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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 16, 1924 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-03-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

the United States, taking positions of
;eaership in movements among
children which are unappreciated by
XEWQPAPER OF THE the great majority of the people, that

XUI .1 E ii!1ar.rA..5 UK* afar.
JNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
>lished every morning except Monday
g the University yar by the Board in
rol of Student Publications._
mbers of Western Conference Editorial
e Associate'd Press is exclusi-ely en-
to theruie for republication of all rews
cies credited to it or not otherwise
ted in th paper and the local news vub
Stherein.
erer! at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
gan, as second cass matter. Special rate
stage granted by Third Assistar-, Post-
!r Leneral.
scription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
iris: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
St ect.
rues: Editorial, 244 and i76-'&x, Busi
geo.________
ned coi miunlcations, not exceeding 3o0
, will be published in TI-e l.wily at
iscretion of the. Editor. Upon request,
identity of comnirunicant, will be
!d as confidential.
EDITORIAL STAFF;
Telephones, 2414 and 176-M
.AANAGING EDITOR
UARRY D. HOEY
Edito...............Robt. B. lrr
ri Board Chair an.... . C. Moria ty
Editor.............J. G. Garlingliouse
Night Editors
LAilie A . KConuwwbte
. Ii9lingron .riske
C. Clark P. M. Wagner
L9 Editor.............. Rflph N. fliers
tn-a Edlt'r........... Wnona Hibbard
ay Maigazine Editor......F. L. Tioen
cEditor...... ..Ruth A Howell
tant CityEditoInr... .Kenneth C. Kellr
tor Michigan News Bureau..R..G. Ramsay
E-litorial Board

the future safety and sepurity from
invasion of the Uuited States rests in
a burden far heavier than any others
shall ever be asked to carry.
There has been inaugurated in this:
country a movement which has spread
to include practically all of the civil-!
ized world, known as the Youth Move-I
ment. The programs to be carried
out here the latter part of April in
connection with Boy's Week are but,
a small part of the greater movement,;
as is the recent move of the Univer-
sity Aeronautical society in inaugur-
ating a contest for model aeroplanes,!
and both deserve the support and ap-
probation of the citizens of this city.,
The tendency of the world today is
towards absolute destruction of self,
for there are those who claim, and
with some degree of justification, thatI
should there be another war the dead-
ly implements which have already been
invented to snuff out human life would
turn upon their creators, and all life E
and happiness would be the price paid
for the folly.
The true solution therefore lies in
training the youth of the country to
believe in higher ideals than do their
fathers; to have as an instinctive part
of themselves honesty, sterling worth,
and an absolute abhorance of any-
thing in the nature of international
strife. As Coach Fielding H. Yost has
said, "The solution of the world's pro-
blems today lies in the solution of the
youth problem."

EDITORIAL COMMENT A D LL
'RITTH VS.TAL ES
* WE'VE JOINEU,
_(The Oklahoma Daily) HAVE YOU
Years ago, some bard wrote "noth-
ing is as bad as it seems." Up top is just irony. We really
Thank heaven for that. haven't signed up at all.
To the unacquainted, a session of a * * *
group of students would be a revela- A lady's never "fat"
tion in how deep in the mire the youth But "plump"-
of America can sink and still be proud It gives her dignity
of the fac't. A bump
But to those who know the speak- To tell her what we see.
ers in the sessions and have heard
the same tales over and over, chang- The snow is never "wet"-
ing for the worse with each retelling It's "feathery, flaked"
the stories carry little weight. A statue's always "nude"
Most prominent in sessions that men Not "naked",
hold on the campus is the talk of wild For that would be too rude.
parties. Booze parties, and wild -P.L.
times that one or the other of the
students have been on, are told over FIRST MAIL IN A WEEK
and over whenever a listener can be Mr. Jason Cowles
found or when the old listeners be- The Michigan Daily
come tolerant enough to sit through Ann Arbor, Mich.
the retelling. Sir:-
Usually the wildest tales have but May we not beg for the attention
little foundation. Exaggeration and of everyone for a brief moment in
misleading statements paint up the order to urge that a distinction be
pink scenes of the youngsters' lives ,nade between
to a lurid red or vermillion. The thrill- "with regards to"
ing scenes are repeated until the tell- and
er almost begins to accept the story "with regard to"
himself as the truth. It is all right to close letters "with
It all puts the younger student in regardA to all the family" but in a
a bad atmosphere. Stories of drink.- more business-like communication
ing and dissipation which the youth could we not omit that unnecessary
may have been taught to look with . "s" and say "with regard to the price
askance upon while at home and treat of butter"? IS this too much to ask
any such occurrences as dark shame- of an enlightened University Com-
ful secrets of the past are extolled iunity?
by the men in the session. Prooins and Prisms
The impression on the young men
is obvious. The older boys whom This morning the Iirst issue of a
they look to for leadership and hold column called "The Stroller iasses
as examples of what a real college By" appears on the Women's Page.
man should be, do not hold such'prac- We suppose we should wish it luck
tices as disgraceful. The consequent I and all that sort of thing, but we don't
result is the weakening of the moral wish people luck very well. Never
fabric of the college studatnts. can muster the right tone, somehow.
If a ban could be placed on the re-I**
., BOOK REVIEW IN THE lEW Y
citation of wild parties" in houses
all over the campus, a moral cons- ANALYTICAL MANNER
1 1 P.1"lrCi17~j i 1dJI 1' n w honk "Th I

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ANNOUNCING

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Herman Wise
Andrew Proppet-
Assistants

Raetke R. S. Mansield
a Bicknell E. C. Mack
an Boxer Verena Moran
aret 1Sonine hIarold Moore
grown Carl Ohianicher
dette c<,te Hyde Peret
r. arin Regina Reihmns
Id Ehrlkb Fdarie Sclraudcr
,enry C. A. Stevens
Y, "-ine W. 11 Soneitai
ng llouseworth H. .R Stone
tes ,1 n t Marie eed
sKendall ,N. R. 'Thal
h Krugtr W. J. Waltour
beth Lieberman
S USINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
lAURENCE H. FAVROT
rtising ....... . ... L. . Dunne
rtisiig Perry Al. Hayden
rtisng...... .. . ..W. Rosser
tisi n .......t.. .K. Scheer
}Laits.......... .:..ii. . Hale
ation....... .... C. Purdy
cation .. ...Lawrence Pierce
+ A iltnts
W. Campbell 1,..L Ireland
te Caplan ¢h arold A. Mark
.Chmpion il3ron Parkei
Conlin MACII E. Rose
s M. Dexter Z aA. J. Seidman
Ai J. Finn X eo.A Stracke
dA. Fox Will Weise
en Ilight * l. F. White
, Iloihari. R. C. Winter-
SUNDAY, 'ARCH 16, 1924 j
ht Editor--THOMAS E. FISKEI
iING A LA IEAN SOMETHING
here are, it js-safe to say, scores
scores of laws and acts that so far
vorth is concerned are of little or
account. This can result because
lifferent reasons, and one of the
t important ones it appears is the
rowing of laws. By this we mean.
the law or any act brought into
.g say fifty years ago may lose its
icular applicability in the present
And the place whre the trouble
stupidity arises is that even
igh these laws are of no use to-
and in aigny instances hinder the
ral welfare, yet they nevertheless
inue eing enforced. This is waste-
d reiardlng..The thIlng to do is to
om way change the law so that it
be of use to-day. An act of
erdgty s in 'nany instances of use
r t;'e!terday. And in connection
t what has just been said it is well
inrent on the bill recently in-
nceed into Congress by Represen-
e Joh L. Cable of Ohio to amend
act requiring returns of cam-
n expenditures.
te law as it now stands is so aged
It fails to recognize the rights of
en to hold. office as provided by
suffrage amendment to the United
es Constitution. As a matter of
it has been on the statute books
so log that it still refers to the
ion' of senators by state legisla-
s. And what is more, no senator
equired to file a statement of ex-
es and receipts. All this the
,tor fr9im Ohio would remedy.
he proposed amendment will re-
e a fiing of statements through-
the year eand a more frequent fill-
just prior to elections.j
ie amendment is a decided step in
righ-t direction, and although it is
as clarifying as it might be it
perhaps be the beginning of a
s of such laws in the different
s where at present there is no law
mit to the amount that a Senator
tepresentative can spend during a
paign.

