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March 28, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-03-28

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND SOIWEWH AT
COLDER

I9202 -

I

itF4b

AJW
:43 t I

WESTER
EDITOUVl

VOL. XXIV. No. 133

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN: FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1924

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE,

x

SENATE COMMITTEE
CLEgANS HOUSE FOR
FINN PRO BMSI

WILL SOON CONSIDER
31-EA SIRE PA SSED
LOWER BODY

EXCISE
BY

Technic Will Appear Today;
To Feature Transportation
Appearing for the first time today tary-treasurere of the Lake Carriers'
with an entirely specialized issue, this association, while three articles have
one devoted to the subject, "Transpor- been written by University men.
tation," the March number of the Ralph Upson, noted aeronaut and
Technic, quarterly magazine of the designer of the United States lighter-
students in engineering and architect- than-air craft during the war who is
ure, will introduce another innovation 'offering a special lecture course here
in that it will be placed on general this semester has contributed an ac-
campus sale. count of "Airships That Pass in the
The editors feel that this number Night." Prof. H. C. Sadler of the
will have an especially wide appeal marine engineering department and
in that many prominent leaders in all I Prof. A. H. Lovell of the electrical en-
lines of transportation have contribut- gineering department have contributed
ed to the magazine and all phases of articles. "Military Transportation"
the subject have been touchd upon. is the subject of the article by Maj.
In addition the publication is profuse- I L. B. Moody of the Army War college
ly illustrated, while headlining this at Washington D. C.
feature is the cover design "The Spir- Other articles have been written
it Of Transportation," by R. F. Hein- by William B. Stout, Detroit airplane
rich, noted Detroit artist. manufacturer, and Gardner S. Wil-
"The Transportation system of the liams, local consulting engineer and
Great Lakes" has been presented in vice-president of the American Engin-
this issue by George A. Marr, secre- eering council.

MINORITY PARTY TRIES
TO CHANGE INCOME TAX

Hear Army, Navy Officers in
On Soldiers' Bonus Bill
Approval

Quizz

ASSURED HARDING
HIS NOIAIN
DAUGHERTY, PENROSE, AND HAYS,
TOOK THOUSANDS, DECLARES
AL JENNINGS
PROMISCUOUS USE OF-
PUBLIC MONEY CHARGED
"Cost To Get New York Delegation,"
Says Jake Ramon to
Ex-Train Robber
Washington, March, 27.-(By A. P.)
-Al Jennings, once a famous train
robber and now a California real es-
tate dealer, related today before the
oil committee one of the most unusual
tales congressional investigators had
ever heard.
It recalled a million dollar payment
which he charged figured in the repub-1
lican national convention at Chicago
in 1920. He said his only information,
had come from the late Jake Hamon
who at the time was the republican
national committeeman from Okla-

Library Book Exhibit Shows
Early Progress In Printing

Fifteenth century books which show
the progress and evolution of early
printing have been placed on display
at the William L. Clement's library.
All of the volumes are printed in La-
tin and represent the work of presses
in many medieval centers of learning,
as Cologne, Leipsig, Venice, Florence
and Milan. The books shown have
been selected from different printers
so that the varying types of works
produced by the greatest men in thel
profession at that time can be in-
spected.
One of the earliest volumes in the
collection is one printed by Johann
Mentelin at Strasburg in 1471. Mente-
line was a notary and writer in gold,
and is mentioned with Gutenberg and
Fust, two other German printers, as
printing 330 sheets a day as early as

' E E TA O B g i D E T R O IT C

1458. His work remained anonymous
until 1473. Bibles and the works of
the Fathers on theological questions
made up most of his productions,
which numbered about 35 titles.
An example of Florentine printing
of 1471 is also included in the exhibit
but though printing was introduced
this early in Florence it did not be-
come popular until some years later,
because the people of that city pre-
ferred more finely written manu-
scripts. Besides the works on theolo-
gical and religious subjects in the dis-
play there are works on history and
science and one or two of Latin
poetry. One of the books shown is
also particularly interesting because
it is from the library of Peter Martyr
d'Anghiera, a man who wrote one of
the first geographies mentioning
America.

