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October 01, 1922 - Image 17

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-01

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ection
Two

A61
ASO ct n

xi
l

Two

VOL. XXXIII. No ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1922

PRICE FIVE GEN

UIo

BR OAS

DRAMATIC

FIEL

gRAMATIC TOURNEY
TO BE NTIATED
BY UNION THEATER
TROPHIY TO BE AWARDED WIN-
NER IN CONTEST OPEN TO
STUDENTS
UNIQUE IDEA TO ASSIST
IN PLAY PRODUCTION
Vaudeville, Burlesque, Music, Dancing
To De Used in Newest
Trials
A dlramatic tournament including
vaudevile acts, one act plays, both
serious and satirical, whinisical mat-
ter, and matter that is outright trav-
esty or burlesque -ad pantomime
music and dancing, will be held for
the first time at the University under
the auspices of the Mimes repertoire
company. The tryouts will be held at
the Mimes theatre as soon as possible.
The idea of a dramatic tournament
seems to be one of the most plausi-
ble and commendable ideas which has
come out from any of the few schools
which are sponsoring dramatics and
are making it a vital part of the Uni-
versity life. According to the idea
which Mimes has brought out, every
one attending the University who 'is
dramatically inclined will be urged
to enter the tournament the first
round of which is to be held very
shortly.,.
To Encourage Dramatics
It is pointed out by those in charge
of the tournament that there is much
in the way of help to nearly all those
who try out, as the Mimes repertoire
company is to put on several plays
this year in the Mimes theatre which
will require a large number of actors.
It is also pointed out that by work
of this kind eligibility to Mimes dra-
matic society may be had.
The primary purpose of the idea
is for'the encouragement of dramatic
work at the University. It is to be
remembered that but there or four
regular universities, not especially
dramatic, have the facilities for real
dramatic training. Among these are
the University of California which has
a magnificent Greek open air theatre;
but it is also to be remembered that
this theatre is not used for the pro-
duction of popular plays, or vaude-
ville acts such as the Mimes is spon-
soring. The University of North Caro-
lina presents what is known as "Folk
Plays" written by students, played by
students, and directed by students.
Nowhere it seems are the popular
plays and vaudevile acts played un-
der the eye of a practical trained di-
rector such as here.
Acts to be presnted
Circulars containing information
concerning the tournament will be
sent out very soon by the comniittee
in charge of the work. The winners
of the contest will probably present
their act before a Mimes audience in
November.
The loving cup which will soon be
onddisplay in the lobby of the Union
and on which the name of every mem-
ber of the winning team will be en-'
graved-with a description of the act
he played in, will be doated by the
Union. Any team who wins the tour-
ney for -three consecutive years will
be awarded the cup. . No member of
-Mimes is eligible to enter the tourna-
ment. The acts which remain in the
contest until the final round may be
used in the dramatis work at the
Mimes theatre.
Candidates who intend to try out
are asked to register from 3 to 5
o'clock In the afternoon next week at
the office of Mr. Shuter, Mimes' direc-
tor, in the Mimes tbeatre building.

I A Step for Students
In sponsoring the institution of a

M ES AFFIATES
WITH NOTED 4SERI
THROUGH SHUTE
STEP WILL UNITE SOCIETY
DRAMA HERE WITII PROM-
INENT WRITE RS

ENTERPRISE TO FC
ALL LITER ARY E

dramatic tournament, it is wise to re-
member that Mimes has taken a step
solely for the benefit of Michigan men
and it is theirs to realize the high
privijege that has been pface before
them, points out the committee.
Arthur J. Holden, '24, is chairman
of the committee, while C. J. Dresbach,
'24, and James Johnson, '23, are as-
sociate members of the committee.
MEMBERS FINISHED

