100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 25, 1922 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I,

:PECTS TEAM AS STRONG
V YEAR; PURDUE HOPE-
WITH GREEN SQUAD
NSIN' PROSPECTS
k; 5 VETS RETURN

-n Chinces Impaired
; Purple Planning for
ture Campaigns

By

Ndte: The Daily has made special
arrangements to receive accurate
weekly reports from other Big Ten
athletic camps during the season for
each of the major sports. The re-
ports here are the first of a series!
that will be included in this service.
PURDUE
Lafayette, Ind., Sept. 24.-Confer-
ence circles this year may look for a
greatly, improved showing from the
Purdue eleven if the material on hand
approaches expectations. The Boil-
ermakers' great weakness in the past,
the 'line, promises remarkable im-
proveienht dtiing the coming season,
and with a squad of 70 men on the:
turf daily, Coach Phelan is confident
that his charges will offer a goodly!
amount of opposition to opposing
elevens.
Those linemen who stand out at the
present time as most assured ot serious
consideratio'n for places are Green,:
Geiger; Swank, Kerr, and Claypool of
last year's Varsity, and Fleischmann,
Claypool, and Preshaw of the 1921
freshman squad, while in the back-
field there i-e such powerful men as
Captain Murphy, Eversman, Landis,
Worth, and Maddox for halves, Well-
man and McKenzie for full backs, and
Abramson and Barth leading thel
quarterback candidates,
WISCONSIN.
Madison, Wis., Sept. 24.-With six
experienced men all set for the sea-
son and with three who are already
looked upon as finds the University
of Wisconsin football eleven is swing-
ing into what may prove to be its mostI
successful year in many.
The declaration that Quarterback
Barr is eligible adds his name to the
veteran list which includes Captain
Williams, Tebell, Christiansen, Gib-
son, and Hohlfeld, while with Pulaski
at end and' Murray at half, two of the
newcomers to the squad, there seems
every reason to believe that the Car-
dinal aggregation will be one to be
feated by the remainder' of the Big
Ten. Below, a lineman, is another
who gives great promise, and the
Badger camp is wearing an optimistic
grin. The one casuality thus far is
-v slight injury to Hume, and it is Ilot
expected that he will be kept long
fromu practice.
The problem of filling Sundt's place
at fullback seems to be solved by thu
appear'ance of Taft, a player of great
promise. All in .all the Wisconsin
squad is one of great promise and .fol-
lowers of the Cardinal are looking for
a banner year.
IOWA
Iowa City, Ia., Sept. 24.-Confid-
ence is strong in Iowa City today as
a result of the splendid showing of
ttie University of Iowa football team
during the opening days of practice.
With the biggest squad that has ever
turned out for practice in the history
of the school the Conference cham-
pions are looking toward a possible

* uflu.tSSUf a ycl a v *ikj ~. - -y
veterans including Gordon Locke, the
great star of the 1921 aggregation ,
have returned, while theloss of such
men as Aubrey Devine and Slater is
expected to be counterbalanced by the
appearance of others equally great.
Parkin, 1921 freshman quarter, is
piloting the first team in fine shape,
while in the line is Engeldenger, let-
ter winner from West Point' At right
end a star has been uncovered in
Hancock, 190 pound sophomore, and
Iowans expect him to be the equal of
any wing man in Conference circles.
Iowa expects a great year and is un-
dismayed by reports emanating from
rival camps. It will be a great blow
to the Hawkeyes if this season does
not duplicate 1921.
MINNEAPOLIS
Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 24. -
Football prospects at the University
of Minnesota, which at the opening
of practice a few days ago were poor,
have become worse with the an-
nouncement of the ineligibility of Os-
ter, Olson, and McCreery, three of'
the six veterans whom Coach Bill
Spaulding counted as a neucleus for
his 1922 Gopher Varsity. The unex-
pected loss of these men leave~s only
Captain Aas at center, Gilstead at
fullback and Martineau at half as a
foundation for Minnesota's eleven.
Thus, with but two veteran backs
and- one exeperienced lineman Coach
Spaulding is finding himself hard put
to create an aggregation that will
rival the more'seasoned elevens of the
Big Ten. At the ends Coach Spauld-
ing is using Ray Eckland and Carl
Schjolt. The former has had a con-
siderable amount of experience at Val-
paraiso, and seems to be the find of
the season.
The one great fault which Spauld.
ing will have to combat in his 70 can-
didates is inexperience, but with the
help of a strong staff of assistants.
recently augmented by the arrival of
Paul Redloudon, formerly assistant
coach at .Dartmouth, the Gopher men-
tor hopes to turn out an eleven that
will, at least, surpass the team that
carried the Minnesota colors in 1921.
With a seven game schedule ahead of
them, opening against North Dakota
on Oct. 7 and followed by six Big Ten
colleges, Indiiana, Northwestern, Ohioi
State, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Michigan,I
in the order named, the Gophers face
one of the hardest seasons in their
history, and every effort is being made
to whip the Minnesota squad into
shape before the whistle blows for the

