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May 02, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

~DAY

/

~fr i4an

:3ati

31

and
WESTERN CONFE
EDITORIAL ASSO'

155

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1924

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE,

F

[0 TOWNS
N900 BELT
S PLACE TOTAL
AT MORE
K 111
LINA WORSE
EAN OTHERS

erty Damage Esthnated To ReachI
rell Over Ten Million: Troops
On Guard
lanta, Ga., May 1.-(By AP)-
i and rural communities, strick-
y an epidemic of tornadoes that
d ruthlessly through seven sou-
i states yesterday were recovering
ly to-night. Relief workers frona
nized services and volunteers had
task well under way in scores
ilages leveled.
ports gathered placed the totall
i list at 111. There still was no1
ite estimate of the personsin-
1but belief persisted that the
er would reach 500.
roperty Damage In Millions
operty damage will be muchj
er than at first anticipated, it was
ated today. The only estimate
opted-that of $10,000,000-prob-

CLOCK TURNS BACK WhEN
. BOYS FILL CAMPUS WALKS{
I The campus clock stopped, inE
fact to all appearances it had
been turned back several years,{
shortly after 3 o'clock yesterday
afternoon. The cause of thisE
illusion was the presence ofE
swarms of small, dressed-up{
{ little boys who invaded the pre-
cincts or their elders at about {
that hour on their way to Hill
E auditorium where the boys' Loy-
alty parade passed.{
One passerby was heard to
remark: "They're a great little
Ibunch, and riot much different {
from the ones that are generally I
I { one the campus except for size."
TWELVE INITIATED
INTO TAU BETA P1
F. N. Calhoun, Instruclor Of Mechanic.
al Engineering Department, Also
Given Honor
BURSLEY GIVES PRINCIPAL
ADDRESS OF THE EVENING
Twelve juniors and one instructor
were initiated by Tau Beta Pi, nation-
al honorary engineering fraternity
yesterday afternoon, following which
ceremony a banquet was held a the
Union. Dean Joseph A. Bursley, was

11 be
Caro

lsped.
a was the worst strick-
a states visited by the
,ross workers and oth-
iderson's and at Hor-
neat and state troops
Property damage at
ie was $750,000. The
as disclosed the tol-.

ths; South Carolina 81,
Alabama 11, North Carol-
sana 1, Arkansas 1.
port More Deaths,
nal deaths were reported
ibia wher'e 2 injured per-
n hospital aid at Robert-
C. where belated reports
-ister striking tbere,
Ines were'said to have been
ad an appeal for aid was
Mayor Cox. One uniden-

the principal speaker of the evening,
giving an address on "Tau Beta Pi."
J. W. Hostrup, '24E, acted as toast-1
master during the evening, while Rip-
ley Shemm, '24E, gave the address of
welcome' to the new men. Stewart
fulse, '25E, responded for the'Initi-
ates. More than 60 members were
present, including several representat-
ives from the Alpha chapter of the
society at MV. A. 0..
The instructor who was received as
an associate member was Floyd N.
Calhoun of the mechanical engineer-
ing department. He was a graduate
of Louisana State college in 1916, re-
ceiving his degree in mechancial en-
gineering.
He first came to the University in
the summer of 1921, when he took'
graduate work in that .line of study.
September 1922 he was appointed asI
a teaching assistant for a year and
this year has served as an instructor.-
He has recently been appointed by the
Regents to retain that post for 1924-
25
The students, all junior engineers,
who were initiated yesterday, are: G.
E. Bosserdet, W. H. Cooper, F. M.
Freeman, W. S. Hearding, S. H. lse,
C. L. Hulswit . W. Reed, D. 3.Reese,
K. B. Robertson, R. S. Scribner, H. A.
Sheridan, W. W. Spanagal.
NOMINATIONS ANNOUNCED
FO0R OORRICAL0BOA RD0

