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April 22, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-04-22

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LY RAIN 0OR
TODAY

I

F,

Sir qAau

:4Iait Ij

send
WESTERN COINFEI
EDITORIAL ASSOCIA

i

XXXIV. No. 146

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 22, 1924

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE

a

__._

CINCINNATI, 9T08
SOUTHERN BASEBALL TRIPS ENDS
WITH VICTO*RY OVER OLD
OPPONENTS
BLOTT W OUTSTANDING
STAR WITH TWO H1OM4ERS
3licligan, Worn Out After 1401mg jour-l
net-, Plays Ragged Bull, BAt-
ting 1Wins
Cincinnati, Ohio., April 21 .-Michi-
gan won the final gamie of their soutl-
ern invasion from the University of
Cincinnati 9 to S. It was a hectic
game from start to finish due to the
dust flurries which blew across the
field:
Jack Blott's stick was largely' re-.
sponsible for Michigan's runs. He
raised two in the stands for home..
runs and put a terrific drive 'through
short stop for a single. Blott hit the
longest ball seen on the local field
only to be declared a foul. The ball
completely cleared the stands in deep
left.
Michigan started the scoring in the
second when Blott hit for a home run'.
Wilson drove Giles and Haggerty in,
on his two base hit. Cincinnati camne
back in their half of the second and
touched Torrey for three hits and two
runs. They came back again in the
fourth with three runls that put them'
ahead. Bad baseball. on the part of
the Wolverines was largely responsi-
ble for these runs.
Markle, the Cincinnati twirler had
a hard time finding the plate ini the
seventh inning and Michigan touched'
him for two hits, two muefl walking and
a batter hit by a pitched ball for a
total of three runs.
The Wolverines showed the result of
their long trip and bad baseball was
prevalent thrioughout the game.. Sev-
eral times men were caught off th,
base When in good position to score.

Eleanora Duse, Famed Italian
Traeine ies In Pittsburgh
P'ittsburghi, April 21.=The farewell her with rases amid, frantic cheersi

MANY CHARGES AREIJAPAN BOYCOTTS
P FI[ B ,r R CIIU i .0g'SENATE C MITTEE[I N LFDEFENSE,

tour of Mine. Eleanora Duse In the
United States was her, farewell to0
earth. The famous Italian traged i-
'enne dlied at 2:30 a. nm. today at a jhotel
Swhere she had been confined ''o two,
weeks with an attack of 'influ,,nza.
0Th1e actress, termedl in c~lit alsth
world over as "Thre Magnificen t," and Il
once the betrothed of Gabrielle l)'An-
nunzio, gave her next to tihe last l)er-
formance in Detroit. She had been
Imaking an American tour and a ler
spending the winter on the Pacific
lCoast, traveled across the country to
!Detroit. There she became inalispos'e(1
and after her -ppeaarance Nerve April
5, contracted influenza. Her condi-
ion became critical April 9, but a.
steady improvement was noticed until
April 16, when she suffered a relapse.
Elonora Duse, ramous Italian trag-
edienne, emerged from fifteen years'
retirement as an actress at Turin,
ItayonMay 6, 1921, by appearing in
"Ibsen's "Lady of the Sea." Her ap-
pearance in public was the signal for
an enthusiastic' greeting from a dis-
tinguished audience which showereclI
Professor Sorokine Was Forced to
' Leave Home for Publishing
Book
WILL GIVE THREE L~ECVTURE S
ON RE VOLUTIONS IN GENERAL
Prof. Pitirime A. Sorokine, formerly
of the sociology department of
the. University of, Petrograd, will
deliver' University lectures here
this afternoon, tomorrow, and'
Thursday. , All of the ,lectures' will be,
Sgiven. at 4 o'clock. in ;Newberry zaudi-

for Italy, ".La Duse," as she was pop-

G4UARD) TELLS OF "PRIVI LEG4ES":
U IVEN\ TO IWEALTHY
('ONVICVTS

3

TOBACCO "MONOPOLY"
MAY BE INVESTIGATED,
Gillette 'Testifies in AllegediquorI
IDisamoeiartnces of, Ifepa riment
of 4ustice

