100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 16, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

A1IN
I

00ee,

Sr

:43
Ci

11

WESTERN tCl
IA)1'(iMOIAL A

No. 167

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1924

EIGHT PAGES

i . .:. t

-----------

Ii

.
11

LLINI 1
FORCED
OP.



FRESHMEN ASKED TO GIVE
TOQUES FOR STUDENT AID:
In accordance with, an agree-
ment between the Student coun-
cil and the European Student Re-
lief committee, Freshmen attend-
ing Cap Night' ceremonies are
asked to burn their pots, arid do-
nate their toques to the old
clothes drive at that time. The
toques will be very useful to the'
foreign students, particularly
in the Kiev district, where Michi-
gan contriubtions are being sent
in.
The sending of the Michigan
freshman insignia to foreign stu-
dents is not only a help to them,
-but puts Michigan on the map In
Russia.

.1

ZRG
ILE

f
C

and McEllven
'ooker in

members of Michigan's
'ack team left at 9 o'clock
for Urbana, where they will
arry Gill's Illinois squad in
et this afternoon. The team
npanied by Coach Steve
anager Art Graves, andI
>c Staads.
a will be forced to the lim-
r to win from this year's
ack,team, a victor in every
h it has entered this.season.
;e and Black squad has to
the winning of the indoor
e meet together with over-!
victories against California
Dame in the outdoor season.
Superior Indoors
door season it showed itsqlf
superior to the Wolverines
re it doubled in the indoor
comparative records made
teams in the outdoor sea-
the Illini still to be in the
s squad was strengthened'
inning of the outdoor sea-
Steve Farrell has been un-
ate any remarkable perfor-
ig those who have reported1

Notre

In

BILL EXCLUDING
!P 1
JPs JULY FIRST,
DISREGARD PRESIDENT'S WISH
OF ADJUSTING MATTER
BY DIPLOMACY
BOTH HOUSES GET OVERI
T W O-THIRDS MAJORITY
Lower Body Votes 308 To S8 On Meas-
ure Senate Approves By Count
Of 69 To 9
Washington, May 15.-Congress,
disregarding the desire of President
Coolidge that the Japanese immigra-
tion problem be adjusted through dip-
lomatic channels adopted today by
overwhelming vote in each house the
conferees report on' the immigration
restriction bill which provides for
kAsiatic exclusion after next July 1.
On the basis of the balloting today
in both the house and senate there
were votes 'to spare to repass the billj
over a presidential veto. The vote!
in the house was 308 to 58, or 64 in
excess of the required two thirds maj-,,
ority to, override a veto, and in the
house it was 69 to 9, or 17 more than
two thirds.
SMITH CHOSEN MANAGE
Of. BAND FOR NEXT YEAR
'Arthur T. Smith, '26L, was elected
manager of the. University of Michi-
gan band at a business meeting held
recently in Morris Chapel. This is
the first playing manager that the
club has had for some years.
Other officers. of the year, which'
were announced at the annual ban-:
quet Tuesday night at the Union, are:
Q. McKay Klein, '26L, president; J. K.
Altland, '24, vice-president; Benjamin
Boyce, '26, librarian, and Edward D.
Holdmaker, '26, assistant librarian.

Painted Demons
Seize Captives
By Migh ty Oak
lsten to this tale of romance,
1Tale of Indian warriors hold-
In early moon of Green Leaves
Caine they forth, the stoics valiant;
Forth they romped to paleface wig-
' wam,
Wigwam once of friendly Great Chief,
Paleface mighty 'mong his kind;
Came he forth to take their token
Of the war path, they would tread.
Then to the mighty oak of Tappan
Dashed the screaming, yelling red
men;
To the three of Indian legend
Where the white men pale and tremb-
ling
I Stood around the mighty oak;
Warriors choice of paleface nation,
{ Choice of Tribe to run the gauntlet.
Downthe warriors, painted demons,
Swooped and caught their prey like
eagles.,
Loud the war-cry stirred the stillness
As they seized their hapless captives,
Forth they bore them to their wigwam
There to torture at their pleasure.
Tlvere they ate round glowing camp-
fires
Heard the words of mighty wisdom
Smoked the pipe of peace and friend-
ship.
Thus there came to Michgamua
James K. Brooker, A. B. Connable, Hal-
sey Davidson, Irwin F. Deister,
George C. Dillman, Eugene L. Dunne,
William Etheridge, John Garlinghouse,
George Haggerty, Perry M. Hayden,
Harry McCobb, Charles Merriam, I
James K. Miller, Jr., George 'Pattee,
Frederi.ck Pinney. Charles Reinke,
William D. Roesser, John A. Sabo,
Herbert Steger, Philip M. Wagner,
Lester W ittman.
'COTINE COTHES
COLLECTION DRIVE~
Oarments Wanted For Needy European
Students; Boxes To Remain,
On Campus
DONATIONS WILL BE SOUGHT
AGAIN TODAY AND TOMORROW
Collection of old clothes for, needy
European students will be continued
today and tomorrowmnornhig, it was'
announced yesterday by' Tyler "R.
stevens; '24E; chairhan of the drive
committee. bonations have been re-
ceived to a considerable extent, but
the diffleulty. of collection makes it
necessary to continue "the drive over
through tomorrow mori'ng.
Students :re urged to give all old*
clothing in their possession as the
conditions abroad are deplorable. Stu-
dents are clubbing together so that I
each member of the group may attend
classes one or two days a week, it is
reported. Any discarded clothing
which has any wear at all left would
be of use.{
To Keep BoxesI
Three boxes will be kept on the
campus today and tomorrow, one in
the Engineering arch, one in frontI
of the Library, and one in the Law {
building. Donations from residents in
Ann Arbor not connected with the
University will be taken at Lane all
or may be deposited in a box in Mack's
denartment store

380 FATHERS WILL SCENES FROM OLD
JOIN IN TWO DAY PARIS WILL MARK":
jCELEBRATION HERE AYFETE TONIGHTj

Leads March

PROGRAM WILL OFFICIALLY OPEN
WITH BANQUET AT UNION
TONIGHT
DAY, SMITH, STANLEY
TO ADDRESS GATHERING
Tickets For Dinner Will Be On Sale
Until 10 O'clock This
Morning Only
Fathers' Day will be ofilcially open-
ed today with a banquet for the more
than 300 fathers that are expected
and their sons at 6 o'clock tonight in
the Union assembly hall. William L.
Day, OOL, formerly judge of the 'Ohio
Federal court will deliver the prin-
c ipal address. H. H. Smith, '95L, of
Detroit, now a candidate for the re-
publican senatorial nomination will
act as toastmaster at the affair.
George Stanley, '76, will also be one
of the speakers at thxe banquet.
Franklin Dickman, '25E, chairman
of the committee in charge of the
Father's Day program will provide
guides for the fathers. They will be
Stationed about the library.
In carrying- out the program for
tomorrow, special space has been
roped off for the fathers at Sleepy
Hollow where the Cap Night cere-
monies will take place at 7:30 o'clock.
Dean Kalaw Gives Illustrated Talk
On History and Conditions'
Of Islatnds
STRING BAND OF DETROIT
OPENS EVENING PROGRAM
Playing Filipino tunes ' which
brought back inviting memories of
their homeland, thle Filipino String
band of Detroit,, o ?ened the evenin- !
program of "PhiIppine Night," which
was held last night in Lane hall au-I
ditorium for the purpose' of bringiig1
together Filipino students of the Uni-
versity to enjoy an entertaining pro-
gram of Philippine character.
Dean 1. JM. Kalaw, of the political
'science department, exchange pro-
fessor from the University of Philip-
pines, delivering the principal address
of the program, 'outlined the early
history of the- Philippines and spoke
upon the existing conditions in that'
°nuntry. -His talk was illustrated with
slides.
. "Every member elected to the pre-
sent legislature by the Filipinos," he
said, "has been chosen on a plank'
which favors both immediate Inde-
pendence and asking the United States
that she redeem her pledge to the
Philippines."
SENIORS TO ISTRIBUTE
724 BALLPPLICATIONS

COLLY
FINAL R5

t that Michigan
al events it will
team than that
ndoor meet.
i Quarter
in will be 'much
rnish Midhigan i
lini than before
sfer of Charlie
user to that di-

ACHITECTS DRAW ON FAMOUS
LATIN QUARTER FOR
SETTING
PRIZES WILL BE GIVEN
FOR 2 BEST COSTUMES
Grand March To Start At 11 O'cloi;
Dancing From 9 to 2 By Rhodes
Orchestra'
Vivid streaks of color, quaint old
French cafes, the old and equally
famous Boulangerie, the Tabac, the
Hotel de Printemps, and many other
interesting and unusual attributes of
the Latin Quarter of old Paris form
the setting of, the sixth annual archi-
tect's May party, to be held tonight
in Barbour gymnasium by the stu-
dents of the architectural college.
The committee in charge of build-
ing the setting has been at work for
the past three days in the gymnasium
putting in place the painted panels
depicting bits of Latin Quarter at-
nosphere and character, the work of
Albert Peck, '25, and Walker Everett,
'25, as well as arranging for the light-
ing effects which, according to J. A.
Fronczak, '24A, chairman of tyhe gen-
eral committee, are to form an im-
portant part of the effect. There is
to be an immense central chandelier,
from which will stream the light blue
crepe. This will be given added ef-
fect with the installation of the col-
ored lights, as well as with the varied
colors of the costumes of those pre-
Isent.
Setting In Paris'
The entire setting is designed to
give 'the atmosphere of the Latin
Quarter which is generally inhabited
by students, of the lights in the cafe
windows,aof the gay throngs in the
streets,' and3 of the deep purple of
a Parisian night overhead.
Special favors for both men and
women have been procured, and
beaded handbags in keeping with the
scene, will be given to' the women.
There will also be other .smaller
favors.
The grand 'march is to be held
promptly at 11 o'cloc, and is'to be
formal in character. This is not only
to form a definte eyent iin the party
1flt will afford the" costume 'uges"
an opportunity to make a close in-
spection of all pre ent efore award-
ing the prizes tol the best men and
womenthere. This committee to have
charge qf the judging, Is headed 'byl
Prof. Emile Iorch, of the architectur-
,al college. A pair of bronze candle-
sticks are to b given for the best
girl's costume, and the man will be
given a cigarette case..
Dancing s To Play
Dancing will be from 9 to 2 o'clock,1
and refreshments will be served some
time in the course of the evening.
The largest Rhodes orchestra avail-
able will furnish the music for the
} party, and it isturged that all attend-
Iing arrive on time.
All tickets for the affair .hav been
sold, although according to Fronczak
higher costs than .estimated will make
It' im possibie that any fnancial gainI
be mae. t was hoped that they!
might be able to leave a small fund
with which to carry on the May'
party next year.
PLAYMAKERS , WILL SItE
CGAAY MOUSE", TOIGH

Maryette Ryan
Miss Maryette Ryan, '23Ed, of Mt
Pleasant, will lead the grand march
at the Architects' May party tonight
with Joseph . Fronczak, '24A, gen-
eral chairman of the ball.'
COOLIGE VTOS
. i
Says Bill Economically Unsound And
Morally Unjust; Thinks It
Undesired
HOUSE STARTS ATTEMPT
TO OVERRIDE PRESIDENT
'Washington, May 15.-(By AP)-
The soldiers bonus bill was vetoed
by President Coolidge today on the
grounds that it was economically un-
sound and morally unjist.

1 1

tVCEPTS N031INATIO
BY DEMOCRATIC
CONVENTIO
FITTING CLIMAX
CAREER SAYS
Nonilnee Relieves That
lems Facing Nation Ne
to Aid Soluti
By John IV. Co
Dean Mortimer E. Cool
gineering college will b
for the United State se
Democratic ticket this fi
nouncement was made la
in an exclusive intervie
Daily and is the first
Cooley has given out anyt
lication regarding the :
ments being made to ent
senatorial race which
Wednesday when the
I state convention' named
candidate. President Ma
ton acquiesced in the ma
ingto Dean Cooley.
In discussing the reast
fluenced his decision to
date, Dean Cooley pointed
greatest problems coni
nation today are chiefly
to engineering, such as tr
reforestation, developm
Great Lakes and St. La
and the conservation of
sources. There are now
in congress and he belie
experience along this Ii
in the solution of many o
leins.
Dean Cooley feels tha
better able, if elected to
interests of the enghieeri
and help to raise it to a
towards which he has b
through the many natk
with which he has bee
(luring the past 43 years

other events Michigan
stronger than it was
he 11 ini .were met'be-
improved condition of
o had just started train-'
ae. Ray Smith will' be
r competitorin the high1
was before, while Cal-
roved in the two mile,
iffen in the: one rile,
low 'hurdles, Doyle in?
id Higins in the dash-