School Heads
To Gather For
Meeting Today
Meeting for the first time, the su-
perintendents and general school ad-
ministrators for the various Michigan
schools will hold a conference here
today. They plan to discuss educa-
tional problems in. their fields.
Maintenance costs and prevailng
rates for school buildings in the mat-
ters of lighting, water and gas; ed-
ucation of the public to look upon tax-,
es as a savings instead of as an as-
sessment; and methods of budget
making for school systems will be
some of the subjects discussed.
The superintendents will also raise
questionsnas to the methods to be
adopted in obtaining better trained I
teachers, the raising of standards of
life certificates, the value of the mus
ic memory contests, plans for making
the School of Education more service-
able, and the practicability of adopt-
ing a simple. and effective teaching
rating that might be uniform through-
out the state.
Prof. George Strayer of the New
York Teachers' college will be pres-
ent and will conduct a number of the,
meetings. Members from the faculty
of the School of Education will alsoI
attend and will assist in solving some
of the problems.
CCNE DTE OF HONOS
C6OVOCTION TO MAY 131
Because of a conflict in the ar-
rangements for another campus fun-
ction, the date for the Honors convo-
cation, originally set for the after-
noon, of May 8, has been changed to
4:15 o'clock Tuesday May 13, in Hill
auditorium, according to announce-
ment made yesterday by Dr Arthur
G. Hall, who is in charge of the ar-
rangements during the absence of
Dean Hugh Cabot of the medical
school.
President Marion L. Burton will de-
liver the main address at the convo-
cation, at which the highest ten per-
cent of each of the senior
be present. Holders of graduate
school fellowships, and winners of
prizes and medals in journalism, ora-
tory, and various other departments
will be invited to attend the function.
YOST TO-GIVE ADRES
BEFORE CCAPGOLUMNI1
Chicago, May 1.-(By AP)-Field-
ing H,. Yost will be one of the speakers
at the dinner of the University of
Michigan club at Chicago Friday
evening, May 9-.
lie will discuss the building of men,
which he claims, "is the purpose of
all education."
"Schools and colleges can best dis-
charge their responsibility by stim-
ulating simultaneously the four-sid-.
ed man. The head, heart and body
must be nurtured to the end that tie
boy may have a clean jntellect, a sound
character and an active, healthy virile
body.
NAMECOMMITTEE OINr
Members of the nominating com-I
mittee of the Student Christian associ-
ation have been chosen. They are:
J. K. Dunn, '24, chairman, Harold
Steele, W2E, John Detar, '24, Rensi

'Likert, '26 and Milo Oliphant, '24E. .
Petitons to apply for places on the
ballot as candidates in the campus el-
ections, May 13 will be received today
l or next weeek.

BELGIANS ACT AS
GO-BET WEENS ON
DAWES PROPOSAL1
THEUNIS AND HVINANS ARRIVE IN
LONDON TO GET PREMIER
MACDONALDIS VIEWS
WOULD SMOOTH OVER
ALLIED DIFFERENCES
British Urge Removal Of Debt Control;
From Hands Of Reparations
Commilssion
London, May 1.-(By AP)-Premier
Theunis and Foreign Minister Hy-_
Imans of Belgium arived in London to-1
night on the second of the visits they
are paying to France, England and
Italy to ascertain the views of the el-
lied governments on methods for mak-
Ing the Dawes plan effective.
.Fresh from Paris, the Belgian em-
missaries who are assuming their
old role as go-betweens in the allied
negotiations, will be able to ;seek~
Premier Poincare's mind as well as
their own when they meet Prime Min-
ister MacDonald at Cheqluers Courts
tomorrow. In return, they will hear
the British thesis, which, whilehnot
new indicates an outcropping of the!
old Anglo-French differences, forgot-
ten since the British resigned themsel-
ves to the occupation of the Ruhr.
Mr. MacDonald, it is understood, will
inform the Belgians that the British
government would like to see the
business-like beginning which the ex-
pert made, continued in carrying out
their recommendations, and therefore
will propose to the allies when the pro-
per time comes, that application of the
expert's proposal be taken out of the
hands of the reparations commission
as far as is possible and put into ef-
feet by a new allied agreement with
the Germans which could be obtained
by direct negotiations.

