cousins &H all

drraoetlarl,
17 leads-aildealers
Damon-
"What was the name of that pencil
Professor Williams was recom-
mending this morning?"
Pythias-
"Eldorado-my boy, Eldorado?
Just think of a fabled land of
ease and happiness-where no one
flunks-where pencils are the magic
sticks of achievement. Then you
can never forget it."

.' r p
i
a p ,
y -. j ir _ ._
- a , 3
<<;
, I '
; ,
. ,.
I --
,
t t U
: :
I _ ;
i a , -
, , , 16'!
at ,~ I
_ ..
+ i=ce

611 E. University

Call

115

, ~.... ~-

"a 5'/ °'.air a/ i ,A .t ° + « .wE'°°, °". ".~' /" ° + " « wC! .e "" / "'" "~,I!11.i0°° I °

Showinc at
Campus Bootery
May21 and 22
CLOTHES FOR THE COLLEGE MAN

l

te Up---

Onze. dime taktes Ohl
111 ~ lIHenryl--and yoOU
say that was some
Read the Want Ads r
-

BETWEEN THE ACTS

at POPULAR PLACES

Before your vacation your liqui-
dation of liabilities comes about.
Why not do it the easiest way thru
a checking account with the

XI!

I

Nettleton Shoes

EASING melodies tinged with
laughter-music and merri-
ment fill the air-follows .... a
lull, as you seel your table-My,
but it's hot-want some real
refreshment? Order Budweiser
-Sold Everywhere.
ANHEUSER-BUSCH
ST. LOUIS

I

Farmers and Mechanics Bank

I

1-105 S ,Main St.

330 South State

%"./

Samoa

'4

II

_I

De
-lust
patter
a deb
toma
centei
toned
signe
Yo

- -s
,,,coray Shirting'
COMMENDED for decorations:
heenspun stripes of artificial silk
rous silvery stripes that "set up" a
rni and set it off like diamonds on
utante -made up in a way cus-
ry only with custom makers--
r-plaited to the bottom- six-but-
. T he *vatterns are exclusively de-
d and woven for Eagle. Shirts.
u'll like them. Excellent value.
3. F. Wuerth Co.
Fashion Park Clothiers
t to Wuerth Theatre Downtown

The DINNER SUIT
'DEBONAIR, comfortable,
tailored with the care that in-
sures both smartness and wear,
from materials approved by ex-
clusive use. Thecomnfortexteuis
to the price.
DINNER SUIT
(Shawl collar or notcb)
$39.50
Manufactured and sold exlusively by
NATLUXENBERG&BRos.
New address
641 Broadway N.W. Cor. 13th St,
Stuyvesant 9898 New York City
ranclres

i
j
40
j . 0 OJ
' - :'o
. .iP:a ! 0
.' '
:y ,
'' + .'.r

calfskin.
calf.

edrr rrpssrel r+m

Also in vikiig

mmm

KLEIS BEVERAGE CO.-Distributors
ANN ARBOR

H-204

}+S - - - I'11 IIII IIF - 1

$12.50

..-w.

Wah r's Shoe Store

231 WaterSt.
Exeter, N. H.

$63 Broad St.
Newark. N. J.

The Complete Project
for the Sland rd
Oil Building
New York City
CARR2 RE
and
HASTINGS
Archirects

Our style-meio book will be
snt free. on request

DOWNTOWN

108 S. MAIN

W hatever your 'Choice of a Career," college training has increased
your economic evalue, and "whatever business or profession you enter,
adequate life insurance is a proper self-appraisal of your powers in that
direction.
The traditions,practices, and financial strength of theJOHN HANCOCK
Mutual Life Insurance Company are such that a college man can take
especial pride in having a John Hancock policy on his life. It is also
a distinct asset from the start. It will pay you to buy it; and later on,
should you think of joining the field corps of this company, it will also
pay you to sell John Hancock policies. Our representatives will tell you
just how, and assist you in selecting both your career and your insurance.
e4ddress cAgency'Department
Six tyon Yeas in Business

In black and tan smooth

Q.E. CO.V.Bc A-
"The New Architecture"

k

A DISTINCTLY new tendency is apparent in architectural
thought and design today. Architects are designing in
masses -the great silhouette, the profile of the building has
become of far greater importance than its detail.
Thrs a new vignr and rugednes even in building swhich ,-re nven.

Nex

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