. 4

Recording
of All

Committee Lists Activities
1-fembers Taking Part
in Affhirs

TEMPORARY STUDENTS' DIREC.
TORY' AVAiLABLE IN LOBBY
Registration for membership in the
Union for 1922-23 ended yesterday
with a, total of approximately 3,600
men signed up for the full privileges
of the Union during this school year.
H. T. Cavanaugh, '24, is chairman of
the registration committee.
The committee on a temporary Stu-
dents' Directory, in the lobby of the
Union, of which E. C. Maeder, '24, is
chairman, will act until the official
Students' Directory has been printed.
The recording conmittee has duties
among which are the task of keeping
a scrap book of all clippings concern-
ing the Union and a Union activity file
which gives the graded records of all
those who serve on Union committees',
and the names of the committees on
which they serve. Througl this file
the exact record of the activity of ev-
ery man who is running for a Union
office may be known.
J. M. Purge, '23, is the recording
secretary for the Union, and head of
the recording department. .. Maeder
and Cavanaugh are assistants to the
general chairman of the department,
while the recorders are: D. M. Bram-
,ble, '25, Hubert l3radburn, '25, K. B.
Robertson, '25E, A. H. Mac Donald,
'25, R. S. Ecribner, '25E, and C. *D.
Livingston, '25. The recording de-
partment will remain open from 4 to
6 o'clock every afternoon, except Sat-
urday and Sunday afternoons. The
office of the department is in the main
offices on the third floor.
OPERA9 COSTUMES IRE
UNIQUE; SAYS SHUTER
Plans for the 1923 Union Opera are
now much advanced over those at this
time last fall, according to E. Morti-
mer Shuter, director of. Mimes and
Union Opera. It was generally
thought by some last year that no im-
provements could be made on the cos-
tumes used in the last Opera, but the
costumes for this year, the plates of
which are already here, are actually
superior to any ever used. Radium
cloth is being used" for many of the
costumes which the Opera will use in
I the coming year.

(Upner left) The ball room of the Union in which President Barton will welcomno
the yearlings Wednesday evening at the reception which will be held for them by the
Fall Reception committee; (upper center) Director 'E. Mortimer Shuter; Opera and
Mimes director, whose initiative and ability have, to a large extent made possible; the
unusual operas an'd the existence of the Mimes theatre; (upper right) The. tap room
where the University Glee clubs plan to hold several entertainments for. the students;
(below) Director Shuter directing a group of Opera workers.
ARE YOU A SUPPOR TER OF YOUR OWN INSTITUTION?
The Michigan Union was founded by alumni and students of Michigan, and is conducted by them solely
to serve the men of this University. Despite that fundamental reason for its existence, not a few students
at Michigan seem to have forgotten that the Union is peculiarly their own. institution.
What the Union means to the University has many times been repeated. Not only is it a building
wherein the men can find every convenience and advantage of the most modern club; but itfis also a living,
throbbing power, the heart of all extra-curricular student activities and pursuits. The officers of the organ-
ization are elected by popular campus vote, while the board of directors is composed mainly of student
and alumni members, and the general manager is also an alumnu ,. With-this representation in the affairs
of the Union, it is obviolis that the student body will always receive first consideratioi, with the pursuit of
its welfare the logical object of those in power.
The Union provides also a place where all students may meet on equal terms, and thus further the
democratic spirit of the University which might other wise be threatened by its i nwieldy size. An-hour of
leisure may be spent in its reading room, where may be found a wide variety of contemporary periodicals.,
Entertainment is offered in its Pilliard room or bowling alleys, with refreshment and contact with other
students provided in the genial atmosphere of its tap room. The weighty affairs of the campus are dis-
cussed in its meeting rooms; and in its ball rooms those same affairs are temporarily set aside.
Many students, however, fail to avail themselves of the opportunities and. advantages afforded by this
nationally-renowned organization, and not a' few of these express openly, the belief that the Union is too
high in its prices, and unworthy of student patronage. ' Perhaps the prices are slightly higher in the tap
room than in crude counter lunch roms found about the campus. The same individuals who make this
complaint willingly pay in their own towns two or three times more than their food is worth for the privilege
of eating it in a hotel dining room rather than in a dairy lunch. At hony they are willing to pay for service.
But with their own organization it is a different matter. They fail to consider that t'he Michigan Union
is an immense institution, with comparatively, few money making departments, and the remaining ones a
constant drain upon its finances, carried only for. theaccommodation of the student members.. Consequently,
the revenue, from such branches as the restaurant is not an excess profit which disappears somewhere into.
a sinking fund, but finds its way immeiately into the general coffers to help balance up the losses sus-
tained in some other less self-supporting but equally necessary department..
The Michigan Union has been considered worthy enough by other universities to 'furnish the model for
like institutions in their own localities. If the men of Michigan would only consider collectively the ad-
vantages which .that organization affords them as set againit the trifling sums which they pay in return,
the Michigan Union would soon have the patronage aad support of every thinking man in the University
today.

get reports of the freshmen and ad-
visers' concerning the success of the
upperclassmen in their responsibility1
to the yearlings.t
The members qf the committee are:I
J. . 'Duffy, '24, general chairman,'
C. C. Chapple, '24, and.R. V. Rice,''23,
chairmen, and C. W. Merriam, '25, A.
B. Connable, '25, Leo Franklin, '24,
F. R. ;Smith, '25, R. L. Leopold, '25,
E. A. Kimischner, '25, 14. B. Coates, '25,E
and D. M. Martin, '25, assistant chair-E
men.
Freshman to Hear President :it Annualt
Fall.Reception held by
Union
UNDERWOOD 'AND' DUFFY TO
ADDRESS FIRST YEAR MEN
Piesident Marion L. Burton will de-
liver the speech of welcome to the '
freshmen of the University at the re-
ception 'Which the fall Reception com-t
mittee shall hold for them Wednes-1
day,. Oct-, 4, in the Union assembly
hall. President Burton' may speak
upoi ''the freshman's relation to the
University.
Thomas I. Underwood, '23L, presi-'
dent "of'the Union, will speak to the
new men on their relationship with
the Union, while James C. Duffy, '24,
chairnian of the Upperclass Advisory
committee, will speak to them as rep-
resentative of his committee.
This is the first opportunity this fall
for the freshmen to meet President
Burton and to get together with their
fellow classmen. This reception is an
annual-affair.
Refreshments will be free, and Paul
Wilson's orchestra will furnish thel
music for the occasion. The varsity
cheer leader will be present to lead
the yells and to arouse pep among
the yearlings.aMore than 500 attended
the meeting 'last fall.
LYCHWILL ARANGE
O.3U TRAIN VENYICE
Thomas Lynch, '26L, has been
named by the Union as head of the
committee to make arrangements tfor
train service to the OhionState gameI
on Oct. 21. Lynch will meet with the
members of the Athletic association
and railroad officials early next week
to talk over the nimber of trains nec-
ess.ary tc make final arrangements for
rates.
It is estimated that there will be
more than 5,000 students going to Co-I
lumbus this year by train, in addition
to the number going by automobile.
The committee in charge, however,
feels sure that there will be ample
room t5 accommodate all.

Eminent Authors Will Exhort Student
in University to Write "As
He Feels
Mimes of the University of Mich-
igan Union through their director,
E. 'Mortimer Shuter, have affiliated
themselves in the play writin* field
with a concern in New York City
'known as "The '49e s" which in-
cludes, for example such unusual
writers for the theatre as Heywood
Brown, Franklin P. Adams, Robert C.
Benchley, Dorothy Parker, George
Ade, Booth Tarkington, Arthur H.
Samuels, Ehlgene O'Neill, Montague
Glass, Bertram Block, Lewis . Gens-
ier, Deems Taylor, Harry Leon Wil-
son.
The '49ers, as -those interested in
:bho project are calling themselves
tentatively, intend to present a mis-
cellaneous, kaleidoscopic intertain-
ment of sketches, small ballets, songs,
pantomimes, etc. They will adhere
to no set program and follow no
forms. They do want youth and in-
telligence, however.
Encourage Young Writer
Youth, indeed is the main ele-
ment that The '49ers want to bring'
forth. For years the young and un-
recognized writer for the theatre has
complained that producers have com-
pelled him to bet his ideas and is
material into conventional form be-
fore they would produce it. Any one
may bring a fresh idea to The '49ers
through the Mimes without any fear
that such a thing xvil hapea to hi.
His idea may be rejected but he will
never be asked to compromise.
The '49ers find It extremely dif-
ficult to specify exactly what they do
want from writers. They want seri-
ous matter, satiric matter, whimsical
matter--matter that is outright trav-
esty or burlesque, If It has intelligent
sophistication behind it. They want
as much novelty as they can find.
Want Ideas for Daees
Ideas for dances, for misc, for any
of the elements contributing to their
theatre, The '49ers will welcome with
avidity. One act plays they are not
seeking especially and conventional
one act plays, no matter how good,
they do not seek at al.
tAnothertdefiniteathing The '49ers
know is that they want, In every way
possible, to encourage young writers
to write as they feel. No eact royal-
ty scales have been decided upon, but
those who submit material may be
assured that moderate eekly royal-
ties will be paid. The management
wishes to pay all that it can afford
and it wants, also, to give the authors
a participation in the profits of the
enterprise. To this end a percentage
(to be determined) of the profits'will
be set aside for division among the
authors at the end of the season or
when a certain rogram is withdrawn.
The proportions for this division are
yet to be worked out. Naturally those
who contribute in the greatest degree
will receive the largest shares.
Manuscripts to Shuter
Manuscripts, ideas, etc., - should be
sent to The Mimes of the University
of Michigan Union, Mimes Theatre,
and marked "Attention of E. Mortl-
mer Shuter," who will see that they
receive proper attention at the hands
of "The 49ers." Intending writers
may consult Mr. Shuter from 10 to 5
(Continued on Page Ten)