WOLRINES FEATURE i
AG9IE GRID SCHEDUE
NOTRE DAME DROPPED; NO OTH.
ER ATTRACTIVE GAMES
ON CARDt
(By Associated Press)
East Lansing, Sept. 24.-Michiganc
Aggies open their football schedulo
Sept. 30, playing Alma at East Lans-
ing. The big game of the season,
with the University of Michigan, will
be played at Ann Arbor, Nov. 4, later l
in the season than usual.
The 1922 schedule is not particularly
attractive, although several games
that should furnish good contests arer,
on the bill. The loss of Notre Dame
from the schedule probably will be
most keenly felt by Aggie supporters,
as Notre Dame always has vied with
Michigan for the feature place on the1
Farmer program.
The schedule follows:
Sept. 30-Alma at East Lausing. }
Oct. 7-Albion at East Lansing.
Oct. 21-University of South Dako-
ta at East Lansing.
Oct. 28 - Indiana University at
Bloomington.
Nov. 4-Michigan at Ann Arbor.
Nov. 11-Ohio Wesleyan at East
Lansing..f
Nov. 18-Crieghton University at
Omaha.
Nov. 25.-Massachusetts Aggies atj
East Lansing.
Nov. 30-St. Louis University at St.
Louis. '

Rates Wesbrook
Sevenh Best'
Walter Wesbrook, '22, who coached
the Varsity tennis team last year and
was the Wolverine star for three
years before that, has completed a re-
markably successful summer on the
courts of the country, east and west.
At a recent meeting of a committee
of the United States Lawn Tennis as-
sociation, Wesbrook was rated as sev-
enth among the players who com-
peted in the intercollegiate event this
summer. Because of the unusual
caliber of the men who competed, this
rating is more of an honor than it
would appear on the surface.
Loses to Tildeni
Perhaps the most interesting tour-
ney that Wesbrook played in was the
national'clay court event that was
held at Indianapolis. Here he reached
the semi-finals, where he was only
defeated by the world's 4champion,
William Tilden. Although big Bill
won in straight sets Walter gave him
a tough fight every inch, of the way.
In the Intercollegiate tourney Wes-
brook was defeated in the semi-finals
by Ray Brown, who was rated as sec-
ond, in a hard fought match, the score
being 4-6 6-1 6-4. Brown was defeat-
ed in the finals by Williams, of Yale,
who was rated first.
Wins Stato Title
Among his other tournaments Wes-
brook competed at Chicago early in
the summer where he surprised every-
one and copped the Serwood tourna-
ment by defeating Walter Hayes, na-
tional clay count champion. Besides
this he easily won the Michigan State
tournament at Muskegon, which he

MICHIGAN GOLFEHAM
WINS AGAINST STRONG OPPOSI-
TION AT DETROIT DURING
SUMMER
Carlton S. Wells, of the rhetoric de-
partment, won the Michigan amateur
golf championship, July 22 at the
Lockmar Country Club, Detroit, de-
feating Arthur V. Lee, Jr., Detroit
Golf club, 9 Mup and 8 to play. In the
morning round Wells turned in -an -Ap-
proximate .70, which° would be a
course record but for the fact that.
several puts were not played out.
Lee was probably off his game in
the morning, while Wells was travel-
ling at a swift pace. The margin of
eight holes in Wells' favor at noon was
the result.
Well's victory was the more re-
markable because of the fact that he
was virtually unheard of outside his
home club until last year, when he
went to Lockmor for the Michigan
event. Following his defeat in the
first round preceding the semi-finals
of that tournament, Wells began pre-
paring himself for this tournament
and went determined to win. And he
did, over as strong a field as has ever
partiepated in the event.
Wells played his usual game in the
afternoon and Lee kept up with him
from then until the wind up on the
tenth. However, the Detroiter could
not make up his morning losses al-
though he did win two holes to three
by Wells. Wells played the same
game as he had played on the previous
days. He was wild from the tees, with
13 drives in the rough during the day,
but that did not bother him because
with the absence of trees he had a
clear way ahead to the greens. His
powerful iron recoveries did the rest.
On the green he displayed wonderful
form with the putter, making one put
of 45 feet.

