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May 18, 1924 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Platform

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Big Factor In
Next Election
By Z. S. Bailey
e broadcasting station, as well as;
stump or platform, will be a big
ical factor in the presidential
ion in November. In fact, in one'
at least it will be a greater factor
either. That is in point of audi-
What vast coliseum could hold
thousands who will hear such
ons as WEAF, New York, or
J, Chicago?
ere will be two kinds of political
aigning "on the air" in the next
months, according to indications.
first is the paid advertising type.
rts some weeks ago stated that

What The WildWaves Are Saying
The English have a new designation The University of California and
for amateurs, that is to say, "Ham." other western educational institutions
It is understood that this is an ab- are cooperating with station KGO to
breviation of the Cockney word, hama- bring to the radioists the best teach-
teur. You know 'ow it is! ing ability there is to be secured.
* * * . Every Monday night at 8 o'clock (Pa-
Another notable feature of the big cific time), the Oakland radiophone
program a week ago yesterday sent goes on the air. Among the speakers
out by The Daily from station WCBC will be, Prof. F. L. Griffin, head of the
was the fact that Lewis N. Holland, department of agriculture at Cali-
'23E, handled the entire mechanical ?fornia university, Alice Bumbaugh of
operation of the plant himself the music department of Mills college'
throughout the afternoon, and did a Oakland, Joseph H. Jackson, literary
little announcing as well. i editor of the Sunset magazine, and
* * * Frederick O'Brien, author of South
Did you know: That all large broad- Sea tales.
casting stations are required during
their period on the air to have an
operator in another room, with' a re-4
ceiving set tuned for 600 meters. This
is in order that the station may hear H eadliners
any SOS calls on the air and imme-.
diately cease broadcasting, or if pos-
sible be of any assistance to the ship Programs
in distress by notifying authorities or, , TODAY
rebroadcasting the SOS.
* * * 111:00 a. in.--KYW Chicago, 536 me-
Ann Arbor fans daily have the op- ters: Church services.
portunity to listen to one of the best 5:00 p. m.-I lVJ Detroit, 517 me-
stations in this section of the country ters: Orchestra.
and the first station, to be erected by 5:00 p. m.-WIAIP Chicago, 360 me-
a newspaper in America, it is claimed. ters: Organ recital.
We refer to station WWJ, the Detroit 7:00 p. m.-WGN Chicago, 370 me--;
News. ' ters: Musical program.-

WEDNESDAY
7:30 p. m.-KYW Chicago, 536: Din-
ner concert.
7:30 p. m.-WMA Q Chicago, 447.5:
Musical.
8:00 p. m.-WGN Chicago, 370: Mu-1
sical.
1:00 a. m.-WGN Chicago, 370:
North pole concert and features.
THURSDAY
2:35 p. m.-KYW Chicago, 536: Stu-,
dio program.
4:15 p. in.--WCX Detroit, 517: Musi-
cal and early baseball scores. r
7:00 p. m.-WVX Detroit, 517: Musi-
cal.
8:00 p. m.--WGN Chicago, 370: Mu-
sical, popular and classical.
10:00 p. m.-WLW Cincinnati, 309:
Popular music.
FRIDAY
2:35 p. m.-WMA Q Chicago, 447.5:
Concert.
7:00 p. m.-KIDKA Pittsburgh, 326:
Features.
8:00 p. m.-WN Chicago, 370: Mu-
sic, popular and classical.
10:00 p. m.-KYW Chicago, 536: Mid-
night revue.
SATURDAY
5:00 p. ni.-WBZ Springfield, 337:
Concert.
7:00 p. m.-WCX Detroit, 517: Mu-
sical.
8:00 p. m.-KYW Chicago, 536: Mu-
sical.