Washington, D. C., March 27.-(By
A. P.)-Renewing their program of
day and night 'sessions, the senate
finance . committee today tactfully
cleared up the many administrative
problems of the revenue bill, The
schedules of excise and miscellaneous
taxes which were revised by the house
are to be taken up immediately.-
Democratic members of the commit-
tee spent another afternoon in another
unsccessful effort to reach an agree-
ment on the income tax schedule
which they will offer as a substitute
for the Mellon rates, voted into the
bill by the finance committee,,
The surtax rates proved the stumbl-
ing block. Senator Simmons of N.
C., ranking democrat on the commit-
tee, presented amschedule, it is under-
stood, followed the general line of the
Gardner plan supported by house de-
mocrats with a revision of brackets
and a reduction of the minimum rates
to about 40 per cent.
before taking up the revenue bill
the committe heard army and navy
officers on the soldier bonus bill
passed by the house with a view to
determining the number of veterans
who would be eligible to the insurance
provision and the average length of
service of the' veterans.
'A representative of the navy and
,marine corps said their records would
be able to show the figures needed.
Army officers explained considerable1
work would be required to lay the
foundation. for the administration of
the proposed bill.r
I TA KAPPA TO
INITIATE WELVE HRE
Phi Delta Kappa, national profes-
sional educational fraternity, will ini-
tiate twelve men, among ' whom will
be T. E. Johnson, State 'superinten-
dent of schools, next Wednesday eve-
ning at the Union. .
Candidates for the fraternity must
be either students in the school of edu-
cation or members of the faculty. An-
nouncement of the initiation was
madeYesterday by T. Luther Purdom
instructor of educational phychology
and president of the Michigan chap-
ter of Phi Delta Kappa.
Foreign Students
Given Invitations
Invitations have been received from
eight Jackson homes expressing a de-
sire to entertain foreign studeits dur-
ing the coming spring recess, April
11 to, 2. At least four Chinese, four
Japanese, two South African, two Ha-
waiian, two Spanish American, and
several Philippine students are desir-
ed, as well as a number of others, ac-
cording to Prof. J; A. Iildner, of the
Gereman department.
Students who are interested in mak-
ing the trips should see Professor
Hildner as soon' as possible at 4
o'clock on any day except Wednes-
day, in room302, University hall.
British Flyer Heads for Rome
Cibita, Becchia, Italy, March 27.-
Staurt MacLaien, piloting the British
round the world airplane landed here
at 5:45 o'clock this evening from
Lyons on the second stage of the flight.
He will proceed to Rome tommorrow
morning.

'27 WILL [GATHE[R
AT 0DAN CE. TO NIB H T
Seymour Simons And Jordan's To
Purnish Music Starting
At 9 o'clock
HARRINGTON TO LEAD GRANT)
MARCH WITH SYLVIA FUOCO
Freshmen will hold their annual for-
mal dance tonight in the ball room
of the Union. Dancing will start at 9
o'clock and end at 2 o'clock. The
grand march, which is to be led by
Mark Henry Harrington, '27E, cony-j
mittee chairman, and Miss Sylvia
Fuoco, will begin at 9:30 o'clock with!
Seymour Simon's, '17E, orchestraJ
playing "The Victors." At the end of
the march a picture will be taken of
the dancers.-
Assisting Simons in supplying the
music of the evening, which will be
continuous, will be Jordans' orchestra.
of Louisville, ky. Jordan played ati
this year's. J-Hop, and is known for
his novelty selections. Simons has
playeda number of times in Ann Ar-.
boi, and wrote the music for two Un-
ion operas w.hile he was a student at
the University.
A number of special features have!
been arranged for the dance tonight,
spotlight numbers, and special songs
by Jordans' inusicians being th'e most
original of them. Fine -blue leather
programs, embossed with a gold Mic-
igan seal go with the dance. No cor--
sages will be allowed.f
The patrons and patronesses are:
President Marion L. Burton and. Mrs.
Burton, Dean John R. Effinger andI
Mrs. Effinger, Dean M. E. Cooley and
Mrs. Cooley, Dean George W.
Patterson and Mrs. Patterson,
Prof. Emil Lorch and Mrs. Lorch,
Profs Ralph Aigler and Mrs. Aigler,
Prof. Peter Field and Mrs. Field, Prof.
E. M. Bragg and Mrs. Bragg, Prof. W.
! A. Frayer and Mrs. Frayer, Robert
A. Campbell and Mrs. Campbell, Prof.
P. E.Bursley and Mrs. Bursley, and
Prof. Wintred Cok and Mrs. Cook.
Favors, which are in the form of!
silver letter cutters, and dance pro-,
grams will be given out from 2 to 5I
this afternoon in the main Union
lobby.
'HUSSEYOUBTS SKUL
Doubt was cast upon the authenti-
city of the "pre-glacial pan" skull,