IV#

£

L

TRY OUR NOON SPECIALS
PHONE ORDERS DELIVERED
Phone 699-J 603 E. University AN
OPEN FRO)I 7:00 A. M. TO 11:00 P. M.
Open after Friday and Saturdsy Nighi t Dances
I1 f1 tlllltllt1i1ii[Ifil D O AlluIIIIII1fI1miL1 111111111111 3Dllillliilllllllili
DO A ol"DO

NEW ADDRESS
227 South State

Nuf Sed!

F4

MACK WINS WORLD
SERIES THREE TIMES
New York, Sept. 24.-Baseball's an-
nual classic, the world series, is just
in the offing.
The fan begins his speculations. For
the sake of argument he turns back
to series of other years.
What manager has had greatest suc-
cess in world series?
And the answer comes - Connie
Mack, christened Cornelius *MacGilli-
cuddy-of the Philadelphia Athletics.
Mack has carried three bf his Phila-
delphia teams to world champion-
ships. Twice he met and defeated
John -McGraw and his Giants. In the
other series Mack triumphed over
Frank Chance, the great Cub leader.
McGraw triumphed over Mack in
190g.
Chance won two world series with
the Cubs; Carrigan won two with the
Boston Red Sox and McGraw has
taken two with the Giants.
Grand Rapids to Have Motor Club
Grand Rapids, Sept. 24.-First steps
in the permanent organization of a
motor club have been taken here re-
cently with adoption of a constitution
and by-laws. Twelve directors are to
be chosen at the next meeting. Tem-
porary officers also will be elected.
Rider, the pen specialist.-Adv.

has won several times in the
he has the Detroit city title.

past, as

WIAIS GOING ON

I

opening game.
NORTHWESTERN
Evanston, Ill., Sept. 24.-Gloom has
invaded tho Northwestern .6amp foi.
,lowing injuries to Mills, veteran
guard, and Wienecke, star Purple
quarter, that may keep both men out,
of the game for the remainder of the
season. However, with 60 min hard
at it daily Coach Thistlewaite is not
altogether morose.
Captain Paterson has been a sen-
sation during the first week of prac-,
tice, and the daily trips of motor cars
between Evanston and the downtown{
departments of the Uniirersity have
brought out powerful fife7from Chi-
cago that have; heretof wre, been un-
able to appear for pract ce.
Thistlewaite has no great hopes for
the coming year, owing to the fact
that his men are practically all some-
what inexperienced seniors, but with
six star freshmen lured from the con-
fines of Oak Park high school, the
Purple leader is looking forward opti-
mistically to the years to come. It
is believed certain, nevertheles, that
the team representing the Evanstoni-
ans this year will be the strongest
that has defended the Purple in many
a day, and that the showing of the
Northwestern eleven will be such as
to bring home an unparalleled degree
of fame.

3 1 N I)AY
7 :31)~Openinostudent assembly In
Hill auditorium. President Burton
speaks.
WED)NESDAY
7:00-Wayfarer's club meets in room
302 of the Union.
7:30-Student council meeting at the
Union.
THURSDAY
7:30--A dniral Plunkett speaks at En.
gineering society smoker in Union
assembly hall.
A free trip will be given to the Mich-
igan-Minnesota game by the Arcade
Barber Shop.-Adv.
LAB. COATS
SoNaGen&COMPAHY
-fo- men- - - - - n- - - K -

For safety and best results, place
your savings with the Huron Valley
l3iuiiding and Savings Association.
This Association has never paid less
than 6 per cent dividends, exempt from
U. S. income tax and all state and
nunicipal taxes. Moneys can be with-
irawn any time. Investments mature
_n six and a half years. Wm. L. Walz,
President; H. H. Herbst, Secretary.
nit Arbor Savings Bank Bldg-Adv.
Drawing instruments-bargains in
second-hand sets. Wahr's University
Bookstore.-Adv.
Ask a user: he will tell you Rider's
Masterpen" is the best.-Adv.
For Pens and Good Repairing

RIDER

THE PEN SPECIALIST

808 S. State St

I

4

-I

MUSIC!