Returned unsigned to the -house, I to see a greater
where the legislation originated, the engineers and
measures 4nyne taken up hat the forme
~ ediatflysc ,Lle advanta;
its frinds in an effort to override$ the mdxpertence
fex' cute action a noly h eoufi 1,te
of leaders of bdth 'yarties obtined' la;Iast, fall Re
postponement of a vote until Saturday. to become ac
The president in his veto message,& because of gill
document of more than 2,000 words, bther duties:cor
declared he could 'see no justification's.now just je'urn
for enactment. of the. bill into law vacatin fproi:
and added: "Our country cannot af in the. best of:
ford it. The veterans 'as a 'hole do I service with th
not want it. All our. American prin- Iwith which he
ciples are opposed to it. There is no ipires within the
moral justification for it." he reaches the

e .engin
is till
e next y
retiring

Iulse Out of Condition I
Michigan's entries should have' lit-!
le trouble in making things interest-
ig for the Illini in most events. Hig-
ins, Wittman, and Hubbard will run
he dashes against Evans, Ayres,
[ughes, and Shock and although Ev-
ns is expected to win the 220, all oth-,
r places will be a toss-up. Loomis
end Hulse will be prepared to keep
)ace with Kinsey, Johnson, and Plato'l
f the Illini, and Loomis may be able
o flnish ahead of Kinsey.' Hulse. isf
till in poor condition.
Reinke and Roesser are both fast
uarter milers and it will be all that
larter, Koonz and'Fessenden can do
o beat them out. In the half mile
aptain Hattendorf and FreybergI
hould both finish ahead of Ponzer,
Ilinois' best bet in the event. The
aile should go to Hall and MacKeever l
f Illinois, unless Griffen and Hicks
if Michigan come through. Callahan
,nd Mason may both place in the two-'
nile against Mieher and Marzulo of
llinois.j
Predict First for Brooker
Jim Brooker should have little trouble!
n taking a first in the pole vault and
tay Smith and MacEllven are better
han any Illinois high jumper. De-i
Iart Hubbard is not expected to have
nuch competition from Sweeney in the
>road jump. Brooker and Doyle of
dichigan, are expected to place n the}

ACTIVITIESCONFERENCE
WILL BE. HELD SUNAY1

SMEATON AICCEPTS OFFER
OF ALBIONPRESIDENCY1
Albion, May 15,-Announcement was
made here today that Dr. John 'L"!
Smeaton of New York city, assistant
secretary of the board of education
in the Methodist Episcopal church
and in charge of all Methodist col-
lege work of the last five years, har
accepted the position of President of
Albion college, which was recently '
tendered him.
Dr. Smeaton is expected to report
for work about July 1.
Tegucigalpa, Honduras, May 15.-
This city is peaceful and order has
been restored as a result of the re-
cent peace agreement. Damage caus-
ed by the fighting here is estimated at
$20,000.
Tokio, May 15.-The war office an-
nounced that 4,000 workmen employ-
ed in the arsenals and clothing fac-
tories will be discharged May 31 as
part of the program of army reduct-
ion inaugurated in 1922.
Senior and graduate students in
the school of Education were given a
reception by the faculty of the
school yesterday at the home of Pro-
fessor and Mrs. C. O. Davis.

,
r
;
I
I

r Applications for tickets for the Sen-
Drivers for the Wh'ite swan and oBa hchwlbehdJue1,
Varsity laundries. and Goldman's ior' Ball. which will be held June 12,1
rsy adrsan ldas may be, secured by men at the booth j
cleaners will take all old. clothing ay e Ured by men a to o
turned over to them and deliver it to at the Union today from 3 to 5:30 o'-
the committee at Lane hall. jclock, and. tomorrow .morning from
Will "tCollet Donations 10 to 12 o'clock. William Clore will
Shoes, overcoats and suits with a be in charge of the distribution.
little wear remaining will be welcom- Senior women may secure their ap-'
ed.- It is probable 'that contributions plications from either Dorothy Rock-E
from the University will be sent to the well or Margaret Demmon, who will
Kiev district where the Michigan kit- be at Barbour gymnasium from 3 to
chen is now located. 5 o'clock this afternoon.
Groups or individuals who have not All seniors are urged to place their.
been in touch' with the committee, and applications as early as possible, so
who wish to contribute to the cam- l that the committee will be able to
paign can arrange to have their do- f locate a place where the ball may be
nations collected by calling Lane hall held. If there are less than 250;
or Stevens at 396. couples the affair will be held in the

C
7
,l ;
,
;
.
.
a
-.
i
''
i.

More than 60 invitations have been
sent to leaders in campus activities to
meet in conference at Patterson lake
next Sunday afternoon. For the first
of these-conferences, which was held
last fall, more than 40 men gathered
at Lane hall, and wvere motored to Sil-1
ver lake, where a discussion of univer-
sity social problems ensued. At that
time President Marion L. Burton ex-
pressed a desire that such meetings
might occur often, indicating that the'
effects of such assemblies might be
felt in the social atmosphere of the
Michigan campus.
The mailing of invitations has been
delayed until after the campus elect-
ion, in order that the newly': elected
officers of the many activities might
be included. John Garlinghouse, '25,
acted as chairman of the personnel,
committee; Thomas Fiske, '25, is in
charge of refreshments, and Carl'
Ohlmacher, .'25, is arranging for auto-
mobile transportation. Harry Hoey,
'24, will preside over the meeting.