TO0 GIVE LECTURE,
Astronomist Will Give First Speech
Today On "Statistics And
Philosophy"
IS HEAD OF OBSERVATORY
AT SWEDISH UNIVERSITY!
Prof. C. V. L. Charlier, director of
the observatory at Lund University,
Sweden. arived late last night in Ann
Arbor, to deliver several lectures on
mathematical statistics and astron-
omy. The first lecture which is on
"Statistics and Natural Philosophy"
will be given at 4:15 o'clock today in
the west lecture room of the physics.
[building.
He was born in Ostersund, Sweden
in 1862. After studying and teaching
at the University of Upsala, he became
profe'sor and director of the obser-
vatory at Lund University in 1897.
He is the founder of the "Proceedings
of the Lund Astronomical Observa-
tory," to which he has been the chief
contributor. Upon the completion of
the fifth volume in 1922, and in honor
of hlis sixtieth birthday, students and.
fellow contributors voiced their desire.
to dedicate this:.volume to Professor
Charlie:' as an evidence of their. great
debt of gratitude to him aind in appre-
ciatioii of the value: f his. teaching
and his scientific work.
A wide knowledge of mathematical
statistics has been the reason for the 1
-O-Oat following which has been shown
in Professor Charlier's work. The
work in ma.thematical statistics has
connected itself up with many dit-
fernt branches of science.
He has been chiefly interested in
the application of mathematical stat-I
istics to astronomy, and in the de-
velopment of pure theory. Theories
which he has developed are now being
applied in economics, biology, edu-
cation, physics and other sciences I
where statistical measurements are
made. -
Professor Charlier in a letter accept-
ing the joint invitation of the depart-
ments of mathematics and astronomy,
stated that his lectures will not be
highly technical but will attempt to
bring out the underlying and funda-
mental ideas in mathematical statis-
tics and their application. Students i
and members of the faculty are invt- I
ed to attend these lectures.
lie will be the guest at a dinner to
jbe given in his honor by the Math-'
ematical club at 6:15 o'clock tonight
at the Union. Later in the evening he
will be entertained at a smoker at1
the University club.:

homa,
In a Chicago hotel room during
the convention, the witness said, Ha-
mon told him that examination ac-
cording would cost him one million
dollars; that he, Hamon, had put
up $250,000 and this sum to the latef
Senator Penrose, of Penn; $25,000
to Harry M. Daugherty; $25,000 to
Will Hays, the chairman of 'the re-
publican national comnmittee and an-
other $25,000 to a fourth man from
Ohio named Manning, or somethingE
similar.
Besides, he quoted Hamon as say-
ing. "Money was 'used indiscrimin-
ately with, the Oklahoma delegation."
Jennings said he did not recall that
he had been told of any other payment
of money.
It also was a part of the story that
Daugherty, IHays and others had re-
ceived to make Hanlon Secretary
of Interior. That Hamon was to take
over what the denocratic administra-
tion had left to the public lands; and
that Hamon "expected to make a great
deal of money of them, and. then'-get
himself elected as the next president.