MUSIC!'

clothes as

best

COLUMN CLASSI F IE COLMN
CLOSES CLOSES
At 3 P. ADVERTISING AT 3 P.M,
MICHIGAN DAILY
Classified Rates. Two Cents per word a day, paid in advance. ,Min-
ismum charge for first .day, .25c. Minimum thereafter, 20c. fhree
cents per word per day if charged. White space charged for at rate
of 5c per agate line. Classified, charged only to those having phones.
Liner Rates: Twelve cents per line, without contract, paid in advance,
PHONE 960

become a gentleman
-by Hickey-free man

You will want Music, Good Music,
and lots of it during your college ca-
reer. Good dependable Instruments
are necessary toget best results.
Get acquainted with us and our
fine line of All Musical Instruments,
Sheet Music and study material for
students of music.

WAGER&COMPANY
Jor Tiencc-J9LS fce J4g

f

~, .

I

WANTED
WANTDD-Some one to read"about
two hours a. day. The reading will
be mainly in Shakespeare and Shake-
speare criticism. Only persons spe-
cializing in English or Comparative
Literature need apply. For further
particulars, call 243-J from 2:00 .to
5:00, Monday and Tuesday. Calls
will be answered only at specified
tiie. 1-2
WANTED-Student to train this year
for a managership next year; must
have mechanical, sales,.and execu-
tive ability. Inquire with references,
after Oct. 10. Rider's Pen Shop. 1-21
WANTED-Representative to handle
magazine subscriptions in this terri-
tory. Publishers' Subscription Serv-
ice, Jackson, Mich.

FOUND
FOU NDP-A fountain pen thatdreally
meets student needs. Holds 230
drops of ink and is a self-starter.
Rider's Pen Shop. 1-21
FOUND-A purse. See Walt Scherer,
at The Daily.
LOST
LOST-My pen troubles, at Rider's, of
course. 1-21
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Rider's No. 77 Master-
pens. Real pens for students. 1-21
MISCELLANEOUS
E. NORMANTON BILBIE, teacher of
violin, piano, and harmony. Studio,
307 N. Main St. Tel: 611-M. 1-30
YOUR NAME embossed in gold leaf on
your fountain pen. Free, on pens pur-
chased at our shop. Rider's Pen
Shop. 1-21
RIDER'S PEN SHOP, 308 S. State., is
open for business. They will have
a large line of standard makes in
self-filling pens, Rider "Master-
pens," Eversharp and Conklin pen-
cils. Good fountain pen ink. Will
give you 24-hour repair service.

UPRIGHT, BABY GRAND AND PLAYER PIANOS
-- -- -- AGENCY FOR -
PAUL Go. MEHLI&SONS
HENRY F. MILLER
Jo& C FISCHER
JANSSEN, SCHILLER AND GULBRANSEN
Genuine Victor Victrolas, all sizes and
styles from $25.00 up.
A complete stock of Red Seal and Pop-
ular Victor Records. Up-to-the-mm-
ute record service, comfortable booths
for your use.
All stringed instruments from Violins
to Ukuleles.
Complete outfitters for Trap Drum-
mers: Leedy and Ludwig Instruments.
WE REPAIR ALL MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

m

FOR RENT

WORK GUARANTEED

FOR RENT-Good, large, airy rooms,
well heated; best of location; for
two boys; $7; three suites. Mrs.
Ada Jones, 1517 Wells. 2329-W. 1
FOR RENT-Seven large double rooms
for students; reasoniable'prices. 114

PIANOS FOR RENT

The BLACKSTONE, a HICKEY -FREE-
MAN four-button coat with short lapels
and straight hanging back. The HOL-
BORN is, a similar three-button model,

Schaeberlo & Son Music

III

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan