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March 08, 1924 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-03-08

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THE WEATHER

Po a owpl,

COLDER AND SNOW
TODAY

Sit waf

:4I.atI j

ATTEND THE

FAIR

VOL. XXXIV. No. 116

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 1924

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE, FIVE

.. . _r.r -=---- . .._.r._--- _.

. "---..

VgSITY QUINT[T
TILT WITH ILLI'NI
ELEVEN MEN COMPRISE SQUAD
INYADINO SUCKER TER.
EsITORY
INJURIES WORK HAVOC
WITH REGULAR LINEUP
Opponeints May Land in First Nace
by Win; Fle Wolverines Play
Last Game

Obscenity Causes Suppression
Of "The Union County Clarion"'
A decision to withhold from sale the nizance of the publication yesterday
"Union County Clarion" unofficial morning when President Marion L.
newspaper of the Michigan Union Burton received numerous protests
County Fair, was reached at a meeting against its appearance on the streets.
of the board of directors of the Union, President Burton referred the subj'ect
several members of the Senate con- ject to the Union directors who met
mittee on student affairs and the fac- at 5 o'clock yesterday.
ulty advisors of the Fair committee, !The "Clarion" Which was to have
held yesterday afternoon. been sold on the campus during the
The meeting assembled in response lay to promote the success of the
to complaints which had been lodged Fair, was meanwhile withheld until
with them to the effect that the the official policy had been determin-
"Clarion" contained material unfit for ed. Following the decision of the
publication. The paper, which was meeting, the entire issue wjas burned.
of the "scandal sheet" variety depict- The "Clarion" was edited by Ray
ed in lurid terms imaginary indis- A. Billington, '25 assisted by B. G.
cretions of students and faculty mem- Baetcke, '26, 14. R. Stone, '26, Lisle
hers, and was characterized by what Rose, '25. The business manager was
-_-{L ''l'

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-1

COOLIDGE ACTION
STIRS TAX I, ST NNOEFIH

'The Day's News .At
The Capitol

. .,g_.....

UNION FAIR THRONGS, GREETED
BY ATMOSPHERE OF SAWDUST
RING AND GIDDY REVELLER!

PROPOSAL FOR 25

PER CENT

INCOME REDUCTION
OPPOSED

PARTIES FEAR DEITY
WILL PREVENT PASSAGE

Green

States That He Sees
Hope of Enactment for
Ma'chl Payments

Little

Coach Mather, Manager Wright, and a prominent University offcial ca
eleven players left at 9 o'clock last " a general atmosphere of loose
night for Urbana where they will en- and obscenity."
gage the Illinois quintet in the final University officials first took
game of the season.
The entire squad comprised the list
of men taken on the last trip. Of the
eleven men who made than journiey but IS U N 19 IN
five men will be back in school next
year, Kipke, Deng, Henderson, Mc-
Wood, Stegmeler and Kenrick all re-
ceiving their degrees in June. Cap-
tain "Hoopy" Birks, whose basketball
activities were brought to a close be-, Razzberry Fest Will Feature Idio
cause of a sprained ankle, will also cradles of Guests; to be Held
graduate 'at the end of this semester. April I
Lineup Uncertain
"Buss" McWood was' taken on the HENDERSON, WINNER OF '23
trip and will probably get into the OIL-CAN, TO PASS ON TiRO]
game at least for a short while. Billy
Fallon has McWood's knee, injured in A selected 'list of invitations,c
scrimmage Wednesday, in good shape. prising some of the foremost new
Kipke's knee is also in fair condition per men in the states of Michigan
but Skipper Mather will probably take peroenasnbthe"sateslof Mychiga
no chances with the injury, unless the Ohio, has been compiled y the
game is a close one. Kipke is one of mittee in charge of arrangements
Fisher's baseball veterans and no the annual Gridiron banquet, tc
chances will be taken to hurt his held in this city April 1, under
playing on the diamond. . auspices of Sigma Delta Chi, nati
Haggerty, Henderson and McWood
will play the forwards, Doyle will professional journalism fraternity.
handle the tip-off position and Kipke, list, according to the statement,
Deng and Kenrick will play at guard. cludes several prominent state o
Just what combination will start is als, as well as faculty men, and
only a matter of conjecture, .but it 1s proximately 90 students, who wit
certain that all these men will see chosen for their standing in stu
service at some stage of the contest. affairs.
Morgaridge and Landre may also be The Michigan Gridiron night is t
sent in as relief players. modeled after the annual affair
Set for Real Battle, every year by the Washington cha
Captain Potter and Maner will start of Sigma Delta Chi, when ther
at the forwards for the Illini. Stilt prominent journalists and wr
well will play center and Parker and from all parts of the country ga
Popken will fill the defense positions. In the capital only to be razzed
Over-confidence in the game withs cause of their faults in their pr
Northwestern has left the Illinois camp "ppion. A special committee has
and Michigan w-ill face a severe tussle appointed to decide upon the fac
tonight. Victorytonight for Illinois Men to whom. will go the honor of
+,'-Uq- ._- ging the "oil-can," an insignia w

