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May 02, 1924 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-05-02

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GA

A

VI.t L

I OF THE

ed every morning except Monday
e University year by the Board in
)f Student Publications.
rs of Western Conference Editorial
on.
Lssociated Press istexclusively en-
the use for republication of all news
s creditedrto it or not otherwise
n this paper and the local news hub-
erein.
i at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
as second class matter. Special rate
e granted by Third Assistant Post-
eneral.
.ption by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
eet.
ig:.Editorial, 2414 anQ 76-M; Busi-
communications, not exceeding 300
vial be published in The Daily at
etion of the Editor. Upon request,
tity of communicant will be re-
is confidential.
EDITORIAL STAFF
lephones, 2414 and 176-31
MANAGING EDITOR
HARRY D. HGEY
itor................... Rcbt B. Tarr
Board Chairman.... R. C. Morarit-
tor ................J. C. Garliaghouse
Night Editors
iles A. B. Connable, Jr.
Clark T. E. Fiske
'. IM. Wagner
ditor ..............Ralph N. Byers
Eitor...........Vinona Hibbard
ditor............... Ruth A. Rowellt
('ity Editor. Kenneth C. Kellar
Michigan News Bureau.R. G. Ramsay
- Editor...Robert BI. Henderson
Assistants
3arley Elizabeth Liebermann
erkman R. S. Mansfield
EUcknell E. C. 111ack
Boxer Verena Moran
rown Harold Moore
Conrad Carl Ohln-,acher
te Cote Hyde Perce
>avis Andrew Propper
Ehrlich Al arie Reed
'ernamberg Regina Reichmanr .
artner Edm.arie Schraud~~
hheath C. A. Stevens
enry W. H. Stonemanl
Houseworth Marjorie Sweet
ine Frederic C. Telmos
Kamin N. R. Thal
t Keil V T Wdthour
enanl Ilerman Wise
. ri"U4Zr
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER,
LAURENCE H. FAVRO'I
ng....................E L. Diinn-
ing ................Perry M. .1layden
ing ................:.....W. Roesse:-
ng....................I. E. Rose
:........................ll. L. lla r
ion............... .....C. Purd>
ion ................Lawrence Pierce
Assistants
Campbell N. I. Holland
Caplan M. L. Ireland
hampion Harold A. Marks
'olin Byron Parker
T. Dexter A. J. Seidman
J. Finn Geo. A. Stracke
k. Fox R. C. Winter
Haight
FRIDAY, MAY 2,1924
Editor-PHILIP M. WAGNER
I MOSCOW ART THEATER
PLAYERS
rtwo weeks remain of the

A subtle feeling of en
this time of year in th
many who aspire to th
of a sheepskin, a feeling
those who will complet
legiate caieer at the
ceremonies a few weeks
first of the traditional c
ing up to this culmin
college year has passed.
all colleges and schools
versity are swinging can
venerable fashion.
Next week another ma
ity will be assumed by t

PROSPECT i-1 ill 11111111111111111111[[[ 1111111111111111[ [(111111[1111111111111111411111110 11 1fitil2
vy arises at AfAuf1 s oC N iOI
I'MtD LL CAMPUS OPINION
he minds of - asIn
e ownership iOLF dE SUPPLIES
of envy for TO THE BOYS USELES tORiANiZED CHEERING L
e their col To the E ter: -
I was fascinated by a communica-
graduation1 FROM THE TIflES-NEWS :.-
hence. The ;1 tion to your columns in today's Daily
The streets of Ann Arbor re- n i apt
ustoms lead- ! con rning a paanAM oromme the
ation of the sounded today to the tread of march- cheering at athletic contests. After:GH A m B 0 -0 K E
Seniors in ing feet. The spirit of loyalty was on Iyears of silent revolt, it is neseccary
es in a truly Boys-h u n d reds of them-with "Deminimis non curat lev." For BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAQONAL
of1 thhni eaaderett:vaace ahremonstrance.
rk of senior- sn sthose who don't know, that simply i 1 1 i i 111111111111111111111'1[11111111111!11111.11R11t111i11111111 ttlil1111 1#11ttillill till]I 11 I #1111[[1111111
he classes of marking time to'patriotic airs played means that the law does not bother
iii... t.2 +c+, - - t-+- Ih_____________________________-._______________

24 when they appear for the first
time in their caps and gowns. The
annual swing-out is one of the most
worthwhile of Michigan traditions
and should be respected by the mem-
bers of the classes participating as
well as other groups of the Univer-
sity. Freshmen usually ignore the
traditional dignity of the swing-out
procession by neglecting to remove
their pots. This in itself seems a
triviality, but if they have the proper
envy of the position of the seniors
they would feel it incumbent upon
themselves to show their respect for
the superior attainments of the sen-
iors.
Following in quick succession for
the rest of the year will, be many
other happenings of more or less
significance involving those about to
graduate. Many would like the op-S
portunity of participating, especially
those who will receive their degrees
the following August. They feel that
the attitude of the University in re-
fusing them this privilege is not only
unfortunate, but inexcusable. They
cannot understand any reason why
such opportunities should bedenied
them simply because they are not
to. be graduated at the conventional
time.
In the case of the majority of the
so-called traditions it would prob-
ably make little or no difference
either to themselves or the University
whether or not they took part, but
in the actual awarding of the degree
1.it would be mockery to give such
students blank diplomas. The cere-
monies of graduation have a certain
tinge of solemnity which would be re-
moved if in some cases the award
of the diploma were mere fiction.
Those who are to be awarded diplo-
mas in August may rightly envy the
June graduates their participation in
all of the attendant ceremony, but
they should remember that the award
of blank diploias at random would
take away any real worth the cere-
mony possesses.

by the band, invaded the downtown
district. They were boys who en-
joyed pranks, who liked to frolic, and

with trifles.. Contemplating the max-
im I am persuaded strongly not to
continue this letter. However the trifle

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laugh, and be merry, but they wore with which I am concerned has be-
a serious mien his afternoon. Their come inflated beyond all measure. I
eyes flashed with pride, there was an speak, of course, of cheering and cheer
earnestness about their gait. They leading. Let it be remembered that we
realized the meaning of this pageant are attending college in the year of
of which they were a part; they knew grace, 1924. It is sorb e time since peg-
that they were giving a deionstra- top trousers and club hat-bands dis-
tion which was in reality a pledge of Y appeared. The copies of Stoverat
loyalty-loyalty to their parents, to Yale and Good Old Siwash are being
their home town, to God and their University of Michigan, in theory at
cony. tions. Also be it remembered that the
The invading host come, it saw, it least, is predicted upon intelligence.
conquered. The city surrendered Intelligence demands a moiety of dig-
gladly-to it boyhood, w repdre- nity and a little genuineness. Intellig-
glasented the citizenship of tomorrow. ence demands that the members of the
Eey boy wastking today, andr theUniversity do not hold themselves out
Every boy was a king today, and the Ssa netiigsetce
grw1ok adhmftihmg. as an entertaining spectacle.
grown folks paid him fitting homage. I wonder if there is a single mem-
The streets were lined with spec- ber of the University (including fresh-
tators as the parade wound its way men) except the cheer leading staff,
through the city. Some of these Ih'o isnotbrnd irritated in turn

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DETROIT UNITED LINES
EAST BOUND
Limiteds: S a. m., 9:10 a. ni. and
every two ho: p to 9:10 p. m.
Express : 7 a. mn., 8 a.,in. and e vuy#
two hours to 8 p. .m. d
Locals: 7 a. m., 8:55 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:5 p. m.,
11 p. m. To Ypsilant! only, 11:40
p. m., 12:25 a. m. and 1:15 a. m.
WElni BOU~D)
Limiteds: 8:47 ia. m. and every two
hours to a:,v p. m.
Express (making local stops): 9:C
a. m. and every two hours to 9:50
P. 1.
$.+eals: ,7:50 a. M., 12:10 a. m.

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MAY
S. A. T. N. T. F. S.
1 2 31
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 10 17
IS 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 !N2~ 9 30) 31

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tar edan

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spectators cheered, others remained
silent but their countenances re-
flected emotions they did not voice.
Tears crept down the faces of many,
but they were tears of pride. If there
was a prson in Ann Arbor whose

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ican tour of the Moscow Artl
er players. This week they are
ng in Detroit and next week, they
play their last American engage-
in New York City. Then they
return to Russia and Americans
lose, perhaps forever, the oppor-
y of seeing the work of these
rs which so clearly interprets'
pirit of modern Russian litera-
and culture.
di from the long line of tradi-f
which is behind the company of
doscow theater and their close
tce with modern Russian literary
ments and literary geniuses the
rs are individual studies in them-
s and the company, as a whole,
marvel for the general unity of
y' which prevails.
dents and residents of Ann
r have been particularly fortun-
uring the Detroit theatrical sea-
which is now closing in the op-
nities that have been afforded
for seeing great dramatic talent
his visit of the Moscow Art The-
players is one of the most worth
E NORTHERN ORATORICAL
LIEAGUJE
night Michigan will be host to
Northern Oratorical league for
rst time since 1918. The league
e of the largest of its kind em-
ng six universities whose total
iment would surpass the 60,000
. The location of the annual
sts rotates among the member
rsities, making the rounds every,
ears.
s means that a generation and
if of students enter and leave'
versity between the visits of the
e contests. Tonight in Hill au-
ium the present students of the
ersity will have their only oppor-
r of attending a Northern Ora-
A league contest in Ann Arbor,
will be 1930 before the contest
s here again.
higan welcomes this opportunity
atertain these men who have
n themselves the best orators
eir respective schools. It is

GLEANINGS1
By A.E.P.
THE WHIRLWIND OF POLITICS
There is an old proverb that change
of pasture makes fat calves. If
change of front makes a good poli-
tician, Mr. Lloyd George should soon
be in office again. The, elusive Welsh-1
man never fails to astonish his audi-
ence by his passion for changing his
mind. Mr. Lloyd George, M. P. at-
tacks the position taken by Mr.
Lloyd George, Prime Minister. Then
Mr. Lloyd George, lecturer, reverses
nearly all the positions of Mr. Lloyd
George, peace delegate. Finally Mr.
Lloyd George journalist, undermines
all the opinions of Mr. Lloyd George,"
Member of Parliament, Prime Minis-
ter, lecturer, literateur, peace dele-
gate and' editor.
His latest spasm revolves around
the British debt to the United States
It appears that he has discovered, in
the words of the old saw, that "a good
honest man, nowadays, is but a civil
word for a fool." He announces that
Great Britain made a mistake to pay
her debt to the United States, and hej
denounces those who made that settle-
ment, using the argument that the
debtor who pays loses a good oppor-
tunity to save a needed penny. Mr.
Lloyd George seems to disregard the
great principle which has helpedI
maintain the commercial supremacy
of his country-its financial integrety.
In certain countries the phrase "on
the word of an Englishman" is used
to denote absolute reliability. Bri-
tain's credit remains good because,
contrary to the advice of the nimble-,
minded Mr. Lloyd George, Britain's'
bond is always honored.
-AND THE SCHOLAR IN POLITICS
Unless wit and sense and brilliant
intelligence and long thought on the
problems and policies of democracy
are considered disqualifications for
membership in the Indiana Legisla-
ture, the people of Indiana ought to
be glad to elect Mr. Meredith Nichol-
son for State Senator. Mr. Nicholson
wants the democrats to nominateI
him for that office. His platform isS
strong, simple and original. He pro-

soul was not stirred by the spectacle
he could not have been along the line
of march today.
Washington, who was covering this
great pageant for the Daily, reports
that this latter sentene is an exagger-
ation. It is his idea that the eyes of
the Times News man were so,
blurred with tears that he could not
be expected to give an accurate ac-
count of the affair.
Thils Spae Reserved For Junius
Another letter from AN UNKNOWN
FRIEND informs us that the Junius
had an attack of sleeping sickness
on a railroad track and will be un-
able to dictate for a few days.
We are beginning to believe that
Junius' friends, like Mr. Sherman's,
are a good deal more entertaIning
than he is himself. But we'll saV
the space for a few days.
Oh, you do hey? Well if you aren't
a clever kid!
LET TER
Dear old Towles-(or is it Fowls
or Scowles-really I never can seem
to get that topping name of yours-
apologies if I haven't the right one).
Anyhow our room-mate came home
the other night with a black, black
eye-but we didn't notice being I
asleep. When whe woke to the glor-
ous vision (we've been long aspiring
to give him one ourselves) we just
hab. and hahed and rah rahed.
He rolled over, popped open his
good eye and with his usual romping
wit-
"There's many a black, black eye
they-say but none so bright as mine,!"
And after a while it came to me,
that that particular line is from the
"May Queen"-but tomorrow is the
first day o' May.
PERSNICKER
Judging from the diction, usage,
and punctuation, we should say that
this letter was from a him. There
were a lot of dashes-all of which
we have carefully preserved in our
prsentaon of the matter. You may
Judge for yourselves, cher publique-
* * *
Perhaps we said something the
other day about Denizen's resolution
to choose a song for their Society.
All the members were ordered to
submit 3 stanzas in alternating iam-
bic tetrameter and trimeter (to .da
toda tada, tada tada tada); these
were to be judged and the best one
set to music.
Here is the first one done:
DENIZENS' SONG
I'm proud to be a Denizen,
Handsome and brave and bright;
The Denizen is always found
Striving to do what's right.
The Denizens are firmly bound
By ties that ne'er can part;
Each member loves the rest of them
With all his little heart.