1IIN SOUTH DAKOTAi
Semi-Official Returns Give Senator{
Lead of 1,743 Votes Over
Coolidge
PRESIDENT NOW HAS TOTAL
OF 35,500; HIRAM 40,243
Sioux Falls, S. D., March 27.-(By
A. P.)-Basing their statements on
very complete and official returns, the
Sioux Falls Argus leader and the Mit-
chell Republican this afternoon de-
clared Senator Hiram Johnson had
won Tuesday's Republican presiden-
tial preference primaries in South Da-
kota.
Returns compiled by: these news-
papers including a number of semi-
official reports of county auelitors,
gave the Senator a lead of 1,743 votes
over President Coolidge and 'all but
50 precincts had reported. These re-
turns from 1,684 precents out of a few
more than 1,825 in the state, gave
Johnson 40,243 votes and Coolidge 38,-
500.
LAFOLLETE TCONTRACTS
PNUOIA; REPST WE[[L'

2 DETROIT TEAMSINH ,[
Northwestern, Southeastern, Jackson
Muskegon Win First Round
Games
COLTS ELIMINATE BATTLE
CREEK IN CLOSE BATTLE
Detroit Northwestern, Jackson,1
Muskegon and Detroit Southwestern
survived the first round of the State
Class A ,Interscholastic basketball
tournament held last night in Water-
man gymnasium and will be paired off
to meet tonight in the semi-finals. The
consolation series will start at 3
o'clock this afternoon.
Northwestern defeated the Battle
Creek five in a nip and tuck game in
the first contest of the evening, 19-17.
Northwestern's lead was. a slim two
points as the half ended, the score be-
ing 9-7. With McCoy playing a stellar
shooting game, Northwestern forged
to the front in the final quarter, af-
ter Dundore had brought his tean into
a deadlock with the final winners.
Summaries:'
Northwestern Battle Creek.
Guinnip R.F. Beller
McCoy' . L.F. Dundore
Fairbairne C. - Schroder
More R.G. Rands
MacKay L.G. Bevier
After playing to a deadlock, 8-9 in
the initial period, Bay City's quintet1
succumbed to the all-round play of
Jackson's court five, the latter wir.-.
ning 16-11.
Summaries:
,Jackson , Bay City.
Fogg R.F. Anderson I
Drain LF. . Little
Jaganow C. Schweinsberg,
Russo R.G. PenbrokeI
Fuller L.G. Lefler
Mukegon, last year's champions, de-
feated Pontiac 22-17, after having
their lead threatened several times.
Oosterbaan's superb shooting offset'
the efforts of the Pontiac team. Poor

ENGINEERS CAN TAKE '
YEARS IN CITY AND
ENTER JIERE
CARRITT TO TAKE PC
OF PARKER NEXT Y
Leave Granted Wilgus, Tal
Brumni, Sunderland and Oth
Frayer Given Professorhii
Similar action to that taken
Albion and other small oolev
the state was approved for the C
of the City of Detroit at a meeti
the Board of Regents held last
The plan provides that after .
years at the Detroit college, th
dents may enter the Engineerit
partment of the University, and
end of the first year here, reci
bachelor's degree from his or
school, and at the end of the s
year receive a similar degree
the University. A schedule of
to be used in connection with the
has been compiled.
Prof. William A. Frayer was
moted to full professorship an
A. S. Aiton to assistant professc
in the historydepartment.
R ~Leaves Granted,
Leaves of absences were gr
to Prof. H. F. Wilgus of the
school, because of ill health;
Rene Talamon of the French d
ment, who will spend next ye
France; Prof. E. R.Sunderland
Law school to go to Englhd;
DeWitt H. Parker of the philoi
department, who will ,go ?to the
versity of California to lectur
th'e Ellis foundation; Dr. Geori
LaRue of the zoology departme
attend the school of hygiene and
lic health at Johns Hopkins; , I
o. Davis of the School of Educl
who will devote the year to wri
Prof. R. T. Crane of the politica
ence department; Prof. C. J. Co
the mathematics departent
will enter the Univeristy of I
Prof. P. E. Bursley, of the Ron
Languages department, whose
will start- April-11 and con
through next yea; Prof. J. R. Bi
of the rhetoric partment, Vhc
study European 'uinalism ad.
H. F. Adams of the psychology de
mont. who wilt employ the tin
writing.
Philosopher To Come
Announcement was made that
E. R. Carritt of Oxford universit3
be here next year in the absen
Prof. DeWitt H. Parker of the ph
phy department. Professor Car
considered the' leading philosopl:
England. Prof. C. 0. Carlso
Doane College, Nebraska, will
the place of Dr. George E. LaRue
ing his absence from the Univers
The resignation of Prof. A. L.,
son of the Dental college was ac
ed. A conference of deans of m
be held here April 24 to 26 wa
nounced and the receipt of a g
$650 to conduct certain research
in the engineering school fron
Detroit Foundrymen's associatio
acknowledged'
Paris, March 27.-M. Poincar
formed President Millerand this
ing that he had accepted the ta
resuming the premiership and
solidating a ministry.
Mr. Poincare this afternoon g
led with the great difficulties of o
izing his cabinet to fit the new
itical situation resulting from
chambers attitude on the pensio
and to accord with the policy a
I onomics for which he has foug
far. In conclusion after the
negotiations all he said to the r
paper men was "it is going t