;aed Arden Kirschner, '25, assisted by Har-
ness old Marks, 26, Lee Ensel, 26, Wilson
Graff, '26, Joseph Gandy, '26, and John
cog- I Conlin, '26.

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The
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S[gICOMTIESUBPOENAS WOOD

Declares Oil Interests

Offered to

Support Wood, Sr., for
Consideration

MRS. JOHN GORMAN AND
JAKE RAMON TO GET CALL
Washington, March 7.-Leonard
Wood was subpoened by the senate
oil committee tonight after public
hearing of a statement in which. he
declared that certain oil interests had
offered for a consideration to support
his father, Major General Leonard
Wood, for the Republican presidential
nomination in 1920.
According to the story told by Wood
the offer was made at the tiite of the
deadlock in the Chicago convention,
and was conditioned upon the ap-
pointment of the late Jake Hamon
then Republican national committee-
man from Oklahoma to the post of1
secretary of the interior.
Senator Walsh of Montana, stated
tonight that subpoenas also would be
issued for Mrs. John W. Gorman
formerly Clara Smith Hamon and Jakel
Ilamon Jr.,
''he subpoenas for Wood's appear-j
ance before the committee is return-
able Wednesday March 12. Committee
members indicated that his testimonyi
might open up an entirely new field!
of inquiry.

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Washington, D. C., March 7.-(By
A. P.)-Endorsement by President
Coolidge of the proposal to remove
the provision for a 25 per cent reduc-
tion in personal income taxes payable
this year from the revenue bill and
enact it in a joint resolution before
March 15, when first installments are
due, stirred up a new tax fight in the
house.
Republican organization leaders in-
dicated they would force action on the
proposal, while opposition developed
in the ranks of both parties.
Democrats characterized the move
as preliminary to a presidential veto
of the revenue bill itself, and many
Republicans expressed the 'fear that.
with this provision out of the bill, it
would be subject to delay in enact-
ment.
Chairman Green of the ways and
means committee where the first ac-
tion must be takenwonrsuch a resolu-
tion, delayed presenting the proposal
to thedcommittee and declared he had
there was little hope of getting it
heard so much opposition he felt
through in time for the March 15 pay-
ments.
President Coolidge supported the
argument of the treasury in asking
the action on the ground that it would
eliniinate confusion resulting from re-
funds which would be necessary if the
reduction were approved after the first
installments have been paid. Mean-
while the senate finance committee
which yesterday approved the flat re-,
duction proposal, got down to work on'
the revenue bill.

