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April 09, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-04-09

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T HE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN OR SNOW
TODA

.-Y. r

it i AI. anAk

aitjj

MEMIBER
ASSOCIATED IPRE
and
WESTERN CON FER]
EDITORIAL ASSOCIA

VOL. XXXIV. No. 143

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1924

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE Cl

________________________- a

___-_-

4

F

INDICTED
G1UR Y
CHA6E

Garg Recalls Campus Life
As It Was in Fathers' Day

SENATOR SAID TO HAVE TAKEN
OIL RETAINING FEE
UNLAWFULLY
CAMPBELL, STEVENSON
ALSO NAMED IN B I L L
Will Telegraph Warrant for Prosecu-
tor of Senate Daugherty Investi-
gating Committeey
Great Falls, Montana, April 8.-(By
A. P.)--U. S. Senator B. K. Wheeler,
prosecutor of the senate Daugherty
investigating committee, was indict-
ed here today by a federal grand jury
on a charge of unlawfully receiving
money as a retainer fee to influence
the issuance of oil and gas prospect-
ing permits by the secretary of the

Freakish as present day styles .may
p seem, Gargoyle in its April "Old;
Timer's Number" has cast waidelight
upon the idiosyncrasies of the old'
boys on the campus that is distinctly
I encouraging. Life on the campus isn't
what it used to be, says Gargoyle, and
with its representations of high wheel-
ed likes and flounce shirts proves its
point.
Here we have an accurate history
of campus traditioh, starting with the
"First Campus Pet," which is a com-
placent dinosaur grazing placidly nearj
University hall. Then other insti-I
tutions are brought into play, with
Jack Clarke, '25, showing on a wood
cut the Hobbs-Slosson debate to a silk-
batted audience, Professor Wenley and
President Burton in varied discourse,
and Chief of Police O'Brien curbing
speeders with his high wheeled bicy-
doe.r

Nandolin, swing hammock, a girl
with an old time coiffure, and the 1898
beau brummel typify the issue on the
cover design by Walker Everett, '26.1
This attractive cover is followed by aj
frontpiece, which contrasts styles of
the different period in pleasing fash-
ion.
"Clippings from an old 'Ensian" and
a full page drawing by Marion Van
Every, '24, fall into the old time at-
mosphere and are praiseworthy work.
Garg has fallen down a trifile in its
written material for this issue, but thej
art work balances it easily.
Gargoyle's smaller jokes are not
generally as clever as in previous is-
sues this year, but in the main they1
are catching. This issue, which
eclipses most of its month's contem-
poraries for size and quality, is in the
whole a worthy effort.
G. W. D.

Interior and commissioner of the gen-
eral land ofce.
With Senator Wheeler were indict-
ed Gordon Campbell, oil geologist and
operator, and L. C. Stevenson, oil
promoter and principalowner of an
oil refinery. Campbell and Stevenson
were the discoverers of the Sun-
burst-Kevin oil fields in Montana.-
Other oil men of lesser prominence
also were indicted on charges of us-
ing the mails to defraud.
The grand Jury charges that on
three occasions Senator Wheeler ac-
cepted money improperly after he had
been elected U. S. senator but before
te had qualified for the office.k
The Montna junior senator is ac-
cused -n the indictment of having
taken money from Gordon Camr',ell
and others to secure for them oAl and
gas prospecting leases giving them
the exclusive right to . evelop oil on
gover'ntent land for a period of two
years . ,,
3.Daley, Who was among those
charged with unlawful use .of the
mails, was caught in the recent oil
cases in Texas which led to the con-
viction of r. Cook. Daley himself
was convicde4and at present is serv-
e ng a prison term.of a year.
John .L. i4 ttery U. S. district: at-
torney who presented the cases to the
grand jury, said that awarrant for
Senator Wheeler's arrest would ibe
telegraphed:to Washington. The tech-
nical charge is violation of section 113
of the U. S. penal code.
Washingtoh, April 8 - By AP)-
senator Wheeler in a statement to-
night declared that the indictment -re-
turned against him in Great Falls,
Mont., was brought "solely for the'
purpose" of Interfering with senate
investigation of the departmeit of
justice.
It was convincing evidence, he' as-
serted, that investigation of the de-
partment should go on, and ie declar-
ed that it would go on because the
action in Montana ".shds' that'even
with Daugherty out of office his mal-
ign influence still moves his old
paw."
The indictmet, the statement add-
ed, was "evidently brought out at the
instigation of the republican national
commttee fficit in connivance wit
late attorney-genral" and wite hop-
es that it will be tried before a judge
who was a recent selection of Daugh-
erty.
Former Attorney-Gener'al Daugherty
at the same time authorized the
statement that the evidence presented
to the grand jury at Great Falls, was
uncovered by the postoffice depart-
ment and that the department of jus-
tice "had nothing whatever to do with
it.
PARNALL ACEPTS POST
IT ROCHSTERHOPiTA.L
Dr. Chrristopher G. Parnall, resigned
director of the University hospital has
accepted the post of Medical. director
of the Rochester General, hdspital of
New Yerk, according to announce-
ment made yesterday afternoon. He
will assume his new duties July 1, fol-
lowing the completion -of his work
here.
Dr. Parnall has also accepted an ap-
pointment as consultant for the $5,-
000,000 construction project of the
University of Iowa Two new build-
ings, a medical school and a huge hos-