JAPS, IN MASS MIEETING, SWEAR
TO SACRIFIC'E ALL F~OR
"PRESTIGE"
MOVE FOLLOWS PASSAGE
OF, JAP EXCLUSION ACT
lCyrus E. Woods, Amiiericiian Ainbha s
adtor, In Eijibo rrisin g Situation,
ai, Silent;

Regents Give
Burton $6,000,
Salry aise
President Marion L. Burton was
voted an increase in salairy from, $18,-
000 to $24,000 annutally by the Board
of Regents of the University. The ac-
tion was taken at' a meeting of the
board some time ago, but was not an-
nounced. Salaries of several of the
deans of the University were raised at
same time, it is reported, but the
names and amounts were not given
out. It was understood that the in-
crease was given to President Burton
because of the large amount of official}

SPEAKERS CHOSEN
FOR15TH ANNUA1
STEFAN'SSON\.VA DYKE. 1W'1
NEY, SKEYHILL L mSTRi
MUST FIND FOUR MORE
LECTURERS NEXT FA
"U ncle Henry," Well lKnowvn Public
and Fosdiek Will Appear on
Course

Box Score.
Michigan .AR. R
Deview, r. f......... 4 0
Baker, c.f... ...5 0
Bachman, 1. f....... 5 ,0
Slott,' c . ....... 4 3
Giles,'2b. ....... ,3' 2
Haggerty, 3b.....53
Dillniub ss.'....... 3 0
Wilson, 14b......... 3 1
Torrey, p........... 1 0
Shoesmithi, p........ 0 0
Jabloiiowski; p. ....0 0
*Kipke.......1 0
Totals 34 9
'shit for Torrey in sixth.f

11I
0
1
U
21.
0
0
0
0
0.
1.
11

Cincinnati AB
Houston, r. f. ....4
Hoy, 1. f. ......
Allen; c. f... ...5
Prather, 3b.......3
Valentiner, ss. .....4
Hynes 2b. ........ 4
Glasgow, lb. ......4
Bradford, c......
Markle,1). ......2
Soller,p .........1
*Corflelius.....1
Tiotals 36.

rI
1
0
0
1
1
0

toriumn.
~ A EProfessor 'Sorokine was forced to
0 U 2leave Russia after publishing a book
1 0 1 on "The Psychology of HMunger." This
0 0 0 s was the culmination of .a career whi( h
7 1 1 1 was filled with opposition to the ex-
2 '20 0 1sting government,_ which seemed tot
0" 5'0 be opposed to the natural and sociol-.
2 4 0 ogically. correct conditio~n of man.
.4 2 0 The su~bject folj'his lectur'e this af-
1 2 0 ternoon Willi be "The, Present State of
0 0 0 Russia.' Under this subject Profes-
0 1 0[ sor Sorokine, will make an. effort to
0 0 0 correct .soni , p, the popular miscoal-
27 17 4 ceptions about the present state of af-
fairs in. the land of revolution and+
bolshevism.
P0 A L{E His subject tomorrow afternoon will
1 1 01 be "Causes of Revolution, and the Per-
2 0 1s version of Human B~ehavior in Time of
2 0 0 Revolution." This, with his subject
1 1 0 for Thursday,. make up the matter
2 4 0 upon which Professor Sorokin's "pet"
33 0 :theories are founded. Ilie has forinul-
9 2' 0! ated some very definite ideas and for
7 2 0 ! nulae as to the hehavior of peoples
03 1 d uring revolution. Srkn
0 10 ;On Thursday PoesrSrkn
0",0, 0 "will speak on "The Influence of Revo-
27 17' 2 lution on the Biologic C'omlposition of
the Population. and its Vital Process-
es." It .was for the expounding of
3i 1 0-0 these ideas that this emninent socdial
2 1, 0-81 ogist was ;forced for leave Russia~. and
this .lecture promises to be full of in-
Markle.1 teresting details..
Home Sorokine has lectured at a great
Dilinan many American universities, among
Q bases: them being Vassar, the University of
Soller '3, } Wisconsin, and the University of l li=
nmith 2. nois. He has been, highly spoken oif
r, Giles. by several prominent ,Eastern educa-
tors who have heard him speak.
HTS During his stay in Ann Arbor, Pro-
f essor Sorokine will stay at the Union.
He will be under the special guidance
of NOON. A E. Wood of thesoilg

