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April 05, 1924 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y r I~I 4 y-W~tSTR A PARIL 1i i itiLEr :,l

,... _

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ELECTEDI
LUASTERS~t

To relay Monday I

Printing Press History
Shown In Library Display]

i

church in the morning, the bishop will Ie
be the speaker at the student supper Re
in Harris hail at 6 o'clock in the eve-
ning.

id The Daily "Classified" Columns

*JefferG, Ilary N. Eaton, L. P'.
Jocelyn --amed Executives
F~or Coning Year
,NLR, OF WISCO-NSIA, TALKS
N CONI )irtIoNS OF ErRoPE

F3red A. Jeffers, of Painesdale, was Y
elected president of the Schoolmast-
ers' club for the coming year at Ya
meeting held yesterday morning. Mary
N. Elaton, of Grand Rapids, was select-
ed vice-president and Louis P. Joce- I
lyn, of Ann Arbor, was elected secre-
tary-treasurer. J. H1. Corns, of Detroit,
was appointed the new member of the.{
executive committee and Prof. A. R.50
Crittenden, of the Latin department, ?' .;,
with C. S. Larzelere,of the Central
State Normal, were re-elected to thef
executive groun,_.:"::
Professor Kerner; of the University'
of Missouri, addressed a general ses-
sion yesterday 'on the subject, "TIm-
portance of Eastern European Condi-; Ruith Drniper,
tions." He urged the study of history The talented actress who will pre-I
of European countries and stressed sent a series of character sketches
the necessity for more interest in at the Whitney theater _Monday night,.
them. He told the effects of the revo-, under the auspices of the American,
lution of 1905 and said that they in- Association of 'University Women.
directly influenced the German for-j
eign policy in the Balkans, and the in mindy. Talks or, mathematfcai sub-
Persian revolution in 1906.; jects were also given by ProfE. .-.W.
lHe discussed the Russian revoln- Bracshaw, of the inathema~ics deprt-
tion and asserted that "the back- nient and Professor Karpinski, of the
wardness of any people is °a result mathematics department.
of historical forces and habitat." He--
also said that "the Russian peasant i5s
emerging as the conqueror of the ANNvARuORoWILL UMI
.'evluio.Discusses Roine ia ir nh lll n n rn b
In the address of Prof. Gran~t Show- BA N R PHIlikPROJCT
ermnan, of the University of Illinois,
on "~Greece and Rome," similarities of
Greek and Roman life and culture Little street paving will be done -this
were discussed. year in Ann Arbor, according to City
He said that Rome at one point In Clerk I. G. Reynolds. The present
its history was strikingly I4ellenistic( program provides for the paving of
in its architecture, art, and culture.' only one street, South Main street to
Proximity to Greek centers- of popu- the city limits. It is thought that
lation, slaves brought to the Roman the street will be surfaced with either,
conquerors, and spoils of war accum- asphalt or concrete.
lated by the Romans in their travels Any addition to the paving program
were the basic factors in causing this will not be made until after the city
similarity, the professor stated. election on April 7, :said Mr. Reynolds.
(geography Conference NIeets The paving bond issue has reached the
Delegattes to the geography con- limit, and unless extension' is made
fereuce held their seconid meeting yes-' on the issue, further pavement will
terday in which topics concerning the be impossible, he added.
posibility of placing the study of geo-
graphy on a worth while basis fori r uie To'r'ear Down Union,
high school students, were discussed. Purdu ie, Ind., April 4.-H'ec'ause of
"If we need'the .dailyi doziin' physic- insuffiienit funds, th'e uncompleted
aywe need it mentally," was the. Unioniding iat~ Purdue university is
opinion of Prof. Wi. H. Pearce, of th-'to be :torn ; own. The $200,000 loan~
Central Michigau Normal at tbe math- proit' sed Jby La~ayette banks wasre
nMtics conference inl his tatlk oil "A voked because of the unsettled fin-
Quarter Century of Mathemnatics ancial Condition of the country.
Teaching." He stressed the facit t17at . -
in practical teaching, the fundamental "Jiminie the adta~ler sells -anything
principles to be tauight ix-ust cbett gld~y.-Adv.

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IExamples of the work of famous
printing presses of both ancient and
modern times can be seen in the books
which are now on display at the main
library. Many of the volumes shown
dieate back as far as the fifteenth cen-
tury, when the printing profession
way; in its infancy, and include some
i of t be earliest models of Italian and+
IDut!hwork.
The Italian books in the exhibit
com -e chiefly from Venice, which was
famous at one time for having mrorn
printers than any other city, and'
from, Florence, the seat of the famous°
Junta press. These volumes are all
opened to show the quaint printers
marks which distinguished. the work 1
of each press.* The Dutch volumes
are takenl from works of the Elzevir
press of Leyden and Amsterdam and
tePlantin press of Antwerp. which
counted among its best know pro-
ductions a seven-language Polygot
ilible, printed for Philip the second of
Spain.
A large part of the exhibit is de-
voted to the works of English presses I'
and the more modern of these areIj
illustrated by the books prodlucedl
by the Lee' Priory press, by the Straw-l
berry Hill press, founded -by Horace
s Walpole, and by the Daniel Press at
Oxford, which printed some. of the1
works of Robert Bridges. There are
also a number of books shown from
the Kelmscott :press, founded by W1il-
Paris, April 4.--The chamber of De-I
puties tonight voted confidence in the
,government of premier Poincare, 408
to 151.
Spa ,rose, Cal., April 4.-A slight
efarthquake shock felt here just beforeI
4 o'clock caused audiences =to leave
theatres.