I

MILLKA TOIVEI.BOYS' MARCH I N
SPECHTOMORROW' L OYALTY PARADE

In regard to the present issue, the
so-called Poetry number, one hesitates
to say too much. There is a great
plethora of sentiment about the hills,
and the lost roads to the hills, and the
stern mountains, the blue sea and sky,
on and on it runs until everyone real-
ly is a trifle weary.
The majority of the versification is
from bad to worse, extremely conven-
tional, extremely tiresome; but there
are several contributions-and it is
ridiculous to hope for more than a
few significant pieces in any magazine
-which seem to create the required
lyric atmosphere that instinctively
satisfied one.

ea economy oI means. 7ore lan MS,
there seems to be a fairly obvious idea
to it and fortunately no hopeless
search for subtlety.
As for the rest.... T may be very
wrong in my opinion.- One contribu-
tion, however, one "Oblivion" seems
uniquely bad. To be fair, I can quote
the majority of the line-and writing
them as the prose that they are-
which run like this: "Smoke, blue and
brown, in a thin wavering thread, as-
cends from the burning tip of my cig-
arettee...'.Smoke, blue and brown,
rushes swiftly to the sky, and spreads
out into a transparent negation."
You like it? R.B.II.

Winner of Nobel Prize To Speak
Phi Beta appa Initiation
Banquet

At1

IS NOTED AUTHORITY ON
MODERN PHYSICS PROBLEMS
Dr. Robert Andrews Millikan, the
second American to win the Nobel
prize in physics and the contributor of
some of the greatest discoveries in the
field in recent years, will speak at theI
annual initiation banquet of Phi Beta
Kappa, honorary international schol-
astic society, at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow

Whimsies Criticized As Poor
Attempt At "Highbrow" Poetry
There is something quite wrong with "Mountains" by V. Carleton Havens
Whimsies. There is an air of heavy is one of these. "Anticipation" by
solmnity about it and everything iP Mary Cooley, '26, another. I am never
so deadly in earnest. It stands as quite sure of Miss Cooley's verse.
Michigan's literary Magazine, the sole Generally I miss the point-although
surviving beacon light of local "Kul-l that is more due to my lack of appre-
tur", desperately staving off the fate ciation, I suppose, thankhers-and
of the Sunday Magazine. The fact is, while it may not be good poetry, at
it is trying to be highbrow-an un- Ileast it certainly is not bad poetry.
pardonable sin at a university, where I "Paradox" by Dorothy Tyler is very
the slightest interest in things art-|excellent. There is something fresh
isticTer and beautiful results in every.
'ind ofnostracism. sand unstilted about it, and an unaffect-
n fnnnm M of mon Xfnn thn thiC

Rand, Scouts, Military Org'anizatlons
Reviewed By Burton, Yost,
From Stand
TODAY'S PLANS INCLUDE
SPECIAL RAiDIO PROGRAM
Hundreds of school children from
Ann Arbor and the outlying districts
marched in the Loyalty parade held
yesterday to mark the climax of Ann
Arbor's observance of Loyalty day for
Boy's Week. Other units of the par-
ade were the University band and the
"M" club, the Boy Scouts, militaryl