by the ubiquitous cheer leader and
his exhortations. Is it imperative that
the University shall excell in this art?
Why not allow Ohio State to be su-
preme in the art of waving a flag in
the cheering section? Why not dele-
gate the part of the chorus in the
Greek tragedy to the University of I-
linois? Why not surrender the role of
the giant Polyanna to Northwestern or
Purdue? If there are any reasons'
against such -policy I do not know
them nor have I ever known anyone
who could tell them to me. There is,
of course, the usual sob about the spir-
it of Michigan which must be sustain-
ed at all odds. But I wish to inquire
whether the intangible something, thel
sporadic enthusiasm which is termed
the spirit of Michigan, is based upon
the efforts of a uniformed troups of
trained acrobats who are dedicated
to the idea that organized cheering is
one way of winning football games or
debates. It is doubtful. This much is
certain, if organized cheering were
abandoned the spectator at an athletic
contest would be permitted to enjoy
the game.
'24L

NOTICE
FELT HAT SALE
in order to close out all Spring
Felt Htats before Straw fiat time
we are making the follo'wing sac-
ri"ices:"
All $'.50 Hats Now........$3.00
All 4.00 Mats Now.......3.50
All 4150 Hats Now........"175
All 5.00 Hats Now ....... 4
Lots of Large Sizes
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard St. Phone 1792
(Where D. V. R. Stops at State)
AI)RIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS LINE
Central Time (Slow Time)
Lease Chamber of Commerce
Week Days Sundays
6:45 a. m. 6:45 a.
2:45 P.m. :45 p.m.
,AS. H. ELLIOTT, Proprietor
shone 926-M Adrian, Mich.
Daily classified for real results.
WHEN YOU WISH
FLOWERS
PHONE 115
Cousins &Hall
611 . UNIVERSITY
YOU WILL BE PLEASED WIYII
THE WAY WE TAKE CARE OF
YOU.

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TH E NUINE
WHITE STAR

GASOLINE

SOLD AT

Abbott Gasoline Co.
Ann Arbor Taxi Co.

I

the stalwart little car at a low price.
See them at our show rooms.
Det roit Durant Co.
327 S. MAIN ST.

. .

: 7

Ti TIM RE
BY ".

In/

Buick Sales Co.
S. A. Elsifor
Hertler Bros.
F rank Stahl Garage

Maynard aC Williams
East Liberty St.
Huron at Ashley
North First St.
South Ashley St.

I

Dexter

TONIGHT: The Cercle FrancaIs
Spresents "Le Medecin Magre LDiby
M.olere and "L' Aiiglais Tel Qu'on Le
Parle" by Tristan In Sarah Caswell
Angeri Hall at 8 oeloek.-.
GEORGE BERNARD ' SHAW in.
"Man and Superman" has undoubted-
ly composed one of his most brilliant
works, comparable only to the gigan-
tic fantasy of "Caesar and Cleopatra"
and "Fanny's First Play." The story.
itself is of weirdest .nature, starting
out in the first act as a kind of
Brieux sexy problem play, only to
end the entire dilemna as an ob-
vious travesy 23 minutes later. From
there the lay winds to the romantic
melodrama of a Spanish gypsy
camp and to the famous Don--Juan-
in-Hell dream scene.
This interlude in itself has evoked
the greatest discussion, partly be-
cause of its startling picture of
Hell as a refuge from the boredom
of Heaven and mainly Ljacause it
has absolutely nothing to do with
the main theme of the drama. In
the present production only a relative
fragment of the episode will be given,
chiefly, I suppose, in order that you
may go home sometime before twelve
or one o'clock.
The last act becomes sheer farce
from "The Brothers Karamzoff,"
with the heroine illogically pursu-
ing the distracted hero, the famous
John Tanner. The final conclusion,
obviously, is that maan's superman
must be woman, and there the cur-
tain falls: the play is ended.
"T H E BROTHERS KARAMA,-
ZOFF," a review by John Garling-
house.
The inerpretation of six scenes
from "The Brothers Karamazoff,"
a novel by Fyrodor Dostoievsky, at
the Wednesday night performance of
the Moscow Art theater players re-
vealed he hopes, the ideas, yes, even
the soul of a sensitive people, as

THE ABBOTT GASOL

mwwmmmww

Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Ady.

1'atronize Da

This advertisement, submitted by J. C. Beesley, Jr., of Princeton University, was aw
fourth prize in the Postum Cereal Company's intercollegiate advCrtising co

Now I ask you -

When you
Oversleep and
Miss breakfast
And haven't
But about
Ten or fifteen.
Minutes to
Get to class
And you
Throw your
Clothes on and
Run to the

Big bowl of
POST TOASTIES
And cream-
You don't
Have to wait
As it's always
Ready to
Serve-
And you
Hurriedly eat
Those delicious
Crispy flakes

Just on time
And in a
Good humor
Because
You've had
A little

*2
Extra sleep
And a most
Delightful and
Gratifying
Breakfast
OH BOY!

"U

The chapter here has always done
Toward Michigan its duty;
And down the ages goes our call;
"Hurrah for Truth and Beauty!"
Respectively submitted
Id Est Ex Post Facto

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