I okio, April 21.-(By A}-Japan- II1 dUL5i ILdALUjUL I Six of the ten numbers of the Or
Washington. April 21.-(By A. P.)-tdy-;(1 herfis cr-onnection with his wok torical association lectures series fi
Allegations of liquor disappearances at ( ( -i oneto it h psae- 1924-25 were announced last night by
4, s rby te UitedStaes Snat of he orethe public speaking department ani
ainanti-trust law prosecutions, and of bri ~ aeeP O .~ llfIf ciimno h omte o ik
3t " wr t ; ~~~~~~immigration bill brig Japeecir nofteom teeorpd-
prTlgsomeddto'iloaie f~ientrance into that ounltry T1he i ~~ ng Oratorical association speakers,
convicts' at Atlanta federal penten 'Japan Printing Asociation, at a ge-NH on his return from Florida.. This i;
+ laotI tiary were made today before the sen al-etng 01HvtdtopaeI the fifteenth year of the Jelctur
Elaoa uea etn edhrvtdWpaeHate Daugherty investigating commit-held6DI S G C 0b course.
ularly known, and for Gabriel d'An- tee. a boycott n all California goods. All. of the four remaining speakoer
nunzio, former poet-dictator of Fiume, Speaker Gillette of the house was' A two-hour conference between Professor in College of Architecture !will probably not be selected uniti next
(Cnine o ag iv)was allowed to open the hearing by1 Foreign Mliister Matsui andl Marquis Dies Suddenly Wile 'Visiting t al, as the committee, wvhich is madex
Ientrn an emphatic denial that any I Salonji, one of Japan's two elder Relatives u fPoesr relo,~.T
ntering Johnstoneozethebengineeringtsentoo1
everreahed im~and Chairman Iwhich protested against te1 cr s ERiR.W ige f teCaEchSan '
WO E O D IE vrrahdhi, yada oe h xl SERVCESWILL BE HELD AT S, Re .ge of the la schoole'ade
WD " ::I T 0 OR Houston Thompson' f the federalof Japanese from the United States,!,,11RESIDENVCE THIS ATERNOON i ,S. Rteev es otpoistia scenctre o.
tade commission, who will be heardI were other features in the Japanese-___ o lltesekrIutli ssr
1 aiha t 31ther s aeluni t mor d sirale
FOR LEAGUE FUNDS to greater extent later, began an a:- American immigration situation Cleeo rhtcue idStr nsaalbe
count of that body's endeavor to in- ,00 Attend Pro.eLuiaHomesBontobofth
uceody'thes detng partmenta, pri of wiljusticeelties Vilhjamur Stefasson, the famous
____Attorney General" Daugherty, to in- toa'masmeigwhcwsdyArl1,hlevitnrltvs Arctic explorer, will open the series
Apsril 29 Set For Opening of Irive stitute criminal proceedings under the under the auspices of several patrio- in Chicago. Funeral services will be sometime in the middle of October lp t i raiainRHouineeehl t2o'lc hsatrona h
Far 31Milon Dollar Fund Fr anti-trust law. pticedorgnath"is esolutio n-resihecat120o'co tsaftern attev.soehr taUiest ov
Leag ue Bullding During one brief dlip into the stua- pse rigte"ieo h aa-rsdne10 oetaeu.Rv tion about a year and a half ago, and
tion surrounding the Montana indict- eepolrsle osciieeey ly ~uls one atro h his interesting and witty way of speak-
