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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 18, 1924 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-03-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. "-

IAL NVIEWSPAPER OF THE
fL'ERSIIY OF MJCIGAi
tFhe U i er ty y :a by the Board in,
oc 5 .;dent ublications.
cof e conference Ejtonral
the use -ToirubLicattn of al' ne w
e citede i t rn tu w~
" :-"tfh ~l?7Itrtnl,!~"~± 1 f .1AF par andthe local ['",b
( at tihe ofice at Ann Arbe-.
r? ' Sc' i'.>itl .{ r i±r. ,.'Ip a s6 a tu
ac girauted by Th:+d A snan Po st
<;c nerai.
riptiod by carrier, -I83.5 by mii
s Ann Arbor Press uilking. May
es: Editorial, 24a4 and 764; i
I cOcmranications not exceeding goo
will br published in T e 1>iiy at
retion of the Editor. Upon tequcst,
ntity of communicant. will be
as confidential.
EDITORIAL STAFF
elepones, 2414 and 176-M
AANAGING EDITOR
HARRY D. HOEY
Editor..............Robt. B. ,rr
3 board Chairman....U. C Moria.ty
ditor.............. . G.;arlinghouse
Night Editors
Ailes A. n. Connaie
lilli11grori I. E. Fisike
C. Clark P. M. Wagner
Editor..............Ralph N. Bjers
's Editor..........,Wiona Hibbard
Magazine Editor.....F. L. Tiiden
Editorr.............Ruth A Hoelt
it City Editor,. 1 .enneth C. Kell
r Michigan News Bureau..R. G, Ramsay
Editorial Board

World war. The proclamation, issued
,pon the recommendation of former
)ecretary Denby and Secretary Weeks,
'while it restores citizenship to post-
war deserters, does not remit or com-
l ,tc the court martial passed upon
these men.
Ex-Secretary Denby has described
hem as men who were mere boys at.
lhe time of their desertion; that they
were not able to realize the terrible
"ou.,equence of their offences and per-
onal shame which it involved. He has
lO spoken of the sentences imposed
ilpon I eie h:arsh and severe.
The sentences were harsh. True,
these men deserted, but their desertion
did not place our land in a dangerous
position. America had been victorious
and the folly of a few homesick men
meant nothing else than violation of
military discipline. President Cool-
idge believes the sentences were harsh
and that is the reason for his pardon-
ing of them. The war is over, and
making a-man-without-a-country out
-f this sort of deserter, would only act
as a reminder of evil times and as a
means of stirring up otherwise avoid-
able animosity toward the government.
The president has acted wisely in this
case for he has foresight enough to see
.hat no good could possibly come of
keeping these men from the bonds of
citizenship.
A WILL OF WORTH
"To relieve personal distress and
sickness among the poor and needy
of Kansas City, especially among chil-
dren, such as assisting and providing
food, fresh milk, free ice, medical aid
and surgical attention and the like."
Thus the thoroughly admirable will
of .the late Jacob L. Loose of Kansas
City dispenses of the bulk of his two
and a quarter million dollar estate.