long."
YOST ADDRESSES PORT HUR
LUNCHEON CLUBS ON SEW

The-Day's News At
ThewCapitvol_
Senator Borah offered a resolution
looking to a combined economic dis-
armament conference in Washington.
Tax returns of "Mellon's compan-
ion",. were explained before the senate
committee investigating the bureau j
and inland 'revenue.
The new immigration bill provides
a' basis at two per cent at the 1914
census, was reported by the senate
immigration committee.
Rep. John Langley, of Kentucky,
and five others were indicted on charg-
es of conspiracy to obstruct the op-
erations of the government.
. Al Jennings, told before the com- 1
mittee that Jake Hamon revealed him
a plan to nominate Warren G. Hard-
ing at Chicago in 1920, and that it had
cost Hamon one million dollars.
The oil committee subpoenaed the
treasury of the Democratic national
committee, George White, the former
chairman and P. L. Dohney to inquire
about campaign funds.
The senate charity committee heard
the fourth examination of Roxie Stin-
son on charges by H. L. Fcaife that
he had been blocked in efforts to ex-
pose alleged aircraft frauds.
HOBBS WILL DELIVER1
ILLUSTRATED LtECTURE1
Prof. William If.' Hobbs of the geo-
logy department will deliver an illus--
trated .lecture on Earthquakes at 8
o'clock tonight in Natural- Science au-
I ditorium. The lecture. is to be given
under the joint auspices of Sigma Xi
and the' Junior Research club;
The address is the second of a series
of three which are sponsored by the
societies each year. Heretofore 'the
speakers have been brought from out-
side of Ann Arbor, but this year it was
decided to draw upon campus repre.
sentatives. Prof. E. C. Case of the
geology department delivered the first

Washington, D. C., March 27.-Sen-
ator LaFollette, of Wisconsin. who
is ill at his home here with pneu-
monia, was said by Dr. C. C. Marbury,
the attending physician, to' have had
a very restful day. A bulletin issued
this morning after a consultation of
physicians announcing that Senator
LaFollette was suffering with pneu-
monia was a shock to his friends who
had been expecting an early return
to congressional duties.
GOOD0 BRANDS CHAES
By JOHNSONAS Ul-TRUE
Washington, March 27.-Charges
by Senator Johnson, of California,
that "shameless expenditures were
made by the Coolidge campaign man-
agers in South Dakota" are not true,
former Rep. James W. Good, in charge
of Coolidge headquarters at Chicago,
declared in a statement here tonight.
Weary Ones Get
'Move On' Order
Hoboes, numbering as high as a
hundred or more, are kicked put of
Ann Arbor every day, the local po1ice
department reported yesterday.
A small crop of "panhandlers", of
drifters, seeking the price of a cup of,
coffee have put in their appearanceI
about the campus. This happens
every spring, police say.
"Pardon me, fella' could you do me
'a l'il favor--?", thus a shabby, unshav-
en, unkempt, typically hobo indivi-
dual solicited aid from a student en-
route to an 8 o'clock yesterday morn-
ing at the corner of State and Huron
streets. He got his dime, walked up
to Liberty street crossed State at that
point, walked north, crossed the street.
again and resumed his post. Another
8 o'clocker, another dime.
Many Gargoyles Returned
Nearly 50 copies of the last issue ofE
Gargoyle have been returned to the
offices through lack of sufficient post-
age. These copies were all mailed by
students to out of town destinations,!
stamping them with one cent stamps.I
Two cents postage is required on mail