UNI)E11,6RAI)VATE WOMEN TO BE mont of Senator Wheeler, its "prose- thngl ifstneesr opoettent ogegtoa hrho n roing found a ready recepion with the
t utor," the committee 'was told by 1- inlpetg. and now of Akrn, Ohio, will officiate. student body. Probably the most n-
SOLICITED F OR MEMBERSHIP In an interview with Japanese news-
bet S. lno ahilTu. htpprmn asiamte htte The interment will take place at teresting thing about Stefansons.GesofNsvlTn.,tapprmnMsuadiedhtte
million dollar fund for" a University ofi range a personal conference between -and that. the matter had ben re- ment, DantielF. Zimmermnan, Prof. E. Whose ancestors, nver ,had.MihgnLae zldg Iorr
MihgnLau ulig nodrthe senator and Mr. Daugh erty "to ported to them. nl. Sunderland of the LaW school, Prof. 'an. D)yke Will alk
calWe"Onffo anhr."Cze feature of tesituation whih same orHfteEnls eat enry Van .yke, Unted SttearfJ-
that ,the alumnae mnay know the re- ,call-SWheelMorroff offeDaugherty."rt-bassador to the Neterlands nd Iux-
Chairm an Thom pson 's testim ony irs ost com forting to Japan, ,lte fo - tent, Prof. W ilbur 'R. H um phreys o tl s o h t d n a p i n o 'e n m n s e o m n e iof' m u g f o .93or n n n t o h a i n l c i -{fr t d al i h c n ii n n t e t h n l s e a t e t n r f e e o ei e i ; r ly f l~ ruggb c o i d s r ai g ,9 0 a
paign, it is planned to reach every ! I' The Wolverines opened tecouthern
undegradate omanby My 9. suing years. The commission had re- American newspapers. te Japanese tcueIal i oebriax yei wl
Atdethrawom en'som assbyMeting tor beab y n ov mb r. Va lconim ended to M .' Daugherty that ;people m ay still place hope in the B ' IIne t etk o na n a t o n et .1 0'a1 :A h w m nsa s m ei g to b r a n s f m rc n h r c e ,a t
held Apil 29 forLthe installaticno i criminal prosecutions be instituted, on gr atnssoAmeicn ha" rcter n oni onciu nw sa uhradpe.~eh'
Women'struLeagute officers a g'a plan to r Bontthewsgroundn thatbecombinationsof Eexisted trustii thats LCoolidfice.sathattofsr-!ightedouPrthftscoorintoonseonswasatbornfoinCo1867l beend atdprdfessornetof Englishityliteratur tn
t phough taciturn statesman, and Hugh-. a uhod onciuadsuida rneo nvriy n ~nv
licit a $50 l ifmebrship from everyI both to hold up prices of mnufactur- es will do al that is P ossible to pire- rchitectreat teMsahstsI-apoesrepiu nltrtr
undergradu ate woanianw aid-nurse .on etoactocnuerndo ld'vent ' Japanese-American estrange- stitute' ot Technology. After eavingthtcle.
'0h campus will be outlined. Presi- (downj prices of' the raw material from net"ta colh needteofc fI-1Iscreraamno etr a
dent Marion J'irBli tn will- addrdss the frmr. '-lan IDenonstration4Peabody ad Stearnsarcitects, i b e ie r tonlashe hsn
'sh-eeting -which'mill .he held in SaraI . +E Wlkins.prison :guard;and iLaboir elements, hardest ,ht by the Bstn, winnig' h ~ctaelt~an actie ebeawllerel of the InstituteetatAlat~riil ieici rln, r peaipgem slolrhii 1$d i t ar'1et
Caw l;nelhil co ueinenats tatputl mrcasuinaeurprigdm-slesinded ::wastui, in -;{i Ataidl tthe ofthsevelcoun Ep