-.,there is his wife, and the final renunci-
IEDITORIAL COMMENT .tion as the curtain falls.
Ethel Barrymore, of course, is a
- --_--__-_ - study in herself. In a purely techni-
ACTIVITIES AND PROFESSIONAL cal sense her voice is most disagree-
WORK able-a kind of whiskey hoarseness
(Columbia Spectator) combined with Mrs. Fiske's rapidity-;
but it is thoroughly dramatic and the-
It has been discovered by many atric. She has two postures also that
former college students now enrolled she repeats constantly; one is to low-
in professional schools, but who are er her head toward the floor and roll
still actively interested in college af- her eyes with bovine suspicion, and
fairs, that the pressure of their school the other to fling it toward the coil-
work makes continued ' participation ng and scratch her neck vigorously.
in activities difficult and sometimes It may all sound silly, but it is
~ostty. extremely effective. So realistic! So
In the college, where the student is majestic! the audience cries, as it,
engaged chiefly in acquiring a general sheds a bitter tear.
cultural background, activities are
looked upon as at least a desirable,
]f not an essential, part of undergrad-E
'iate life. Provision is made fog them, OA
and programs of studies are not so in- 3 '7f' "
tense as to make participation dang-
KEEP OFu
erThe professional schools are, how- THE:GRAS
-ver, above all, training institutions The only reason we're telling you
for preparing students for their life to keep off the grass now is because
work. 'The obtaining of the high lights it isn't really time for that sort of
of a profession in a limited number of warning yet, and if we wait any longer
years entails concentrated study, and t will be a Chimes ent-rprise before
with it the justified sacrifice of extra- we know it We're just warning Ba-
curricular matters. 1>n that this grass proposition is a
Hence the two and three-year pro- Rolls enterprise, and for him to stick
fessional option arrangements which to the jolly old Council and Union.
allow a student to enter a professional * * *
s school in his junior or senior year Bake has also revived the hot off
cause a considerable loss to college the Diag col. But it is not the col it
activities, as it is in these 'last two was in the days before its death-a
years that the man becomes a valuable pleasant, whimsical thing that specu-
Sactor in his organization, athletic or lated mildly on the drinking problem
otherwise. "at Michigan." The new col is filled
Time and money count for much in with stuff written by men who have
'he student's life, and it would be ridic- been through something or other and

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ANNOUNCING

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Annual,

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Herman WiseI

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Andrew Propper
Assistants
tcke i. S. Mansfi eld
icknell E. C. M Yck
oxer Verena Moran
Bonine Harold Moore
)Wit Carl OhImacher
C4,te hyde Perce
ia Rlegina ReichmAnn
r~i~ 'Edmnarie :-Serauder
iry C. A. Stevens
ouseworth H 1 Sone
>: "'in Marie Reed
dail N . l W al
,g,, W.13. Waitour

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et7 lieerm'a".
BUSINESS STAFFd
Telephone 961)
BUS1NESS MANAGEE
LAURENCE H. PAVROTt
ta .....Perry M. Hayden
rtsing ..... .W user
lation ...... C. Purdy
aton. ......... .aee ir
Assistantst
V. Carnbel M. L. Ireland
et "Capiisn taroid AkMark'
lltamlrio yro Park,
Conlin *H E. Rose
s Dexter #A. J. Seidmank
ih j,' -Finn' Ge. A. ,Stracke - .
d A. Fox Will \eisef
n 1taght Cf F White
Holland R. C. Winter
TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1924
it Editbr-A. B. CONNABLE, JR.£
WHAT IS YOUR AVERAGE
.arah Caswell Angell hall? I don't
,v where it is." This was a sen-
rI4,iy y sterday to the inquiries
i augal t '1icexamnple of un-
i Uiity with the llniverity camp-
S an isoated case. A ques-
pire of campus questions was cir-t
ted recently among a representa-
number of students, including
and girls of all classes, and the
Its go far to show what the aver-
student knows about his Univer-
Some of these questions, with,
percentage of correct answers giv-
o them, are listed below.
ho is dean of the Law school? 45
cent.
ho is Hugh Cabot? 70 per cent.
hen was the University founded?
er cent.
ho is coach of baseball? 55 per
h is dean of women? 70 per cent.
hat is the name of the engineer-
arch? 10 per cent.
ho is president of the Union? 60
cent.
ho is president of the Student
stian association? 10 per cent.
ho is Jack Kelly? 60 per cent.
ho is editor of The Daily? 20 per
ho is president of your class? 50
cent.
here is the Stearn's Music collec-'
? 70 per cent.
what department is Prof. Wen-
65 per cent.
t what department is Prof. Hobbs?
per cent.'
here is the site of the new Wo-
's League building? 75 per cent.
here is Sarah Caswell Angell hall?
er cent.
me students know their campus
. Others know neither the names"
he prominent University figures
the location of the main buildings.
t of suchknowledge implies a lack
tterest in the University. The stu-
who cannot intelligently answer,
ranger's questions concerning the
pus lowers the stranger's -respect