STATE VOUTE SHOVS
PRES I INIT VIC TOR
Coolidge Overwhelms hiram lohnson
By Count of 172,066 toI
76,144

FORD LEAD CLOSE RACE
INJD MOCRATIC PRIMARY
Detroit, Michigan, April 8.-(By A.
P.)-The overwhelming victory of Cal-
vin !Coolidge on the republican ticket,
the apparent defeat of Senator Wood-
bridge W. Ferris by Henry Ford on the
Democratic ballot and a see-saw con-
test between two women candidates
for a place on the Democratic national
committee-these were today the out-
standing features of Monday statewide
presidential primary
Each additional tabulation of re-
turns served to incre se the lead of
President Coolidge ov' Senator Hi-
ram Johnson of California, 2,105 of
the state 2,890 precincts giving Cool--
idge 172,066 and Johnson 76,114. Cool-
idge supporters tonight were claiming
a plurality of more than 100,000 votes
f wheb complete returns are received.
For d's advantage over Fcrris was
Pxarrow,s2M60. precincts giving the De-
tioit manufacturer a load.- of only
2,33 which is somewhat under the'mar-'
gin maintained1 earlier in the day.
James E. Davidson, :Bay City ship
builder andbanker, was re-elected as
Republican national .commintteemati.
Williah A. Comstock was 'lectd to
one of the vacancies on the Democia-
tic national committee,' bt the con-
test between Etta C. Boltwood and
Evelyn S. Mershon for other places
was undecided, Mrs. Boltwood having
a lead of 42 votes on returns from
2,060 precincts.
COCHYOT TOADDESS
NEW YORKLUMNI,11 -D
Coach 'ielding H. Yost 'will speak
before the Unive'sity alumni of New
York at their annual reunion banquet
today. This banquet, which takes
place at the Commoore hotelthis.
6year, is one of the lhgest" ~atheing
!of its kind i the country, attractinig
many promient speaters. n '
Yesteiraythe oach attended :the
annual gathering of Boston alumni in
company with President Burton.
WILL START PROGRAIMS
AT1TP RUOM ONIGHT
A program of entertainment will be
held beginning at 8 o'clock this even-
ing in the tap room of the Union.
The program is to be furnished by
various campus organizations for the
purpose of enlivening the tap room
as a gathering and meeting place.
Special feature acts will be provid-
ed from time to time by a Union com-
mittee, of which Roy Spanagel, '25
is chairnan, to lead in the entertain-
ment of the evning 'The freshmai'
glee club has promised to contribute
songs occasionally and to aid in what-
ever way it can.
ISTRIBUTE MILITARY'
BALL PROGRAMSTODAYl
Programs and booth assignments
for the fourth annual Military Ball,