It"s expected thiat 'up'~ards of, 1,000 i Apil 16, whhe wa~upene a ostrations against theeclusion.,The This gave him two ytears of study in
will' attend Lthe 'opening diitner of the 4then- heard, and! touched o drg trfapan Federation f abr and ;the! Erpe> art of ths 'im"wa s iiit' i~n adFac.Sne18,~h
Derip t hc euls t heinstitution. ereF Gvennt Wrkmen' soviation i; Itly hee i helhs frst boo cme out, mt l more tnDtotathialreut fl 4v tt oe in~ sAsnt Iaywee n19 e are lffrn'vlue a T7es o
almaei fci n 1897 married. Wilifnsrent volumes of- VantmDyke's 'pos I
the 'student campaign wil be announe- TRemuis, an ho ~olgger'Wlin eplanng. tbas etng nAfter his return t eTa nkhvbe thisliohedr
ed. They xiii also be wired to' other' said,- had- a=,private, room and. bathl ebothi T okio and Osako, at which tewsfr tm ih thepleaw!utrns hv ee"ulihd
holdco u e , w n M ,W l n ' dn erasmlta e u m nawi thethe pr son sidered. Both officialil b co - iti stanswhe eunofficialh o fi iaCoolidgeal and CBlid etBst n a caief shipo ulctsead r 1'a re entyo
'hJapanesenare tryingatookeep thehpos- subsequently with MKim, Meaf and 'Poston by storm, wll give a rectal
Jpnsartrigtkeptepsone in Detroit. The national execu- ( j;l Whte and with Cass Gilbert of New Hie will read the new dranatization o
TYOIT LI D ituin of Cyrus E. Woods, the American ,
nie ouncmtent fscessfult reulsanUfLLi ambassador, as unembarrassed as po-I York City. With Mr. Gilbert his prin- "In Waled Jimmy."This is said t
thnemueiit ocapagnfwl sl utofin sible. To banquets planned to we- cipal work was on the Union club be an extremely humorous selection
eUnte States-one fly' of whose interior he had charge. Tom Skeyhil, popular soldier-poe
wide campaign. _'____the American Association of Japan FFrom 1908 to 1912 he practiced his of Australia, will probably appear bnegautsol ilb lo- Oeatyut r ceubedtk iwdyeeigadth te ~ h rfsina rhtc nNw okfr h hita ees lhuhz~
edl a life membership rate of $50 as place on Wednesday Thursday. Fri- American-Japan Society Wednesday- City, coming to the University of Mich- ! definite (date has as yet been et. IHe
tershare in the $1,000,000 campaign day, and Saturday this week in the evening-have been postponed. Mr. igan at the end of that period, will speak on "Soviet Russia Today.
andi they alone will beC given five Yearsj Mimes theater undemr the direction of Woods requested the postponement. i echn ee a en iheA wrd traveler, economist, and polC
pHstahnheelabenithin which to pay their subsciriptionis-E .Mortimer Shuter, director- of ies, saying that at this jucture it would his trainingMand experience ooisimport-w'il
hisquaiaified todspeakrienthionsubject. '
All alumnae ar'e askedl to, contribute aind the Mimes committee. Casts and be iimpossible for hun to speak pub fed of architectural design, ii which quaifi~ed iea n th s latecord W
anidiiua haeof$07 andl~ are choruses will be chiosen at this time lialv without discussing immigration' ant undertakings, according to his at the brattle of the Daidenelles, an