President Coolidge proclaimed an!
increase in tariff rates on wheat,
Attorney-general Daugherty return-
ed to Washington without indicating
intention of resigning.
Subpoenas were served on a number
of witnesses by the senate committee
in the Daugherty investigation.
The senate passed the Treasury and
Post Office department appropriation
bill.
Paid up insurance was agreed upon
by the house ways and means com-
mittee as a major provision in the
bonus bill.
The first test votes on Muscle
Shoals in the house showed a majority
of those voting on amendments toI
favor the Ford bid.I
Rep. Theodore E. Burton notified
the administration that he preferred
to remain in congress to being secre-
tary of the navy.
President Coolidge, it was announc-
ed, favors the proposal in congress for
a joint resolution to make effective a
25 per cent reduction in the 1923 taxes.
Representative, Langley of Ken-
tucky, and Representative Sihlman, of
Maryland, denied that they had ever
exercised influence improperly and
Mr. Langley demanded a house invest-
igation of rumors that his name was
mentioned in connection wvh th Chi-
cago grand jorv report on n"sase -(,
office.I
OF COURT F

Michigan's revived Union Fair was
ushered upon the campus yesterday
afternoon when the parade made its
appearance. Starting from the Yost
field house the procession travelled
the main streets of Ann Arbor ending
.its line of march at the field house
again Three blocks were covered by
the strange line of freaks and fantas-
tic floats contributed by the fraternit-
ies and organizations. Floats of
every description, animals of grotes-
que proportions and strange actions,
six bands and uncountable dilapidat-
ed Fords formed together to make up
the procession.
The prize that will be awarded to
the best float- in the parade will be
givenafter a meeting of the judges
can be held. They will probably de-
cide on the winner today.
Heading the line of marchers came
the members of the Fair committee on
horseback. They were followed by the
Varsity band in regular uniform and
with their hats turned backward ac-
cording to the ancient custom estab-
lished after winning a football game.
After the band the floats and other
features of the parade followed.
A cow that crossed its legs and
performed strange antics before those
watching it was one of the prominent
things in the march. A horse who
carried out the same acts was another
feature, going under the name of
"Spark Plug".
A'police patrol that broke into fra-
ternity houses and dragged forth mem-
bers to be carried away in the wagon
was another one of the strange sights
that made the parade what it was.
STUDENT IRE ROUSED
BY OLD HARVARD01BELL

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PARADE OF MOTLEY IDIOCIES, BARKING
FLOATS, AND OLD FORDS Ti!
STARTS ACTION

Varsity Band Leads Long Line
Special Features in March
Through City

of

PRIZE FOR BEST FLOAT
TO BE AWARDED TO-DAY

CROWDS GATHER ABOUT
BOOTHS TO TRY SKILL
Gaudy Circus Colors, Signs, Ciowns,
Midway aid Baloons Lend
Spirit

BALLYHOOERS BL
EIR VOICES WITH
CAROUSERS

r
I

Bennet Clahis Attorney General'
He Was Able to Attend
to Things

SadI

Foreign News
In Brief

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FIGURES TO TAKE STAND
UNDV)R OATH TO-10RRO
Washington, March 7.-TestimonyI
directly linking Attorney-general Dau-
gherty with the effort to prevent the
recalling of Edward B. McLean toI
the witness stand was given today be-
fr . nilcenmittee.

Yost field house, scene of athletic
activities for the past few months, was
transformed into a colorful circus last
night. Clowns and bands and criers
blended their efforts to produce a
bedlem of noise and an atmosphere
that was typical of a Union Fair.
More than 3,500 people crowed them-
selves into the field house for the
Fair. They wandered from booth to
booth, listened to the grotesquely
outfitted criers that bellowed the mer-
its of the freaks within the sideshows,
paused at one that attracted them, and
entered. It was a drifting crowd,
transformed into a circus following by
the atmosphere that made the field
house the bedlem that it was.
Sideshows Draw Attention
It was the sideshows that were the
most attractive things of the Fairto
the crowd, who flocked about the
criers. They went from one to anoth-
er, some in a systematic process of
taking them all in, and others just
drifting. And it was a crowd in a
circus mood, that cnuld take a fake
show in the atmosphere in which it
was meant and laugh about it 'all.
The decorations did much to change
the giant field house into the circus
that it was. Red and white canvass
hung in alternate strips about the
sides, forming the booths beneath the
balcony that surrounds the building.
The booths themselves were separated
by wooden posts on which the clown's
heads were placed.
'Posters Add Effect
The advertising that was carried,
out by the organizations with side-
shows added to the effect of the dec-
orations. Great signs and posters
decorated the fronts of the booths.
Circus pictures of freaks and wild
animals hung from the tops of the
fronts of the shows. Platforms built
about the fronts of the booths held
criers and freaks from within the
show.
At one end a motorcycle would ap-
pear on the booth in front of'the side
show. It would roar and spit smoke.
A crier would tell of the race that was
to be started within. It would vanish
into the tent. In another place a girl
would appear and do slow dancing
movements to the strains of wierd
musical instruments, while her powers
were described in vivid tones by the
announcer. Then the police patrol
would sweep by with its bell clang-
ing and carrying a few vicitms to the
"Court of Injustic."
- Roman Circus Presented
The circus was held on the dance
floor in the center of the building. A
procession entered, with the emperor
of Rome and his slaves and animals.
They went upon the floor, the emper-
or seated himself, and his slaves dis.
played their powers before him.
Boxing, a tight rope walker that thrill-
ed, jui-jitsu, saber fencing, all were
carried out, and the victims tossed to
the lions who roared in cages at one
end of the floor or saved as the em-
peror willed.
Dancing was another one of the
many attractions carried on. The
regular Union orchestra furnished
music, which was only interrupted as
the circus was in progress.
The Fair this year has been under
the upervision of John Briscoe, '24E,
as general chairman of the pommittee
in charge. It will be repeated begin-
ning at 7 o'clock tomorrow night in
th field house.

will place the Ruby five in a tie for - ._o L u
first, should Wisconsin defeat Chicago. carries with it the distinction of being London-The Daily Mail says the Ira E. Rennet, an editorial writer
Michigan will endeavor to raise her the best oil spreader. The honor last UIIU IUILIV I government has decided to abandon the on the Washington Post testified that Boston, March 7.-Right in the
position in the Big Ten race by hand- year was won by Prof. William Hend- project for a naval base at Singa- the attorney general had told him on midst of the morning's sleep that bell
Ing the Indians another defeat tonight. erson who will make the presentation pore. the day McLean was summoned to has been tolling for generations, and
The Wolverines nosed out Illinois in this. year to whoever is decided upon. Uwlmktepo i UIU IN1 Washington to tell the publisher "not now Harvard wants to end the nuis-
the first Conference game in the Yost Th entertainment is to consist of a to worry" Mr. Daugherty was quotedane. No Harvard student thinks of
field house by one point, but with the s ork, March 7.-The inter-church decided to issue five per cent bonds to as saying that he was "attending to rising at 7 o'clock, yet always the
shortosebyon skit, of a nature which is not to N ew *YorMrh7-heitrcuc
team hit by injuries Michigan will Ibe disclosed, and several epitaphs, each world movement of North America the amount of 200,000,000 francs for things." university's official bell is tolled at
have to play their best basketball to1 of which is supp~osed to depict a sore on hand of $2,548.28 acording to a electrification o irailway lines.ennet also told the committee that that hour by the official bell ringer.
pll through with a win. Point in the career of the victim. Incorporated has wound up its affairs ___ Senator Curtiss of Kansas the assis- A movement is under way to abol-
with all debts paid and a cash balance B -AM ant Republican leader in the senate, ish the bothersome tradition. The
report made publics today. This was Henning and Reinhold Wulle probab- was the man mentioned as the prin- bell ringer, Arthur Conant, admits he
made possible, it was announced ly won't engageDr.CarCraemer in cipal" in one of the telegrams sent to sees neither rime nor reason to getting
through the gift of $1,403d00 by Dr. McLean at Palm Beach. Later Sen- up in the cold gray dawn to awaken
John D. Rockerfeller Jr. and the re- challenge to a dueler,answeringwouldhbe ator Curtis issued a -statement how- hundreds who curse and turn over,
demption of subscription pledged by willng topatdtecs hatwonbever contradicting several points in and the students have voiced their pro-
Uepthousands of small contributors. willing to 'epe-at the chages that von that story, and declaring he had had tests to being aroused in their official!
VLPoGraefe was a traitor outsidethe no communication with the McLean paper, the "Crimson." They want the!
Reicsta andthe th later oui agents which would make it possibleI bell to ring at 8 or 8:30, if it must
Orlando, Florida, March 7.-Pat Leaders of the 'Campaign Sales Cariies O "Act sue for libel if he desired. .kipsbe to refer to hima as the fprini sound at all.i
Moran, manager of the Cincinnati reds, Force" teams of the Ann Arbor chain- . for them toreer t a the in sound t all.
died here at 6:07 o'clock tonight of her of commerce met yesterday at a C c ling Grief.London-ewer babies are born i cipal" in any other way than his own " t ever was desirable or tees
GratBitimbte.pe r i naeary to arise at 7 o'clock, that time,
Brights disease. He died fighting his luncheon to complete the rosters of Great Britain but people are living Tomorrow the Kansas senator will like the days of the one-hdrse shays
last grim battle with the same determ- the various teams. Harry Nichols is' A telegram telling of the death of longer than formerly, so the popula- take the witness stand to make his i and tallow candles, has fled," says the
ination he showed on the baseball dia- colonel i charge, assisted by five her 10-ear old daughter was delivered tion problem remains. Last year the I denial under oath. Bennett then will student paper. "The nuisance is a
mond. majors and twenty-five captains. just before the opening of the cur- birth rate was 19.7 a thousand, a low
Mrs. Moran and their two children, The object of the campaign, which fain Thursday night, to Margaret record, and the death rate was 11.6' explanation. In his testimony today ----
hurriedly summoned to his bedside will open Tuesday morning, is to se- Wood specialty dancer of the "Wild- also a low record. There were 158 the witness insisted that the reference
from Cincinnati arrived a few hours cure enough new members and service flower" company which played at the 386 births and 444,869 deaths in Eng- to the "principal" does not relate to_
before his death but Moran had lapsed fund pledges in order to insure a mini- Whitney theater. In spite of this fact land and Wales. The marriage rate. geas suggested by some ITY TO
into unconsciousness and was unable mum income to the organization of' Miss Wood not only went on wih t was 15.2. Peso e t
recogize hemode didtinnisy$4,000annully.th the ;democratic senators and it was an- j FUT11Hn
to recognise them, He died In his $14,000 annually. performance but her clever noveltyE nounced at the White house that Mr. FUTUR
wife's arms. An only brother, Ton |I| dances with Jack Dempsey proved to Naples-Several mnn charg'd with Coolidge did not recall any conference
Moran of Fitchburg is enroute here. Cornell TP aHale Few E Grades be one of the brightest spots in the havig wge I false A' erican ss- wit Bennett since the oil issue be-
Moran'sofhealthrbegtnstosfail duringjwIthacanN.tYsincam'che7.-ThesCornell
Moran's health began to fail during Ithaca, N. Y., March T-The Cornell show and the one most favorably re- ports were arrested. They were came acute. , Contradiction of the proposed taxi
the winter, but he came out with the arts college has adopted a new policy ceived. She was called back time and charged with selling passports to rates which were published in The
Reds in spite of his illness. " On Mon- regarding marks. This policy practic- time again, but gave no response to peasants for 2,000 to 5,000 lire. Daily yesterday morning was made at
day the break came and he was taken ally means that the "E" grade no the repeated demands for encores. rs Sr tal yeterday morkn x. mde at
I i { r iy S o e the office of City Clerk I. G. Reynolds
to a hospital where it was believed longer exists. The final grade is It is seldom in the theatrical world Port of Spain, Trinidad-A a Ameri- yesterday afternoon. Mr. Renolds
his condition was not serious. either a pass or a failure and that it that a wire received immediately pre- can naval squadron, the Savannah, In M .A.C. M eet stated that the ordinance would be
is worthless to take a condition exam- ceding a performance is delivered to Bushnell, Beaver, Camden, Ortoam discussed and probably revised before
an actor until his or her part in the and 24 submarines under Admiral it had a public hearing at a future i
nia's 1924 University "Labor Day" was production is over for the night. Miss Taylor, are here for a several days Special to the Daly date which has not yet been decided
brought to a memorable close by the Florida to Have New Library Building1 Woods deserves commendation for her visit. Numerous social functions and Lansing, Mich., March 7.-Michigan upon,
Big "C" Sirkus. Approximately) Gainesville, Fla., March 7.-The skillful acting, as well as for her sports events have been arranged. took two first in the M. A. C. meet The ordinance sets the rate at 30
7,000 persons attended. State Board of Control met here re- lancing. Not one member of the dis- here last night and scored in other cents for the first third of a mile, and
cently to receive and consider bids appointed audience understood her Stockholm - Sweden's conference events. Whitman and Higgins, sprint- ten cents thereafter for each addition-
Attend the Fair Tonight for the first unit of the proposed four- reasons for refusing their requests for with Finland, Denmark and Norway ers, each breasted the tape at the head al third of a mile or fraction thereof,,
-W----_______ unit library building for the Univer-, "More!" so cleverly did she play her has adopted a plan for conciliation of of their respective fields, the 50 and 40t
sit.ehesueor$5000 hsieedosthirrepetieaieds heer nd 25 ents 'for each additional passenger
S Osity. The sum of $250,000 has been part of the gay, carefree dancer. international disputes through the yard dashes. for the trip, and ten cents for each
WJOUOEYN FROM AFRICA appropriated by the state for the build- Miss Woods will leave the company League of Nations. The plan proposes Rhoades placed second in the pole wait of three minutes or fraction
TO WATCISO_ _GRADUATEing-'tonight to return to her mother's home presentation to a permanent concilia- vault, Aubrey took second in the high I thereof.
in New York city for the funeral. tion council such questions which can hurdles and fourth in the low hurdles, The ordinance regulating and licen-
Johannesburg, British South 1tinesota Celebrates 70th -'Birthday _ _not be settled displomatically. and McCain took second in the high sing taxicabs is the result of a joint
Africa, to Ann Arbor-this seems Minneapolis, March 7.-During the -- - jump. The Wolverines finished sec- meeting o fthe ordinance committee
to be the longest distance to be formative period of the state of Min- NOTED INN REOPENS Manchester-The Federation of Cot- ond in the two mile special relay and representatives from the various
_ . .. . . _ _ , ..-'. _ . - -. . _ _ __ t ,_ ., ... « + .. +'+ . 't ..: . . . . ~ . . n0 " --L a __ __ _ _ t t--'.

I lilportant Document Rescued
Cambridge, Mass., March 7.-Har-
vard recently rescued from the scrap
heap an important document of con-
temporaneous history in the form of a
diary written by a British officer dur-
ing the seige of Boston in 1775. The
document has been lost for a century
in the library of a Connecticut family.
Attend the Fair Tonight

f

I

POINCAIRE CHALLENGES f
DEPUTY MEMBER TO DUEL
Paris, March 7.-(By A. P.)--
Premier Poincaire today chal-
lenged Deputy De Launay to a J

travelled to the 1924 commence- nesota the outstanding landmark is- ton Spinners has given notice that un-
mnent exercises. The journey, by ! the founding of the state university. Sudbury, Mass., March 7.-Wayside less a strike in a small mill at Royton}
?way of England, is being made On November 26, 1851 the university Inn, in South Sudbury, made famous is terminated in seven days, the en-,
I by the mother of Mentagu Leve- opened with 40 students and one pro- I by the poems of Longfellow, has been gagements of 150,000 operatives in the

event, with Cochran running best for i
the Maize and Blue runners.
Discover Sightless Frogs j

companis held recently.
Students Retire From Cast
Chicago, March 7.-William Kerri

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