NORTHERN OH9
WILL TILT TON
SIX CONFERENCE SCOI
CLASH AT EIGHT O'Cl
. FOR VERBAL HONOR
WINNER WILL RECE
TESTIMONIAL O
111ill Auditorium To Be S
Annual Battle Of Words Foi
Time Since 1918
Orators representing mor
60,000 mid-western students w
at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill au
in the thirty-fourth annual
of the Northern Oratorical
The contest has not been held
Arbor since 1918, and will not
here again until 1930.
There are six Conference
in the league, Northwestern
sity and the Universities of W
Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota ,an
gan. Of these Northwestern 1
gan's greatest rival, having
firsts to 10hof the University
William Schier, '24, will ri
the University in thus cont
will be the first speaker, his
being "Is Progress a Delusioi
second speaker will be North%
well known woman orator, Ali
son. Her subject is "Saviors
The Wisconsin speaker, Ha
Cranefield, will follow with his
"Justice for France."
Levingston To Speak
Max Levingston, who will r
the University of Iowa, wi
speak on "Social Control c
ution." He will be followed
Illinois speaker, Morris Sosti
will speak on "Wanted-A R
Idealism." The last speaker
Llewellyn Pfan-Kuchen, UnivE
Minnesota. He will speak c
Control of Progress.
Each speaker will speak on
ject, which of his own choice,
than 15 minutes. Stanley B.
University of Minnesota, nation
ident of Delta Sigma Rho,
honorary forensic fraternity

o be broadcasted from
New York, at 8:30 o'-
w night, by station
of his talk on music
night of March 27, Mr.
an experiment in
nging" by radio. Thej
was to prove his belief
eople everywhere could
i the same song at the
in tune and time with

FRENCH CLUB WILL GIVE
LEMEDCINMAIGRE LUIB
The eighteenth annutaj Frech~~
"Le Medecin Malgre Lui" by M61Th A
together with a curtain raiser, "L -I
Anglais Tel Qu'on Le Parle" by Ber-
nard Trfistan, both comedies, will beI
presented this evening in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall at eight o'clock. ;
The plays are under the auspices of
the Cercle Francais and are in charge1
of Mr. John H. Muyskens, assisted by
Dr. Jean B. Cloppet, Mr. Robert V.
Finney, Mr. Anthony J. Jobin, and.
Prof. Herbert A. Kenyon of the Ro-
mance Languages department.
The cast of "L'Anglais Tel Qu'on
Le Parle" will include Samuel Ben-
iil& as Eugene, T. J. Montgomery as
I-ogson, Robert Henderson as Julien,
Miriam Mansfield as Betty, Mark Ire-I
land as Le Garcon, Edward Parnall as
L'Inspecteur, Everett Tobin as thej
Policeman, and Germaine JBaer as La
Caissiere.
All members or associate members1
of the Cercle Francais will be ad-
mitted on presentation of their'mem-
bership cards, and single tickets at
fifty cents may be purchased at the
door.

r
a
r'
'
,
I.,
k".
{
.
',
I
1,
't .

night in the main dining room of the organizations, and local civic organiz-
Union. Professor Milikan's subject ations.1
will be, "The Significance of Modern From the reviewing stand near Hill
Scien" auditorium, Coach Fielding H. Yost,
Science. general chairman for tile week's pro-
The famous physicist took his bach-r Prsintu
elor degree at Oberlin college in 1891 angra; P resid ew, wi ton.
and was there after awarded degrees and Mayor George E. Lewis, with 0th-
b Columbia, Berlin, Northwestern er local represntatives, paid their res-
Amherst and Dublin universities. He pects to the boys. Coach Yost, who
AsmhersthandDublin unibersitie s. e!sponsored the Loyalty essay contest
is the author of a number of books, held recently among the Ann Arbor
among the most recent being "The El- Ischools, awarded prizes to the winnersj
ectron" in 1917. Last year Professor 'at the start of the parade.
Millikan was awarded the Nobel prize Floats in- the parade were presented
in physics for his distinguished work by local organizations. The Ann Ar-?
in that field, notably for his proof bor chamber of commerce depicted the
that electricity has an atomic struct- city as it was 100 years ago; another
ure and for his measurement of the float represented the spirit of '76.f
unit charge of the electron. He shares Although yesterday's program marks
the honor of being tone of IAlhogheeseda'sprgammak
tAmerin o wbingthisonorwithe only the high spot of the week, special cer-
Americans to win this honor with A. emonies will continue today and to-
A. Michelson who was similiarly ,m row. Today has been set aside as
awarded in 1907. "Boy's Day at Home", and in the
Dr. Milikan is now associated with' evening a radio program will be broad-
the Norman Bridge laboratory of1 cast in accord with the spirit of the
physics at the California Institute of day. Coach Yost will speak on "Play-
Technology, Pasadena, and is chair- ing the Game," the University quar-
man of the administrative council of tette will sing, and winners in the
that organization. ILoyalty essay contest will read their
Dean Henry M. Bates of the law composition. The program will be
school, president of the Michigan broadcasted at 7 o'clock from station
chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, will act as
D 99 W0BC, wave length 280 meters.
toastmaster for the occasion. Tick- We8
jets are $1.50 and will be sold at the