allowed )t lthreer years in which to for the annual production to be shown Iand that. on the other hand, it would associates, was of great value. 'As a ,i ,,tattmeh hsbenon"
,athaiiutothiplde. Inext fall, but little wrk will be den Tile equally impossible to deal with sieta ieieisbe n.o
hay h uinto herpeg s b h hwutlnx er ' tatsbeti ulcadeq o-practitioner he has been very actie the popular 'idols of the Australia
An uiumehdocaasigand hasconesin f3n Ab p eope, an &hi poety hafund
been selected. It willble carriedl on- The tryouts will be held separately eign Minster Matsui and other Japai-jtn-wJmsB'Aglsho i ?rayrcpinwt hm
by the 144 team icaptains al)poiited by! the 'cast trying out in the morning ?se !loolrs are -said to concur ith' Soth ne J yae~esm an schoo Con ed etin with eisatheĀ°
the student (etalomte er-!frm1 o1 'lc n n h itz-ti iw ences and several fraternity houses. Christmas vacation, "Uncle Henry,
seinting the League houses, the board Inoon-fromn 2 to 4 o'cock,at atime de- z sefiapitetwt i rfso ono a ebro 'h oua imrs,'~l pa f
of directorofthe ~amen 'sLeague, idted by IItebarIfPietosofteATnr
III'.hII first in 1917,rr be- . hutWriiings force in tee Mim'WeeklyP forS sISI
tedrioisadtesrr tre htier inhse oicean ther Mimes1. u brAt soitinfrs n197 e-tvtiiuauCli'rsWeky r tir
Eac tem cptan A11,intrviw t muEst comaerepared to Iead a select- ; iin a flning president of the association in a time, ad is sail to have a largf'1,,Wotn a fthsfr' w m;he I mo
[,iin eie n ig=F I II l NTI p U1920-21. I flowing' of adiingreaders. ' He is'
obtatis a sublscription' -becoming a ionheciteanswingh r IY l beILchosenI r He is survived by rs: 13yno 'so xell-known as a publicist and a
to mmeofferta.by the committee -of-Mimes will try out- and three children, Louise, Lucia andSok thor of oea serious works.e
in the afternoon from 4 to :30, and Sixteen Chinese and Japanese stu-I George, and by three brothers, H. W. Soea onnecient
FAC LT -~UU NIMIEH will be expected to dance. No special; dents, members of the Cosmopolitan Boynton of Bristol, Connecticut, Prof ie he am-y E mers n osdk wh dli-
XE former experience is required. as they; club, accompanied by Prof. J. A. C. lartyJuneoyillnappeariongthe prograj
willallbe under the personal direct- Hildner, and Calton V. Wells of the PercyoH Boynton ofs Chicagolapparuniver-'grit
; sit, an G. . B~yn. on January 23. Mr. Fosdick is pr
p T i~on of an old Opera man who willj rhetoric department, visited five cit- ,H osity.landeG.kH.nByntnfeBton.al
IN FAILAPOSSIBIlIT1Y, teach theme the steps. There will be ies in Michigan during the sprimngwvather as(aofriend, associatewoo
the;hrsetepn cou Lo ion. The purposes of the yearly who had the priviedge of knowing___________
which men ranging in size from 5 spring trip says Mr. Wels, are to ac- sadPrfsorLrh atI IE 3fomIf
Rc~cmmeldaioi tha a aclltystufeet 6 inches to 5 feet 7 inches will beI quainthfoegsudtwihHl llII IIlLhl
dent mixer, akin to that held Apil 10 ntlisentheomnsicorussallefnwhmw-thliAcsto- andcommercial in ethods.'night.IL IIIIU ilU U~