Many schemes have been advanced for
he distribution and equalization of'
money and its subsequent comfort, but F
few indeed have been effectual to any
degree mainly because they require
+hat people be of uniform ability. In
ny sect or class it is inevitable that
hose of superior talent or intelligence'
will ascend on the shoulders of their
fellows to places of power and re-
sponsibility. Power in its turn intro-
l"uces control over luxurious conveni-
ences and finer. enjoyments.
Is there then a remedy? Possibly
there is one to be discerned in the
ife and death of Mr. Loose. Much
hue and cry has been raised over the
wasting of patrimonies by the heirs
of wealthy men. No doubt exists that'
those- sums diverted to the masses
would materially aid multitudes of
°'lildren in securing a happy and use-
ful manhood or wonfanhood. The in-
heritance tax is slicing enormous holes
n large legacies, but charity funds are
non-taxable. Would it not be entirely
feasible and practicable for men who
will great fortunes to reduce the
amount taxable by giving sums and,
establishing funds for charity so that
the tax would be negligible and the
imount to be given to the heir practic-
thy the same?
Ti' last is merely a suggestion:
there is no fundamentally human rea-
son why larger portions of exceedingly'
wealthy men's estates should not be
no employed. Such a course is both
'iuman and Christian. Perhaps the
path broken by Carnegie, Rockefeller
and more recently, Mr. Loose, will in
time be followed by all men who amass
extraordinary fortunes.
Twenty-Five Years
Ago At Michigan
irom te files of the U. 'of M. Dally,
March 18, 1899.
M. H. Carmody last night won the
annual oratorical contest.As has us-i
-ally been the case, the man securing
(i'rst in delivery won the contest. Mr.
'armody spoke on "Patrick Henry."
The list of entries for the 'Varsity
meet this afternoon and evening is un-
isually large and comprises the best
athletes in college. The wrestling,
boxingcand fencing bouts will begin at
3 o'clock sharp and the track events
will be run off tonight.

'1lous to suggest a full four-year col-
'ege course for every man. Activities
nean little in comparison with the
-reparation for the work of a lifetime.
But we would advise those men who
are reaching the peak of their activi-
ties to consider conditions carefully.
By entering a professional school they
may endanger themselves in their
studies, or be lost to their activities.
Some exceptional students can carly
on in both fields-but they are not in
the majority. -
If a student can spare the time and
money, let him look well into the ad-
vantages of spending his full four
years in the college, remembering
that for the average student activities
must be undergraduate and collegiate.
(Continued from Page One)
all indications should be more beau-
tiful than ever. In addition there will
be numerous tuneful musical numbers
Great care is being taken to pro-
duce atmospheric lighting effects fox
the display of the two settings and
the brilliant costumes. Much time has
I been spent on the color combinations
which will be produced by overhead
lights, reflectors, colored bunch lightE
on the sides and spots from the gallery
and wings.
Professor Brumm of the journalism
department will have complete charge
of the production as in past years
while Helen Brown is general chair-
man of the various committees.,
The scores of "Thank You, Madam"
are on sale this week at the University
Music house; at Graham's, Wahr's,
and Slater's bookstores. They will
also be sold during the performances
at the Whitney Theatre. They con-
,ain the seventeen numbers of the play
and have a colored cover of the same
design as the posters. The scores sell
for two dollars a copy.
-E. L.

have come out bitter, bitter, bitter.
Witness this:
HTNVRY FOR LNOWLEEI)(E
By A. B. A.
The argument usually put forth by
these 9,500 students who do not trouble
themselves to "welcome" or "send off"
the football team, or show their ap-
preciation of the gift of the Alumni-
the Michigan Union-by completing the
pool, and are content to see their
swimming team beaten by every team
in the Conference for want of a satis-
factory place to practice, or when their
football team has a bad year or two as
in 1918-19, start the "down with Yost
talk" and leave the Alumni the job
of bringing material to Michigan with
which to build up a football team,--is
that Michigan men are too "hungry for
knowledge" to be concerned with such
trifles.
However, the same 9,500 are on their
toes at ten minutes of twelve every day
bustling in their seats, interrupting
the lectures and getting ready for the
dash to the boarding house for the
noon meal. Hungry for knowledge :
-well, maybe--
Very depressing indeed.
* * *ri i rr