bers who have
dent speaker.
F. N. Rarig of
of Wisconsin,
IH Wilbert of
of Northweste
of the -public
Each judge wi
own on a pol

The winner of ti
ceive a $100 testi
endowment given I
Frank O. Lowden
the speaker taking
a $50 prize from th
Nwill also be an hon
The Northern Or
founded in 1890 tl
of Professor Trueb
the "daddy" of tb
time there were o
,Michigan, Northwe
and Oberlin. Iowa j
1894. In 1896 the
cago Joined, but

visible chor-
songs, begin-
A few sec-f
ent was com-
deluged with

the success of the first
haw, who was formerly'
tropolitan Opera com-
York, and who present-
"Cosi Fan Tutte" and
in Ann Arbor recent-
iced the second sing for
Lt.
nce, Mr. Hinsliaw an-
ntrance of the Univer-
use into the radio field,
me as his song leading.
invited to drop into the
w night, it was announc-
Mr. Hinshaw singing
1 as it is picked up, by

Nominations for the Oratorical
Board for 1924-25 were announced last
night by the nominating committee
of the present board. They are, for
president, F. H. Backstrom, '26L, and 1
E. H. Salzman, '25; for vice-president,
W. C. Dixon, '26, and B. B. Sibley, '25;
for secretary, Elizabeth VanValken-
burg, '26, and Beata C. Wagner, '25;
and for treasurer , J. J. Dunn, '26, and
A. E. Sawyer, '26.
In adition to these four officers, who
will be elected at the campus elections
on May 13, the new board will elect
four delegates-at large, and each of
the literary societies will elect one
member making in all, 11 studentt
and three faculty members.
BANDUTO I UUCUONCEIT
INKALAMAZOOTONIGHTI

QUAKE SHOCKS REPORTED4
BY ST, LOUIS OBSERVER',1
St. Louis, May 1, (By A. P.)-
Violent earthquake shocks were re-
ported on the seismograph of St.-
Louis university from 2 until 3:01
o'clock this afternoon. Brother
Reuptel, in charge of the instrument
estimated the' disturbance was at a
distance of 2100 miles, in a south-I
easterly direction. This, he said,
would be in the neighborhood of
Porto Rico.
NO TRACE OF MARTIN
EPORT OF US., CRUISER

qi
Cu

nion immediately before the ban-
iet.
AZAMAN PEAK ONFORENSIC CONVENTION
Delta Sigma Rho, national honorary,
E U U U forensic fraternity, opened it's annual
convention last night with a banquet
"Th. inner Develanment of Eglish in the Union. Tonf P .B. Blanshard

her place b
t that time

to

WERSON TO SUCCEED
BARRETT AS MINISTER
Dr. Merle H. Anderson will succeed
L. A. Barrett, D. D., as minister
the Presbyterian church of this
y, delivering his first sermon Sun-'
y forenoon.
Doctor Anderson comes from Mor-
town, New Jersey, where he has
en engaged as secretary of the eas-
n district of the New Era Movement
the Presbyterian church. He grad-
ted from Washington-Jefferson col-
ge in 1893 and McCormick Theolog-
AI seminary in 1896.
The retiring minister, Doctor Bar
t, is moving to Wooster, Ohio, where
will persue Philosophical research'