A NEW LIGHT IN POLITICS
Judge William S. Kenyon has re-
fused the navy secretaryship left va-
cani by the resignation of Edwin Den-
by. His refusal, he declares in a for-1
onal statement, comes after due con-
sideration which leads him to the con-
clusion that he does not possess "the!
essential qualification of training for
the office."
In taking this stand and in view of
the fact that he also asserts, "I have
not considered my personal prefer-
ance in the matter, as I would be will-I
ing to make any sacrifice for real pub
lie service," Judge Kenyon's honesty
with himself does not only deserve,
mention but sincere praise and admir-
ation.
American politicians up to this time,
had yet to refuse the acceptance of aI
position which would benefit them po-
litically, or add distinctly to their pres-
tige, when many have certainly been
unqualified for their office. Judge
Kenyon in rendering the decision he
did "after looking at all sides of aj
question before arriving at a conclu-
sion" has not only taken a step to-,
wards the betterment of politics, but"
has created, perhaps, a. new policy ini
our political world.
The sheep will always need a lead-!
er before they venture into another;
pasture though knowing that the oth-
er pasture may be better fitted for'
them. Judge Kenyon, in refusing the
navy portfolio after coming to theI
conclusion that he is not fitted for the
office, has broken away from the na-{
tural field where political sheep would!
have grazed.j
If Judge Kenyon has arisen as the{
leader after asserting that the second{
pasture is the best policy, and has
stirred new thoughts in the mind of
the political sheep that the second plan
is best, he deserves even more than
sheer praise. It is human nature to
follow the course of the majority, and
it is the -mrse of the majority to fol-
low the path which offers the most
glory. If Judge Kenyon's actions
would assert that there are certain
things we are not capable of, and if
his course would only arouse the same
opinions in political officials, reason-
ing out if they are qualified for the
office, and accept it only if they faith-
fully believe they are, then the judge
has truly been the leader to conduct
the sheep in a better field.
Twenty-Five Years

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ciousness would soon grow up. As a
result, the man who carried tales of
his "parties" would be aIhamned of
then and would keep them to hinwself.
New students or even 'older students'
who had not been influenced by stor-
ies of former years would lose respect
for the man who told about his Wild-
ness.
Then the moral fabric of the indi-
vidual students would be strengthen-
ed and university morals would take
care of themselves.

ranmerSpitzr u s new uooit ,. ne
Uncivil Anstruthers", is a curiously
brilliant study of American life. Spitz-I
bub, who combines the grace of Dreis-
er with the sweep of Ezra Pound;
who thinks with all the clarity of a
T. S. Eliot without losing the poig-
nant sense of tragedy so well exem-
plified in the work of Stan islas Zybysz-
ko, has nevertheless packed into his
book a vast deal of the mawkish sen-
timentality that one finds in the stuff
if such ninth and tenth raters as Mol-
nar and Schnitzler.
Oh well, finish it yourself. You
must know some more names.
* * *