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"THE LAUGHING LADY," a review
by Robert Henderson.
When Ethel Barrymore opened in
New York with Sutro's "The Laughing
Lady" she received a most terrible
panning from the large majority of
critics. With one voice they ' pro-
nounced the play conventional, hack-
neyed, and unconvincing, while they
egreed that the lady herself was
stagey and stereotyped. But the play
was a success, nevertheless, and it is
an even greater success on the road.
it presents Ethel as the public likes
her, and after all, that is what counts
in the theatre.
Personally "The Laughing Lady"
seemed to me by all odds the most
satisfying vehicle the actress has re-
cently appeared in, and I have seen
her iii some five different parts. It is
true that the play for the most part is
the usual English drawing-room com-
edy of manners, but it mounts defin-
itely to a very tense, repressed climax,
and what is more important, stopsf
there. And what is still more import-
ant, it shows no signs of mock her-
oics or such a silly conclusion as blot-
ted the perfections of "Declassee."

j FROM THE DAILY
Discussion of "The New School of
Business Administration," by Prof.
Edm'und E. Day, a jiu jitsu act and
exhibition of fencing, and music by the
"Michigan Troubadours," a well-
known Ann Arbor dance orchestra,,
will be features at the University
Chamber of Commerce smoker to be
held. at 7:30 o'clock next Wednesday
night in the Assembly la'.: of the
Union.
Edgar Guest, the lad that runs the
1col for the Free Press, is getting out
a natty "Corner" every week. It's a
page that teaches the young folk to
write poetry. Thus Edgar says:
The prize verse this week is by
John N. Jenney, Mt. Clmens, 1111ish.
In pleasant and varied metre, John's
work deserves praise, although his
verse does not sound entirely sincere.
Do not allw alliteration to exercise
too much influence over your inspira-
tion, John.
In another part of the page, how-
ever, the genial Mr. Guest chats a little
too glibly about Tasso and Petrarch
and Keats and Michel Angelo. ...
** *
Letter to Cowles
'My dear Mr. Cowles,
We have with us a seasoned col-
leger. The second semester freshman
who has been smoking since Septem-
ber 25th and just musthavehisciggar-
etteaftereveryclass. Five minutes be-
fore' the hour he gets his package out,
and when prof. says "That will be
all" he has one in his mouth. He
doesn't inhale!
Very truly yours
unchi"
The big C. of C. membership drive1
is going over the top. Those men-
how they go at it! Suchpep! Just
like a bunch of big boys! They've'
made out that this membership drive
that's going to mean so much to Ann
Arbor is just a baseball game-and
they talk about home runs and ball
parks, and go after prospects with all
the dlash in the world. Don't see how

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Wonderful Bargains Offered in Fiction
Non-Fiction - Juveniles - Open Sets

Plublisher's Remainders

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Tables at 25c -s c 75c - $100

"-r, r P pr1
a9: r .

Tremendous Reductions on

Memory Books

Felt Goods

Brief Cases

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Boston Bags

Eversharp Pencils

More B00ks Added Daly

I

The social given by
sophomore class last
man Gymnasium was
cess. 'r1he dancing
about 1 o'clock.

membees of the
night in Water-
a complete suc-
continued until)

At the Athens Theater tonight: The
Waite Comic Opera Company will pre-
sent "Said Pasha." Prices, 10, 20, 30
and 50 cents.
Ian MaclIaren will speak Tuesday
evening on "Some Traits of Scottish
Character," under the auspices of the
Students' Lecture Association.

I

Specii Oftersisach .Day

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