Sixty members of the University
band will leave for the concert trip
to Kalamazoo at 11:45 today. They
will be met at the depot by the Ki-
wanis club whose guests they will be
while in the city. Dinner with the!
Kiwanis club in the Park-American
hotel will be followed by a short par-
ade around the city.
The main concert will be at 8:00
o'clock in the armory. The long clas-
sical program which has featured in
the past will give place to a lighter
program of strictly popular appeal. If
this experiment proves successful the
spring band bounce will probably be
of the same type.
Games Chairmen
Will Meet Today

Bowling Season
Closes At Union
Bowling activities of Michigan stu-
dents for the present have been dis-
continued with the closing yester-
day of the alleys in the Union. It is
customary for the Union manage-.
ment to shut down the bowling alleys
every year between May 1 and Octo-
ber -. due to the lack of interest in
the sport during tihe warm weather
months.
New York, May 1.-The Zayas ad-.
ministration in Cuba has imprisonedj
all suspected revolutionists in Havana
as result of the revolt of soldiers in
Santa Clara province according to in-
forniation Gustavo Gutierres of the

Literature" was the subject of Prof.I
Louis Cazmian's lecture yesterday af-
ternoon. Ile traced briefly the history
of tendencies in English literature
since Chaucer, giving the main char-'
acteristics of each age. "Intellect and
imagination form the whole field of
possibilities for artists," said Profes-
sor Cazmian. "An age of realism
always follows an age of romanticism.
"Fatigue is the mainspring of liter-'
ary change," according to Professor
Cazmian. "Literary tendencies do not
operate as a pendulum, but as a spir-
fal. Romanticism of one age is en a
different plane from romtnaicism of
another. A law of human nature is
involved in this fickleness, which is
the power of consciousness to accumu-
late past experience.
"The greatest writers of tpday are
characterized by a keeness of analysis,
concreteness, and directness of per-
ception. This is a regression toward
the systematic ideal of classicism,"
said Prof.' Cazamian.
Professor Moore
Confined To Hone?

JU G1 ~ 1l. LU. ,- . U )aio a
of the philosophy department gave the
principal address. His subject wasI
"The Oratorical Mind." .
Stanley B. Houck, national presi-
dent of the organization, spoke on the
work of the convention. Prof. T. C.
Trueblood of the public speaking de-
partnient delivered "Some Remarks."
F. H. Backstrom, '26L, gave the ad-
dress of welcome for the Michigan
chapter. G. E. Bigge of the economics
department acted as toastmaster.
The convention will hold business
1 meetings this morning and this after-
noon in the reading room of the Un-
ion. The delegates will attend the
Northern Oratorical contest in Hill
auditorium tonight.
EDMUNDS TALS BEFORE
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The contest is held
school every year, maki
every six years. Last yi
at the University of. Mi
old BerOlzheimer of Nor
was reputed to be the
in the Conference last
place in this contest by
vote of the judges.
Gerrit Demmink, '23, t1
presentative, took thir(
contest last year wit
"The Mind in Thrall."
The contest is open
Persons attending -are
in their seats before 8
contest will start prop
will be admitted to I
during an oration.
Tau Sigm I
Names 7

Bremerton, Wash., May 1.-(By A.P.)
-A wireless message from the Coast
Guard. cutter Algonquin at Dutch Har-
bor, Alaska, received about noon to-
day said no trace had been found of
Major Martin, missing around-the-
world aviator, and that it was hoped
he had turned back towards Chignik{
whence he flew yesterday.

Tau Sigma Delta, 1
nity in architecture,
pledging of the followi
men from the archit
Jean C. Harrington,
Buell, '24, Laura L. E
neth C. Black, '25, L
'25, Drothy Eggert,'
Simpson, '25. It has
tom of this organiza
twice a year, and to h

STwo Conference
Teams Defeated

Prof. C. C. Edmunds, of the econo-
mics department, addressed the mem-
bers of the University chamber of com-
merce last night and opened a series

1

i

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