their efforts 'have shown remarkable i
results.q
The set operates on the principle I
of amplification of the output fromt
a master ascillator tube, known ast
Holland, grad., and Lewis 11. Dorf,;
'24E. The work has been carried on
since the Christmas holidays, and,
the Heising system. The voice cur-
rents from the microphone are ampli-1
fled and thereafter impressed upon
the modulator tube which varies the
amplitude of the ascillations of the
master ascillator. The modulator,
which uses three tubes of five watts:
each, is in itself a complete . radio
sending set. This power is stepped
up by means of four 50 watt amplify-
ing tubes, making the total capacity
of station WCBC 200 watts. The high
plate potential is obtained from a
General Electric synchronous motor-
driven generator set. Each of the!
five-watt tubes requires a plate po-
tential of 500 volts; each 50 watt
tube requires 1,000 volts.
The antenna used in the experi-
mental programs has been of an un-
Susual type, and it has been used in a
manner not intended when erected. k
The antenna output is 1.5 amperes.

tenna and the lead-in. An antenna the prongs of the vacuum tu'
should be as taut as the wire will loften collects on the contact
stand and the masts should be guyed This should be cleaned off at
to prevent swaying in a heavy wind.
Good insulators should also be used; tervals. It is a good practice
a poor insulator is often the cause of up the springs with a file
loss in power. in order that any corrosion I
have collected will be reme
The socket is another place where is also necessary to bend the
trouble frequently develops. There upward once in a while to
are few good sockets on the market good contact.
at the present time, most of them fail
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to make a satisfactory contact wih

i)aizy ciassinea fr rea

Th
camp
few
The
Repo

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WEAF had already'received and con-
templated accepting offers for such
pay-by-the-in i n u t e advertisements.I
Several political leaders have an-
nounced that they will bring the quali-
ties of their candidates as well as
their political platforms before the
country by means of the radio. Such
campaigning will be plainly labeledl
as advertising matter and undoubted-
ly treated by the listeners as such.
The other type of campaigning
might better be called propaganda. It
has already manifested itself. Under
the guise of education or public-inter-
est speeches, smooth-tongued candi-
dates will ease their way into the
good graces of the great band of ra-
dioists.
From the two or three examples of
this kind of campaigning which the
writer has already heard, the method
not only promises to be popular but
to have a really powerful effect on the
public mind. That.such a system can.
hardly be anything but an evil goes
without saying.
One big move to harness radio for
the benefit of politics, many believe,
is the construction of a municipal
broadcasting station for the city of
New York. The significance of th-is
seems to me to be great, especially as
it will certainly serve as a precedent
to other large cities. What does it
mean?
Supposing the City Hall owned a
newspaper which had a circulation
equalled probably by no other news-
paper in the city. In the hands of
a group of clever politicians this paper
woul.d so influence public opinion and
consequently votes, that the job of
dislodging that particular administra-
tion would be tremendous.
A powerful radio station will serve
this particular purpose just as well
as the newspaper used in the example
above. With such a means of reach-
ing the public, the men in office will
always have an immeasureable ad-
vantage over the new aspirants..

Every Home Needs an Elec
Heater; $795 and $10-5o

I
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Radio Points

There is one disadvantage in the
monopoly of broadcasting stations by
the newspapers. The latter, with not-
able exceptions, are showing them-
selves unwilling, or afraid, to give
fair publicity to the doings of stations.
owned or connected with other news-
papers.
* * * ~ --
Paris now has five broadcasting sta-
tions. More than a dozen American
cities can boast of that number and
several can nearly double it. Chicago
and New York lpad.
The past week has been necessarily
one of silence for station WCBC in-
asmuch as the set had to be practical-
ly dismantled for the Cap Night exer-
cises yesterday.
* * * r
WGN, the Chicago Tribune-Zenith
station, is on the war path. Not con-:
tent with holding the world's distance
broadcasting record, they now con-
template an attempt to better the
mark. They made the present records
their first night on the air under the
direction of the Tribune and after sev-
eral months practice they may im-
prove on their first try.
America's first "radio college" has
been started by station KGO, General
Electric company, at Oakland, Cali-
fornia. Languages, music, agricul-
ture, economics and literature are a
few of the subjects scheduled.

7:30 p. i.-1'WJ Detroit, 517
ters: Church services.
10:00 p. m.-WEAF New York,
metrs: Music and features.
MONDAY
4:15 p. m.-WCX Detroit, 517:
sical.

me-
492
Mu-

6:00 p. m.-WMAQ Chicago, 447.5:
Chicago theater organ recital.
8:00 p. .-WOC Davenport, 484:
Music.
8:00 p. m.-W(N Chicago, 370: Mu-
sical.
TUESDAY
4:30 p. m.-WMAQ Chicago, 447.5:
Musical.
2:35 p. m.-KYW Chicago, 536: Mu-
sical.
4:00 p. m.-WDAF Kansas, 411: Mu-
sical matinee.
5:00 p. m.-WWJ Detroit, 517: Early
baseball scores.