.---
FOR EBTSSTUDBY
French Newspaper Piblishers Report;
Believes Reparations Boaxd
Successful
DAWES, McKENNA, WILL MAKE
OFFICIAL DELIVERY TODAYf
Paris, 'April 8.-Brig. Gen. Charles
G. Dawes and his fellow reparations
experts seemed to have attained the
objects at which they aimed declares
Le Matin in presenting a summary
of the committee's forthcoming report
which is accepted here as auth-orit-
ative.
They achieved this, the newspaper
adds, without passing beyond the lim-
its set for them-that is, without rais-
ing the political question of the :oc-
cupation of the Ruhr or trying to fix
definitely the amount of the German
debt, since, if the Dawes report gives'
exact details on the amount of the
yearly payments which may be exact-
ed from the reich, it'in no way fixes!
the number (f theke -annuities, ate
least as regards the part which de-
pends on the budget surplus of the'
r~i~h. WHi' Deliv er Today"Y '~
The time bfthe ufficIal hlvery to
the reparations ominim.ssiop of the re
ports of both theexz rt conmittees-
those li'aaded''respectively by Brig.
Gen. Dawes and Reginald McKenna,,
was definitely fixed today for 10 0- 1
clock Wednesday morning.
The reports will be immediately
turned over to the . reparation com-
mission for that body to make public.
The Dawes' report provides mainly,
according to Le Matin, that Germany,
shall receive no moratorium, a tem-
porary concession will be made of'
her railroads, a mortgage placed on
her industries and a bureau establish-
ed to govern the, transfer of money
from the country in such a manner as
to disturb the exchange market as;
little as possible.
Her annual payments would be tap-
ered to keep pace with her economic
recovery and financial ability
If financial disorder prevents or
delays :exectution of Germany's fi-

rCO0MMiTTEE ,HOLD0S
INESTIGATION OF
STORCK REVEALS WAR CONTRACT
GRAFTS IN POWDER BY
SUPONT
BODY HEARS FACTS OF
BOSTON MAIL FRAUDS
Armstrong Adds Detail to Ca rgesk
That Officials Protected
Breweries
1 E
l Washington, April 8.-(By A. P.)-
Conditions surrounding the enforce-
ment of prohibition in the Illinois de-
partment of justice action in relation
to war contracts of the Old Hickory,
Powder company of Tenn'essee, and a
mail fraud case in Boston were dis-
cussed by witnesses who appeared to-
day before the senate Daugherty in-
vestigating committee.
As a result of testimony concerning
"protection" declared to have been ac-
quired by Chicago breweries and boot-
leggers, which Brice F. Armstrong, a
prohibition agent at Chicago contin-
ued from his first appearance yester-
day, E. iC. Yellowley, chief of federal
general prohibition enforcement
agents, was called before the commit-
tee and submitted official records ask-
ed for by committee members.
Details of the Old Hickory case and
mention of the mail frauds were giv-
en the committee by Geo. W. Storck
now an accountant for the department
of justice, who told of recommend-1
ations that the return of $5,000,000,
being sought from the Dupont inter-
ests, as owners of the Old Hickory
plant, on war contracts for powder,{
and that an investigation of the
"green case" at Boston had disclos-
ed expensive mail frauds,hbut had re-
sulted in no federal prosecutions.,
Armstrong added many details to
the charges that he made yesterday
that breweries were permitted to op-;
erate in Chicago largely through theE
assistance of "local politicians." He<
gave the names of plants and assert-c
ed that the department of justice and
prohibition units had failed to bring 1
injunction procoding that would close(
them down. I
REED TUE IPEINTE
ON FO' ~APEMDCITI

1,380 ENDORSE PRESIDENT.
RE-ELECTION ON CAMPAIGN
HUGHES SECOND

IN

STUDENT BODY VOTES
STRONGLY REPUBLICANI
McAdoo First of Democrats 'With 152;
Smith Comes in Next; LaFollette
Tops Johnson
Calvin Coolidge, president of the
United States, ,and candidate for re-
election on the republican ticket, was
pronounced the winner of the all-
campus Presidential straw ballot by
almost a two to one count. The bal-
doting was conducted yesterday by the,
local Republican club and was for
the purpose of determining the politi-.
cal tendencies of the students here.
The count which gives Coolidge the
victory was 1,380 votes in his favor,
while those of his nearest compedi-
tor, Charles Evans Hughes, secre-
tary of State to Mr. Coolidge, num-
bered only 497. The balloting proved
that Michigan is strongly republican.
The balloting was as follows: Re-
publican, Coolidge first with 1,380,E
Hughes second with 497,. LaFollette
third with .223, and Johnson fourth
'with 135; Democratic, McAdoo led
with 152, Smith second with 90, Davis
third with 61, and Underwood last
with 40. The. tot4aal count of both1
parties reached more than 2,600 votes,
cast in the 'hours between 8 and 4
o'clock yesterday.
Others who although not originally
on the ballot received votes were
Ford, Borah, Cox, Walsh, Ralston,j
Hoover, Bryan, and Copeland each:
receiving one vote. Dr. Tom Lovell,
local nominee, received one vote, Eu-
gene V. Debs,. well known convict re-'
ceived one vote. These were not
counted in the grand total.
Next fall the Republican club is.
planning to handle the absentee bal-
lots free. of all charges, including
postage, notary fee, etc., including
both parties.
RESEARH1ONENIO

COOLIDGE FIRST
IN STRAW BALLOT I
BY 2TO1 COUNT'

Prof. Thomas H. Reed, o' the poli- -
tical science department; will enter I.Prof. Harrison M. Randall, head of
the 'University hospital some time the the department of physics, will at-
latter part of this week to undergo an tend the national meeting of the
operation 'for appendicitis, according American Physical society to be held.
to announcement made yesterday April 25 and 26 at the Bureau of Stan-
morning. He has been ill for some dards in Washington. Professor Ran-]
time but has continued to meet his Idall is a member of the - executive
classes and lectures. - council of the society, sand is the Phy-
According to Professor heed's sical society's representative to the
statement he wil'l be unable to meet National Research council which will
his classes for some time after the meet at the same time.
spring recess. Everett S. Brown will Prof W. F. Colby and W. N. St. Peter
take over his lectures. also of the physics department will
j attend the national convention. Profes-
n sor Colby will read a paper that will
,Lbe used as a chapter for a book that
the-'research council will publish on
the radiation of gases. Professor Col-
by's paper is on the "The Near and
Far Infra Red Band Spectra." Pro-

Name Bursley,
Aigler,Lloyd
OnCommittee
Appointment of Dean Alfred H.
Lloyd, of the graduate school, Dean
Joseph A. Bursley, and Prof Ralph
W. Aigler, of the Law school, as flac-
ulty members of the student-faculty
discipline investigating board has been
announced by President Marion L.
Burton. The students on the board
are John W. Kelly, '24L, president of
the Student council, Stewart R. Boy-
er '24L, and Donald W. Stehetee, '24.
This investigating committee was
created last week by the Senate coun-
cil to consider more adequate means
of dealing with student discipline
cases by giving the students more
power in judicial affairs and a larger
measure of self-government in the
University. The first meeting of the
board will probably be held Thursday
of this week.
S PATZ TAL-KSO.
FLYIING SERVICEl

HUGHES WIL I PA

Army Squadron Has Many Induce.
ments To Offer Amateur Aviator,
He DeclaresI
EXPERT DOES NOT SEE REAL
ADVANTAGES IN WORLD TOURS
Major Carl Spatz, commandant of
1Selfridge Field, Mt. Clemens, in his
address last night in the Natural
Science auditorium, advised all men
who had any intentions of entering,
the flying game to. enter through' the
army service. He stated that commer-
eial' air service has not as yet reach-I
ed the point' where it 'offers induce-
ments. tothe amateur afiator, while'
on the other hand the army keeps
abreast of -they times, maintaining a
full and complete equipment and of-
fering unlimited scope for research'
and experimentation.
"Growth of aviation depends upon
two things," stated Major Spatz.
"In the first place, a machine must
be designed which will carry from
four to six times the freight as the
present machine. Secondly, laws must
be enacted protecting enterprisers 'in
the flying game." -
Official army - movies, 'depictingj
some of the phases of airplane dev-
elopment and 'usage were shown.'
Great battleships were sunk with
single 'bombs; a perfect .smoke cur-
tain was hung which would hide-anI
entire fleet for twenty, minutes on a,
still day; bombers with a capacity ofj
28,000 pounds and little pursuit planes
with a speed ranging up to 250 miles
an hour, were shown in various pos-
itions.
In an interview following his lec-
ture. Major Spatz stated that the use
of the dirigible as a war machine
would be confined to night flying and
transport duty, its weight and clum-
siness rendering it useless for ex-
tensive w'ork on' battle lines.
Asked for his opinion on the effect
of the present world tour, he respond-
ed that he failed-to foresee any prime
effects. 'He also stated that he
thought the proposed trip of the
Shenandoah to the North Pole would
have been a good thing.
LEAVES FOR EN6LAND"I
Dr. Alexander G. Ruthven, director
of the zoology museum, has left for
London, England, where he will spendt
several months observing British mus-
eums and will attempt to formulate a
system of exchange between the mus-
eums of the two countries.
Methods employed by museums
throughout the British islands will be
studied by Dr. Ruthven, although the
majority of his work will be carried
on in London at the museum there.
While on his tour of investigation, he'
will consult with officials of the mus-
eums to develop a satisfactory me-:
thod of exchanging speciments and in--.
formation.}
Miss Ada Winslow curator in thek

SPEAKER IS REGARDED AS 0
OF WORLD'S GREATEST
STATESMEN
LABOR LEADER IS GOIN
TO IMPORTANT MEETI?
Former Australian Premier V
Vice-President of Reparations
Committee
Australia's premier from 1915
1923, The Right Honorable Willi
Morris Hughes, will speak at a r
ular University lecture at 8 o'cl
tonight in Hill auditorium. The s
ject for his lecture will be "'4
Pacific, the Coming World Proble:
Mr. Hughes will arrive this aft
noon, and will stay at the Union. D
ing his stay here he will be under
personal guidance of Prof. W.
Hobbs of the geology department, w
will also introduce him, in the
sence of President Burton.
Helped Make Peace
It was largely due 'to Mr. Hugh
influence that Australia played sn
an active part in the World War, i
as vice-president of the Reparat:
Commission at Paris, Mr. Hug
played a large and influential p
in the arrangement of the terms
peace which oficially closed the w
Mr. Hughes is now on his way
I-ondon, accompanied by his wi
In London he. will attend the fi
meeting of the British Imperial Coi
cil of the Empire. They will ret
by way of the United States so
time this summer.
Universally considered as one
the leading authorities on the n
East, in addition to his fame as
satesman and labor leader, Mr. Hu
es is perhaps one of the best qualif:
men of the present day on the pr
lems of the Pacific. This liesti
becomes more and more potent w
the increasing development of the Q
ent,, in addition to the rapid progp
being iiatl"d&'y Asstr' i i allM '
Zealand -4 - '
A thdrities h'e&lr┬░eady 'adniil
Sth in future genirafloifsitI e ct
tidn of the -fPaffi" will pobibly
of greater' commercial andi politi
itmportance' thmnAthat ofithe Atlafin
Mr Hughes is expected to' explain,
his lecture, how deeplythe Englih
speaking countries are .likely to:
concerned in these developments.'
Fears Asiates
In an interview in New York
week Mr. Hughes linked Aeriea a
Australia as being in consideral
danger of an influx of Asiatics w
could not be assimilated by West
civilization. He said, "The awaker
East comes on the one hand bringi
gifts and in the other something
a menace."
Mr. Hughes' career beds a striki
resemblance to that of Abraham L
con-both having remarkable p
sonalities, and rising from obacur
to' eminence: He'has been desdril
as, "A strong' man n every sense
the .term, and a supreme intellect
force, Mr. Hughes has . become 1
foremos - leader 'o' the Austra
people."'Y
Arriving in Australia in 1884, at'
'age- of,- twenty, wthout, frien s
money, and in delicate healt,
went inito the backwoods as a man
all-work. 'From this beginning he I
worked his way up, .taking up b
and. finally taking up 'politics an
vocation.
lie Settled Strikes
He first came into prominence
1891, when 'a great shipping str
threatened to tie up all Austral
commerce. In this instance, and
many others, he displayed a rema
'able capacity for handling men.
I served in the New South Wales P
I liament for ten years, after which
was elected to the Federal: Parliam
of Australia. In 1908, shortly al
his appointment as attorney gene
Mr. Hughes came into internatio
prominence through his effici
settlement of several great industi
strikes.

l At the present.time Mr. Hughes
only holds a high position in Austi
ian political life, but is said to h
no equal in that country as a pol
cal economist, and publicist. It is s
that he is a fascinating speaker, f
quiently witty, and invariably eloqu(
Like other notable world figu
such as Lloyd .George in Great Briti
Clemenceau' in France, Smuts in
rica and Borden in Canada, he cc
hines great intellectual force w
high purpose and stubborn tenac
qualities which have made him
stoaffmnn nf the firt.ode

.S
r i
!.1

provide automatic installation of strict Hawley Tapping, '11, field secre-
control by the allies." ' Itary of the alumni association, will at-
"Rie-Establishes Unity" tend the alumnus publications con-
In connection 'with the Ruhr, 'the ference at the University of Virginia
experts consider economic i'e-estab- jfat Charlottsville, this week and will
lishmient of Germany can be durable!I address one of the sessions on "The
only on one condition-the economic ( Relation of the Alumni to the Uni-
unity of the country must be entirelyversify." John Bradfield, '18, busi-
re-established. Hessmaa.ger of the Alumnus, and
Without raising the question of il-Wilfred B. Shaw, general secretary
itary occupation of the RuhT, the ex- i
perts indicate that it will be necessary of.the association, will accompany
for Germany to resume free disposalhm.
of customs and state industries like
forests, coal mining and railroads in
the territory occupied by FrenchU
troops. The railroad system of the I
Ruhr and Rhineland would be under fl
special supervision of an allied repre- U U U U U NI
sentative. .
Under the proposed reduced annual E T OORO IGHT
payments Germany would apply on The Union will hold a dinner dance
the reparation account the first year from6 toSo'clock tomorrow evening
1,000,000,000 gold marks, raised by in the main dining room of the Union.
means of an international loan of The regular Union orchestra is to
800,000,000 gold marks, plus 200,000, furnish the music for the occasion.
000 form the transportation tax. The rice for dinner is to be $1, the
The second and third years shes usual cost.
would pay 1,200,000.000 gold marks, ..
the fourth year 1,750,000,000 and the Freshman Class
fitth 2, 460,000,000, and so on. From F
te 'sixth year the reparation com- Mast Foot Bill
mission would exact supplementary
payments in addition to the forego- FOr Flag stunt
ing of 2,460,000,000 gold marks, de-
pendent on a prosperity index careful-' Costs of more than $50 for the re-
Iv estahlishedlbhv the TDawe snmmit- I -, . - . ,- .- ..

fessor St. Peter will read a paper on
"The Infra Red Line Spectra of Zinc
and Oadmnium."
A paper will also be read at the
convention that has been prepared by
Prof. R..A. Sawyer -and E. J. Martin
of the physics department on "The
Vacuum Spark Spectrum of Zinc."
The American Physical society holds
four meetings 'east of the Mississippi
every year. The next meeting of the
society will be held here November 28
and 29.-

i
.'

Discuss WIDENINOF
STREETS NEAR CAMPUS

r

Possibilities of widening streets museum, has left for SouthAfrica,
about the University campus were dis- w museu h arSoth Africa,
cussed 'yesterday noon' in the open where she will carry on work in In-
forum by the Chamber of Commerce vestigating molluscs. Miss Winslow:
following the regular weekly lunch- will probably spend a year on this
eon. The general-subject for the dis- project, which is - extensive in -its
cussion was "Street improvements and scope. Other expeditions for the sum-
maintenance." mer months are under preparation.'
The widening of the streets was sug-
gested as a remedy for the congested
traffic conditions near the campus.
The present method of road building . LSE
was heavily scored in the forum.
Faulty construction and poor mater-
ials were blamed for the poor condi- I E
+ion o tf ltivrol'r vana't ..nwia Ahn~1- I

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