Financial Questions At Union
Explained By Study Of Accounts

ROOMIN COMMITTEE'S
TASK IS SUCCESSFUL

DR, WA IR WILL CARRY ON
OF WORK BEGUN BY
STUDENTS

PART

W1o is responsible for the high
prices at the Union? Where does the
money go? A few of the minor items
of e pense with which the Union has
been confronted should easily answer
these campus-perplexing questions.
For those organizations using the
Union assembly room for smokers and
other meetings of like nature, the
management has just completed the
purchase of a new canvas cover for
the floor at a cost of $1,000. The
cover previously used, which was of
the same quality as the new one,

How many of those students using
the free telephone service of the
Union know that last year the cost of
this service was more than $2,600
paid to the telephone company alone
without the additional expense of the
operators on the Union switchboard?
This service is open at all times to,
students free of charge and there
are more than 20 booths scattered
throughout the building.
In this article are summed only a
few of the small items of expense
necessary in keening un the Union

ume s to Present
Unusual Program
Many shows ot extraordinary merit
will be shown this year at the Mimes
theatre under the auspices of the
Mimes Repertoire company. In addI-1
tion to a repetition of "The Thirteenth
Chair" and "The Cloister," both of
which were played at the Mimes the-
atre last year, many new and unusu-
ally good plays will be presented this
year.
Galsworthy's play, "Justice," is one
of the greatest and most popular
plays of the day, and will be presented
by Mimes under the direction ,of E.
Mortimer Shuter. This play is a
tragedy, mingled here and there with
the humor of the office clerk, who has

ADVISORY C I
ISYSTEM SUCQEISFUL,

Of 1,745 rooms listed at the Union,
approximately 62 per cent were
rented this fall from the Union
through the Union rooming commit-
tee of which P. J. Schneider, '24, is
chairman. Nearly all of the 425 single
rooms listed were rented. More than
1,400 students were provided with
rooms by the committee.
Some opposition was met, says
Schneider, at first when some of the

NINETY-SIX PER CENT OF FRESH-
MEN GIVEN ADVISERS THIS
YEAR
"The work of the Union Upperclass
Advisory 'committee under the new
system originated this fall has been
unusually successful,, approximately
96 per tent of the freshmen enrolled
this fall having been assigned Upper-
class advisers," says J. E. Duffy, 24,
chairman of the committee. More
than 400 volunteer advisers were as-
signed to yearlings, he said.
The committee meets from 4 to

Studets Are Urged To Acquire
Knowledge Of Union Government
Few students know of or stop to bor, and a place for wholesome relaxa-
think about the history of Michigan's tion for students, so that their leisure
greatest institution, the Michigan time, their amusements and their stu-
Union. A large percentage of the dent interests, through the medium of
student body are totally ignorant of the University atmosphere of the
how the Union is controlled or ot just Union, might become a component,
how much power the different groups part of their education.
or persons on the governing bodies The government of the Union is
of the Union, may exercise. It is, vested in the Board of Directors and
therefore, no waste of time to discuss the Board of Governors. The former
such things, for every student should cpnsists of seven students, six alumni,
know about the father of college including the beneral Secretary of the
unions, the Michigan Union. Alumni association, three members of
The University of Michigan Union, the faculty, and the financial secre-

1

51

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