shooting at close range cost the gameI
for the losers.
Mukegon Pontiac
Felt R.F. McLeod
De Vette L.F. Orman
Oosterbaan C. Heitsch
Johnston . R.G. 'Maddock
Casper L.G. Gray
Detroit Southeastern accounted for
the easiest win of the evening, de-
feating the Negaunee five, 25-11. The
losers were a fighting aggregation but
were unable to hold Noble, who scor-
ed 18 points.
Southeastern Negaunee
Noble R.G. Maki
Phelps L.F. Gunry
Springer C. Beldo
Puttmdn R.G. Ronberg
Hendricks L.G. Frassetti

,:

recently unearthed by a San Francisco
excavator, by R. C. Hussey, instruc- II
tor of the geology department last
night before the Geological Journal
club.
Mr. Hussey reviewed Wilder's
"Man's Prehistoric Past." Most of his
attention was devot'ed to discussing Dayton, 0., March 27.-L
the pre-glacial man's rise from the R. Harris, of McCook fiel
almost-bestial state to the state ed a new and official alti
wherein he made crude pottery. In
concluding the review, he said that he today for airplanes carry
thoughtsthe sbook oftconsiderable l of 551shounds. InstrumE
value, as it presents time important plane showed that he react
facts concerning, prehistoric man so of 28,411 feet. Little ch
' c iinetedi n final official ca

MAES
.ieut. Harold
d, establish-
itude record
ying a. load
ents on his
hed a height
ange is ex-
libration.

x
CI
7

Due to mechanical difficulties, rad-
iophone station WCBC was unable to
broadcast its regular Thursday mid-
night program last night.

clearly.

I_ pvG LGt4 ." Al.-A Vtaa4lw -

MAN! NOT SO HOT
ANYMORE

CONSPIRACY CHAR GE
Washington, March 27.-(By A. P.)
-Representative John W. Langley, re-
publican of Kentucky, was indicted by]
a federal grand jury here today on a'
charge of conspiracy to interfere, with
operation of the government.
Two indictments were returned
against Langley, one individually and

Quit smoking-but fire of progress
still blazing. The money he pre-
viously used for cigarettes and
tobacco, he is now investing in a
Ford or something worse. See our

STEAL 'SIGN; GET DOLLAR;
DISCOVER STEALING PAYS,
Two Ann Arbor youngsters are
now firmly convinced that it
pays to have taking habits. As
a result of their taking a sign
from the window of the Campus
Bootery shop they were reward-
ed with a dollar. bill.
The proprietor of the store
missed a large advertising sign
that had been posted in front of
his store and immediately notifi-

I

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
NOTICE
The Board in Control of Stu-
dent Publications will hold its
meeting for the appointment of
managing Editors and business
managers of student publications
on May 10, .1924. Each. appli-
cant for a position. is requested
to file seven copies of his letter
of application at the Board office
in the Press Building not later
than May 6, for the use of the
seven members of the Board.
Carbon copies, if legible will be
satisfactory. Each letter should.
state the facts as to the appli-
cant's scholastic record in the
University, his experience, his
experience upon the publications
n no~hn-no n o +h onI

Port Huron, March 27.-Wit
vice' to society as the keynote
talk, Coach Fielding H. Yost
University of Michigan address
luncheon of the Rotary, L!ons a
wanis clubs.
Present at the meeting also
Boy Scouts, business ^n and
egation of Michigan eumni.
Yost spoke here last night at t
nual banquet of the Church Basl
league.
Bursley To Visit France

I1

t'

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