8:00 p. m.-WAQ Chicago, 447.5: -
Orchestra.
9:00 p.rm.-WMAQ Chicago, 447.5:
Chicago Theater revue. Wi advent of hot weather, the
sWitlheavnofhtwth
10:15 p. m.-KYW Chicago, 536: Late usual amount of static common to the
show. I summer temperatures and atmospher-
All times shown here are Eastern' ic conditions is also due for radio re-
Sstandard time, and the same as Cen- ceivers. It is, therefore, not inoppor-
tral daylight saving time. tune to review in short some of the
major causes of disturbance in the
receiving set, in order that the inter-
VVUDIJ DRI bL bV IIDIVBfltV I nal defects may be distinguished from
the external causes.
S ON ON M LPWE An irregular crackling, still almost
always present and especially when
The remarkable results secured by the wind is blowing, accompanied by
station WCBC under comparatively momentary decrease in signal
small power have brought many in-! strength, can frequently be traced to
terested in studying the hook-up used the antenna. It may be too slack,
by the University station. and in such cases it will sway with
The apparatus used was designed the wind and make contacts with non-
and built by E. E. Dreese, instructor insulating objects. There may be a
in electrical engineering, Lewis H. faulty connection between the an-

Now, when furnace fires are apt to
be out, is the time when you'll appre-
ciate the warmth an electric heater af-
fords. In the bedroom or bathroom,
at breakfast, late in the evening-when-
ever and wherever it's cold, just touch
the button and enjoy complete com-
fort.
Tmw'h eDetroit Edi son

COmpaly

Mtain at IWillian

Telephone 2300

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UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister

I CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
I ICHURCH

TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH

ZION LUTHERAN
CIURCI
Washington St. and Fifth A
E. C. STELLHORN, Pastor

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May 18, 1924
10:30 A. M.
Morning Service

All Services Held in Lane Hall
Corner State and Washington Sts.
SERVICES
Sunday:
Bible School, 9:30 A.. M.
Christian' Men's Service Club,
9:30 A. M.
Preaching Service, 10:30 A. M.
Rev. J. A. Canby will conduct
the service. Subject: "The
Teachng of the Sermon on
the 1wount;1",
Students' Bible Class, 12 noon.
Young People's Service, 6:00 P
M. Social with light refresh-
ments.
The midweek prayer service is
held at 7:30 on each Wednesday
night. Topic: "The Coming of Cor-
Rebus:"

(Missouri Synod)
Corner Third and West Huron Sts.
CARL A BRAUER, Pastor
"The Relation Between Christ's
Work and The Work of the Holy
Spirit."

REV. L. F. GUNDERMAN, Pastor,

A CHURCH

Fifth Ave. and William St.

WITH THE
BIBLE

-0-

5:30 Student's Supper.
6:30 Discussion: "Lutheran Con-

. I1 9:30 A. M.-Sunday School

My Lady's Beauty Needs
A Choice Assortment of Perfumes
--Perfumes of Fragrance most appeal-
ing to any woman, the highest quality
brands of Toilet Soaps, Talcum Pow-
ders, ;nd other Toblet necessities can
be found at any of our three stores.

'The Formality of Prayer"
4:30 P. M.
OUTDO7ORSMEETING WITH
SUIPPER
Leave the church at this hour
All students welcome

seiousness." Henry Donner, lead-
er.
No evening service.

10:30 A. M.-Sermon. "The Cloud
-Is It Darkness or Lightl"

9:00 A. M.-Bible study hour
10:30 A. M.-Service with .sera
Subject: "hiTe Perplexing Li
While." John 16, 16-23.
5:30 P. M.-Supper for studer
6:30 P. M.-Student forum dis
pion hour. Topic, "The StWi
1,0e of Some Great Luthera
Miss Dorothy R. Kiefer, lea

5:30 P. M.-Student Forum at
Parish Hall.

Zion

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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

I

REV. MERLE H. ANDERSON, D. D., Minister
LEWIS C. REIMANN, '10, Sec'y Men Students
MRS. NELLIE CADWELL, Sec'y Women Students

HOUBIGANT-

BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
4th Ave., near Packard
G. A. NEUMANN, Pastor
Sunday School at 9:00 a. m.
9:00-Sunday School and Bib
Classes.
10:00-English Services.
11:00-German Services.
FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
R. EDWARD SAYLES, Ministe
HOWARD R t CHAPMAN
Mi1nister of University Students

10:30 Morning Worship. Sermon Subject:

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1

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
REV. ARTHUR W. STALKER, D.D., Minister
le REV. W. SCOTT WESTERMAN, Ass'ociate Minister
MISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship. Pastor's Subject:
"THE LONG MOTIVE"
12:00 M.-Bible Classes meet in Wesley Hall.
-- 5:30-6:30 P. M.-Open House at Wesley Hall.
6:30 P. M.--Wesleyan Guild Devotional Meeting at the church.
Howard Haag, just returned from Harbin, Manchuria, will sp
on his work among the Russian Refugees.
7:30 P. M.-Evening Worship. Rev. Mr. Westerman, Associate Minis
speaker. Subject:
r "THE BURDEN BEARER"

Extracts

Powders

"DREAMING, DARING, ENDURING"

,

Bath Salts
COTY-

5

12:00 Student Class. Dr. Anderson will speak on "The Theory of Evo-
liution and the Fact of Faith."
5:30 Social Hour.
:30 Christian Endeavor. Beryl C. Schafer, '25, will lead on the topic:
"What Is the Greatest Force in The World."

Face Powders

(New Metal Compact)
HUDNUT-
Face Creams and Powders
GOLDEN PEACOCK
BLEACH CREAM
-(Ask About This)
Toilet Water and Perfumes

I

Ot. Anbrrwg- E 01=4lMIurl
COR. CATHERINE AND DIVISION STREETS
HENRY LEWIS, RECTOR
RACHEL HAVILAND, Secretary for Student Work

SUNDAY, MAY 18TH

10:30-Worhsip and Sermon, "Sham
and Rdeallty.'I Mr. Sayles.
Music
Anthem: "He Shall Come Down
Like Rain".............Allen
Quartette
Baritone Solo: "Q Dry Those
Tears".............Del Riego
Mr. Gerald Barnes
12:00-Church Bible School.
12:00-Students Class at Guild
House. Mr. Chapman.
6:00-B. Y. P. U. in Church Par-
lors.
5:30-6:30-Friendship Hour at.
Guild House.
6:30-Students Devotional Meet-'
ing. Topic: "Things We Do and]
Why We Do Them." Leader, La=,
verne Whitney.

THE FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER EASTER

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
HERBERT A. JUMP, Minister E. KNOX MITCHELL, University Pasi
LUCY HUBER, Secretary for Women Students
"THE STONE CHURCH WITH THE WARM WELCOME"
What is the suff of which glory is made? What are the factors of hap
ness? Who is the human success? These questions are to be, a
wered by Mr. Jump in his sermon at 10:45 a. m. on
"WINGS AND MUD"
The Student Fellowship, if the weather is inviting, will meet at 4:
p. m. for a hike of a mile to F. E. Royce's farm, a campfire,
camp supper and then discuss
"HOW DOES SOCIETY LOOK AFTER ITS CIIILDREN?'
George Ariss appears n a remarkable film at 7:30 o'clock, followi
a -brief sermon by Mr. Jump. Its title is
"THE RULING PASSION"
It contains much humor and fine delineation of character. The chur
was crowded at the Mother's Day Film last Sunday.

Lotion and Soap

8:00 A. M.--Holy Communion.
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer and Sermon by the Reverend Charles D.
Erdman, D.D., of Princeton, N. J.
12:15 P. M.-Bible Class for Young Women.

I

Calk ins-Fletcher Drug bCo

4:00 P. M.-Students will gather in Harris Hall to go on a hike and
have a picnic supper.

$3

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