Bi

1,

RUTH DRAPER, the noted character
artist, will be presented in a recital of
her original sketches April 7, in the
Whitney Theatre under the auspices
of the Ann Arbor Branch of the Amer-
ican Association of University Women.
Ruth Draper,who appeared here last
year with unusual success, has been #
scoring a personal triumph this season+
in New York at the Selwyn Theatre.
She has been presented there every;
Friday afternoon and Sunday evening I
continuously from October through
February, and the critics have unan-
imously pronounced her art greater=
than ever.j
In a technical sense, she is a monol-
ogist in that she gives the entire pro-
gram herself without even the aid of
settings or costumes. But in reality
she is much more than this:she is a
stagefull of actresses, she recreates
to the fullest measure the dignity and
reality of the scene she is portraying.
Her present program, consisting of,
entirely new numbers, is reported to
be even more finely blended with sa-
tire and pathos than the production
presented here last year. In detail,
it will include "A German Governess",
"A Southern Girl at a Dance", "A
Class in Soul Culture", "On a Porch
in a Main-Coast Town", "At the Court
of Philip IV", and "A Scotch Immi-
grant."

We have at our side a copy of the
"Optimist", a paper published by the
Students of the Ann Arbor High
School. And we cannot see why they.
publish it. Don't see why anybody
writes it, prints it, reads it, pays for l
it, don't see anything about it.
All this Mr. and Miss stuff. Mr.J
Hiawatha, who is suffering from the
chickenpox, has been absent for the
past week.
Absent.....
Friedrich Traubenwein has return-
ed to school after a severe attack of
the mumps, which confined him to his
home for two weeks.
Mumps. . . .
A lot of jokes scattered around.
Little Harry: I wish I were you, un-
cle.
Uncle (who has been invited to din-
. ner) : W y do o wih that, on-
ny?
Little Harry: Be-au e they don't pun-
ish you when you cat with your'
knife.
The tremendous list of "editors", in
which all the ones that are too long I
to go in one line are contracted, re-
sulting in such revolting garglings
as Circl'n Mgr and Assistant Bus Mgr.
They have also a "Chuckles Editor"
Chuckles. . .
The editorials about school spirit
and student government.
An account of the meeting of the
Radio Club, where some little fel
"spoke on the life of Marconi".
Mr. Jason Cowles
DETROIT UNITED UNES
EAST BOUND
Limiteds: 6 a. m., 9:10 a. m. and
every two hours to 9:10 . m.
Express: 7 a. m., 8 a. m. and ea-v'y
two hours to 8 p. m.
Locals: 7 a. m., 8:55 a. ,n. and4
every two hours to 8:55 p. m.,
11 p. .. To Ypsilan only, 11:46
p. mn., 12:25 a.,in. and 1:15 a. m.
WEST BOUND
Limiteds: 8:47 a. m. and every two
hours to 8:47 p. m.
Express (making local stops): 9:50
a. m. and every two hours to 9:50
p. m.
Locals: 7:50 a. m., 12:10 a. m.

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op

From the files of the U. of M. Daily,
Mar. 16, 1899.
A report that is stirring up consid-s
erable merriment on the University
campus is to the effect that a profes- 1
sor whose field lies in the realm of
high art, offers to give private instruc-
tion to a student who will attend reg-
ularly to the milking of the professor's
cow. The contrast between sublime
aims and humble means for accom-
plishing them is frequently seen
among Ann Arbor students, but the
picture of an embryo artist balancing
all his delicate sensitiveness on a!
milking stool in a stable is a difficult
one to conceive.

THE JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY has al-j
ways had local color incorporated in
its book and this year's productionj
"Thank You, Madam", is no exception.
Much of the comedy depends on sat-
ire about current Michigan customs
especially since one of the acts is laid
in Ann Arbor.
Seventeen song andtdance num-
b rs are mingled with the story, and
particular attention has been paid to
the color schemes of the costumes to
furnish a harmonious background for
the action. Indeed if effort and atten-
tion to detail aid a production in its
success, much has already been done,
to insure it.
Besides the technical possibilities
of the performance. however, the Jun-

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