liam Morris. Morris specialized in
heavy faced type and returned to
an old style of decoration and illus
tration. U
The work of modern American
presses complete the exhibit, ,and in,
these can be seen many of the trad-
itions of workmanship started b~y old-
er printers. The Elston press at New
Rochelle, New Yor~k, uses the black-
faced type of William Morris, and the
Mosher press at Portland, Maine fol-
lows the , tyje introduced by Horace 1,
Walpole.
BISHOPTOAMNSE
EPISCOPALRITES HERE1
Right Rev. Herman Page, D.D. the
newly elected bishop of the Episcopal
diocese of Michigan, will he the
preacher at St. Andrew's church on
Sunday morning. He comes to admin-
ister the Rite df Confirmation to a
large class of candidates made tin of
both students and townspeople. This
is Bishop Page's first appearance in
St. Andrew's church and many are
looking forward eagerly to hearing
him. Besides speaking in St. Andrew's

MARCH BNKCLEARINGS}
SHOW MARKED INCREASE!
Bank clearings took a big jump I
during the month' of March in Ann Ar-
bor. Officials state that $3,771,505.56I
c a g d h n si th t t m . T e f-ures for M arch exceed those of M arch
1923 by more than a hundred thousand I
dollars.
The volume of clearings is steadily
lniunting each month, and thus far the
year has been unprecedented in the
I'-istory of local banking, it is said.
Princeton, N. 3., April C.-Alexand-
Ser hall, one of the most historic build-
ings on the campus of Princeton uni-
versity, will be moved to make space
for the new chapel.
New York, April 4.-Chas. Allen
Muns, editor and publisher of the
Scientific American died at his home
today after a brief illness.
Old railroad spikes made worthless
by being bent are reclaimed by an au-
tomatic straightening machine :built
by a western railroad.

Mr. Jerry Coan

Monday, Apil7th.

In presenting our Spring and Sumnmer fabrics
we have departed from the conventional

and stereotyped.

Ye the galaxy of new

will be at the Allenel Hotel -1on

shades and colorings will not make the most
conservative dresser hesitate to. choose some-
thing "different."

I ! .

I_____________

...

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2:W-3,:30

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7 s il":: (1

-11, 1

NEW

What Would You GieeFor a

---o i rail

SPRIG OXFORDS
Of Character and Quality

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AT TUEt THEATERS

Screen-'Today

Arcade - Reginald
"Sporting Youth."
Majestic -- " T h e
Guest."

Denny in
Un invitedl

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The
G.cl
:y
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ro.,w e t
Yi T

Story iby
BYRON
Y ORGAN

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$1 0

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Wuerth--Tomn Mix
.Minute Romreo."

in "Mile-a-

This Oxford
-.-has broad

is of the popular Collegian
toes;i ledium heavy sgl,,

Type
broad

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F7 ' S.

Black or Tan Calfskin..

nrvplnm---- Charles ,Tonesin
_ "Cupid's Firemen" and Ruth
1Rola'nd~ in "Haunted Valley.?'

I. K $taz-Th1,' Week~
Carfrick (Detroit)- LwField s
H in "The Jazz T ing."

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tJhe New.
"Plaza"

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You ' think that you have seen them all,
-but W it 'til you see these young jazz-'
'n aniiks. Wild parties, pretty girls and
hill-p owered racing cars-that's the way
ilt gos
v~ 'r~i Pireity Laura Dw Plante In tOw
I All Hlar Cat

')E4I)DEI)
Ven~4turing '

S10

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;'7arket

-A
p1
I =e pepaecednidvda aytfr Bmailingn
ecLae Your Ordnae Nouwsh
- -z
-I
114 E. HURON ST.-

'A sm'art
new last.
wveighit.

drcss Oxford 'm~ade orver a snappy
Has broad toes, broad heels. Light
Patent leather or dull calfskin.

Ont Display a
Marquardt's Tailor Shop
608 E. Liberty, Ann Arbor
Woodward and Adams
DETROIT

PRSZ7IN0 CTHE HAT6 OF 4 AF.R AT

COLLEGE CLOTHIER
309 South. Mainms treet.

Page

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68M
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A nnex

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SROCERY SPECIALS
Fancy Roquefort Cheese, lb..... .

LAST TIMES TONIGHT

.83c

$5

fit e 'Q'om t

VUninvited

No. 10 Can Apples ............ ,..... .S c
I1No. 10 Can Tomato Pure........ .40c

Guest"

Iw~o

Just As martOn Te
TalAOnThe Head
AMA LLORY Hat attracts: as
47,much admiring attention
off your head as on it and iniside'
as out, because of its twinking,
gloss felt, sumptuous finish,
elegance of. style and luxur~y Qf
detail. Made in America, it is
the best-made hat in the world.
fA~sw~vasOf86e C se, solse s in

Apricots, 2 lbs... . . . . . . .. .. .

..25c

MAURICE .FLYNN
MARY MACLAREN

WITH

JEAN TOLLEY
WILLIAM BAILEY

In a hurry, want quick
service. Step up to our
counter, order, your
coke, mialted or what-
ever you want,= get it
instantly. In times of

:FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
} ALWAYS
I ~QUALITY MEATS

-ON THE STAGE-

"TKOVATO"

ii

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