Score by innings:
Michigan1o'4'0
Cincinnati f0 2 p0

0013
3002

Two base hits: Wilson,
Three base hits: Glasgow.
runs, Blott 2. Sacrifice hits:
2, Torrey, Shoesmith. Stolen
Bach-man, Blott. Stiruck outE
Alarkle 3. Torrey 2, Shoes.
Jablonowski 2. Hit by -pitches
MID-SEMLSTER HRP
April 25 has been set ast
on k\,ich mid-semester repot
be received in the office of D(
our llumphi'ey, assistant de-;
literary school.' They will be
to students who are thus rep
decificeut in their work, as
following week as it is possib'
h'eni Eent out. About twelve
warnings were- sent out r
dean's office last semester.

the date
rts must
ean XWiI-
l .f tit
ie mailed
orted as
soon the
)le to ;et
hun~ired
rom the

UNION WILL INTRUOUCE

fil riat the Uinion under tire auspices ofthtes,
UnoadteSuetCrsina-EEKLY I NN ER u~UT sociation be held next-.year will prob-
-ably be made by the , committee' in
Weekly dlinztr dances have bepen chargo of the: recen-t mixer, The
placd o the Uiibn~~ea~nd'r fi~ewx heads of the two organizations un,-I
placd onthe ~iiiir 'alenar fr (Iedl:Nwhich the first ,mixer was Mlid are ,
remainder of the year. Officials of the CXI)Ceted to carry gout plans- for the.
Union 'yEsterday' decided that - the !'next Mixer, whv w lp
functions will, be held every TIhuisday Yheld in. tile fall. u..-
evening, in, response to -a large nu- -
ber of requests by- the Uijuon m inti- -4 - ied -- d e Ti~I M n
bership. i.__
j The first of the series will 'be .bell Thiere aye. several. good ,,open- '
from 6 to 8S o'clock. Thursday night,.ngonheAvringSaff
in ings oil, theiAdvertisingo xStaff of
in~~~~~~~~ temidiigro. oetIa: The Daily at present.- Any stu-
charge will be made-" for the music, d(ent interested, in, outlining. ad-
Iwhich wiii be furnished by the Union vertising campaigns, conducting #
orchestra. The usual dinner price of l mresearches, or in writing adver-
$1 per plate will prevail. Reservations tisements may apply for these!

will be about 6 feet tall, and the girls ; TI-e travellers were entertainer[ ini
chorus for which men who are about private Ihomes in four of the five cities
5 feet 9 inches tall are wanted. , visited.'GE CLUB"
______________ I Leaving Ann Arbor Monday, noon,,
thedelgatonwent to Battle -Creeks,
Jatp s To Translate 'thewent to Kalamazoo, TRP O
" s 115 ex B o Graned Rapids, Lansing, and Flint, ; TI K
spending a day in each city. Indus-.
trial plants, educational institutions, Tlirty-four m
Permission has been grasnted by Hat"- and entertaining organizations claim- 'gan Cle!', club.Y
court, .Brace- and Co. publishers to ed tihe larg~e part of the time of the 4bor tl~ls mnornii
TProfessor' Wateba of Uyeda, Shi'nshu, students. spring tmrip, whit
Japan, to' translate-s the-, "'History- of Robert WV.Chw '2 6, speaking on t~'o last nigh'
American -Literature" 'written by Pro-- ithe subject, "The Challenge to the ers md h
L essor Thomas ,.Ranking of the rhe- Chinese' Student" mIadte a favorable V iilllian.
~toric department and William M. impression in Qevery city' where he cluiaciour too
Aiken, for use in Japanese schools and spoke, according to newspaper clipp- U1' hnot
4pbihdbthtcmayThbokings from the cities visited. it h ot
pubwi b trasatdominto The Jbpnese The student delegation entertained 'state. Special
thisillrbefessorlatednernandtMr. Wells atIaprovided for the
1language, the wr being done inthsPoeorHln adM.W lst special dinner at the Union 'Sunday a t osof the

ENDS YEARLY

HAYIKb IUU M Vr

NICE SPRING WEATHER
Welcome back all ye students and
denizens. Hope ye all had the
grand and glorious vacation. Now
for some pleasant work and the
summer will soon be here. But
on the other hand if there is ary

ollowng tharecetsannunce
RETURN IO ~Y ollo0 wi nte rulest aoteb
of. the to negwrues ardngedobr
-- - - -, graduation; a printed announcesr
members, of th-. Mi chi- has been sent -out; from the otic(
wil rtur. o'-n R-1egistrar Arthur G. Hall to 154 jun
ng after -their -arnn i al all of whom. have fewer points t
Pich started A pr.i 11 and h uis. Th l ttr- 'l s tt nt-
d in Detroit., -' ous 'hh -ete sinsga-tnt~
entire trip by sYecfal! the adoption of the rules whereby e
- I hour. .of E,4 grade received yields
ok the members ' f the ci edit, and, a negative point calls
he Straits of Ma .J nac tention tothe fact that since for g.
iermost citif35 of the uation, the -entire record must sho
entertainment; were I C average, it will be come "increas
he members of 'the cluo ly difficult to make up a disparit,
acities visited by local I points."
wignrrai~ain The' lette'r s.tates further that tV

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