[lhe Regents and his
tUniversity would be co
time.
President Eurton w
give his views on thi
last night said, "I
Cooley's nomination f
States senatorship av
max to his career, a
glad that he has acce
PAN CHA E L
OF SELECTINS

ALPHA OMEGA ALPH
iINITIATES FIV E

Union ballroom, but if more tha'n
that number intend to attend' the
dance it will be necessary to secure{
Waterman gymnasium for the ball.
AINNAROR STA HATS

will enter Wittman, Big-
ubbard in the dashes, Au-
high hurdles, Hulse and
the lows, Roesser and
the quarter mile, Captain
and Freyberg in the half
and Oriffen in the mile,
id Mason in the two mile,
the pole vault and discus,.
he shot put and discus
KeEllven in the high jump,
he javelin throw, and Ald-
immer throw.

Reports are favorable concerning
"The Gray Mouse," Prof. John L.
Brumm's play to be produced tonight!
at the Whitney theater by the Ann 1
Arbor Playmakers. This is the initi-
al attempt of the Play-makers to stage
anything more pretentious than a one-I
act drama. They have not swerved,
however from their policy of present-
ing only those plays written by mem-
bers of the organization.'
John Hassburger, '25M, of Comedy'
club fame has been secured to play'
one of the leading roles. Vera Katz,
'24, Velma Leigh Carter, '24, and Mar
garet Geddes', '26, a-re other well-
known members.
The play deals with a crisis in the
life of 'an American family which
threatens to destroy it. The daugh-!
ter of the. house is. the first to see
the danger and averts it through a
plan which is carried out by her
mother.
Prof. R. W.. Cowden of the rhetoric
department has directed the-product-
ion with the assistance of Professor1
I Brumm.
The proceeds will be directed to-
ward the remodeling of the present-
playshop which is inadequate for the
needs of the enlarged association.

'f

ANNOUNCEMENT!

J

No doubt our beloved patrons and
friends have noticed that their'
sincere servant has received ad-.
vancement in this world. We will
continue to serve you in another
capacity and will see to it that the

Five men, members of the junior
medical class were intiated into Al- OPEN
pha Omnega Alpha honorary medical COI~ U ESN
fraternity at the annual intiation ban- --
ruet Wednesday e ning at the Michi- Columbus, May 15.-Five Ohio StateJ
gan Union. These men are, Daniel D. I track men have just proudly opened'
Arnold, Karl E. Beierlein, David H. the straw hat season- here with hats'
Conditi Jaments F. Johnantgen; and ! offered by -Ann Arbor haberdashers
Charles L. Pannabecker. to all men winning firsts in the Michi-
_ _ _gan-Ohio State track meet last Sat-
Stockholm, May 15.-The standing urday. Just another proof that merit
extraordinary r'evenue committee of I is its own reward.
the Swedish Riksdag has refused to
recommend the government bill pro- Rome, May 15.-King Victor Em-

Woman Professor
Will Teach Here
Michigan's new School of Business
Administration will be unique in one
feature-it will have a woman pro-
fessor, Miss Margaret Elliot, recently
appointed assistant-professor of per.
sonnel managenent. Professor El-
liott will not take up her new duties
until the second semester of next year.
The new faculty member took the
degree of bachelor of arts from Wel-
besley. Following this, Miss . Elliott
acted as an instructor in mnathenmatics
at Abbot academy, Andover, Mass.,
for a year.
In 1918 while connected with the
United States Ordinance department,
she was stationed at the Watertown

Selection of' both men
debaters for the Varsity
year will be made upon
plan than that formerly
cording to the recent an
of Prof. Thomas C. True
public speaking departme
ing class composed of 12
| women is to be formed I
speaking department, an
class the teams will b
take part in the Central
bate and the Michigan--O
debate.
Membership in this cl
obtained only by trying
outs will be held somi
month and will consist
minute speech concerni
party in this country si
in England.
Three hours of Univerel
be, given for the course.
I who are interested shoul
names at the officeof
speaking department, roo
hall, as soon aS possible
PTE ISSUES. I
FOR ENSIAN

Nu To Hold
. .T

. Second se

mester

FVO wlA A .AI1 ..

11

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan