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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 30, 1922 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

C

JIGAN DAILY

,...

BETIN YEAS
New Coaching Staff Has Put New
Sprit Into Men; Bill Spaulding
Is Head Coach
THREE VETERAN BACKFIELD
'EN RETURN ADDING POWER
With several veterans back and
with their capable coach, Bill Spauld-
ing and his staff, awakening in the
numerous candidates a fighting spirit
almost lost, Minnesota faces the,
brightest football season in three
years. There has been a complete
revision of the athletic situation at
the Goplier school this year which has
resulted in a new spirit being de-
veloped. Fred Leuhring directs ath-
letics ,at Minnesota and he has secur-
ed to assist Spaulding, Leonard Frank
and Arnold Oss, former stars of the
University, and T. M. Metcalfe, Paul
London, and George Hauser.
When Michigan plays Minnesota at
Minneapolis November 25, a. strong
team should oppose the Wolverines.
Oliver Aas, veteran center and this
year's captain, has shown up well in
practice and bids fair to shine. Guard
material is plentiful With Abraham-
son, Larkin, who won his letter last
year, Rollit, Broman, Clapp, and Os-
ter showing possibilities.
Cox and McDonald Tackles
First call to tackle positions seems
to go to Cox and McDonald. Both
men are creating a sensation in prac-
tice against the scrubs. McCart and'
Schjoll may also be seen in the for-
ward wall. Ecklund, who played with
Valparaiso two years ago, is mention-
ed frequently as one of te ends while
the other end will have to be settled
among Jacobson, Gallagher, Merril;
and Cleffman.
Most f the veterans this year are
backfield men and in this Minnesota
is fortunate in having such men as
Matineau, McCreery, and Gilstad. Mat-
ineau will be used at one of the half1
back positions while McCreery will
play the other. Gilstad will most like-.
ly be seen at full back, If this com-
bination does not work, Spaulding has
a dozen other backfield candidates to
pick from.
Grose Probable Quarter
Grose and Myrum are putting up
the most interesting struggle in their
attempts at quarter back. Grose ap-
pears to be the better general of the
two but Myrum evens the score by be-
ing able to drop kick with precision.
Punting and passing will be taken
care of by Martineau, and Ecklund
will be called unlon to do the place
kicking as well as to be on the re-
ceiving end of forward passes.
With such a formidable array of
coaching and material it seems that
§ Minnesota is again due to become a
factor in Big Ten football.
ARREST ONLY TWELVET
IN FIRST- 6 DAYS115.OF
SAFETY FIST' DRIVE

REGENTS DECIDE TO
TEAR DOWN WEST HALL

-ion L. Ackerman, Francis R. Blakes-
lee, Frank T. Bleya, Julia E. Brittain,
John J. Burby, Roxa M. Carroll, Thom-
as F. Carson, Leota B. Clarke, Edna
R. Doughty, BPn C2. Fairman, Ellen L._

(Continued from Page One) Finley, Florence Ann Freeman, Juan-
Moore, Samuel P. Savage, Katherine ita Fuller, Edward A. Gee, Hazel I.
Moocre te alG cree Geer, Ada B. Giffin, Edna A. Groff
E. Schoettle. Paul G. Schroeder, Maryland E. Hartloff, Jeanette E. He-
Blanchd M. Smith Edna A. Stevens; witt, Sarah E. Hopper, Helen L.
Lina J. Ward, William T:'Vatson. Hough, Winifred A. Hubbell, Mary B.
Two Get J. I). Award Jefferds. Etha M. Lamb, Mary J. Law-
In the law .school CarlO. Brandt son, Tsau Ming Leung, Meyer M. Lev-
was granted the degree of master of in, Nellie Loss, Gertrude C. McGrain,
arts. The juris doctor 'degree was James L. MacGregor, Beatrice M. Ma-
awarded Earle E. Ewins and William son, Mabel M. Moore, Natalie Morgan,
H. Wilson. The degree of bachelor of Helen -N. Munger, Rowena M. Munro,
lows was given to Carl U. O. Bay, Earl IH. Nicholson, Ruth H. Probst,
Thomas S. Doughrty, Charles F. Ives, Martha E. Ratliff, Albert R. Renwick,
Walter A. Kirkby, Edward B. Mor- Nellie I. Richmond, Edelaine Rodin,
com, George I. Murphy, Carlos A. Ora W. Rush, Samuel P. Savage, Clara
Spiess, Judson L. Stark, Elmer L. G. Seller, Katherine E. Schoettle, Paul
Stephenson, William M. Webster, Jew- G. Schroeder, Blanche M. Smith, Rita
el E. West. F. Snyder, Edna A. Stevens, Aeriel E.
The degree of bachelor of science Stranahan, Jeptha W. Van Valken-
in civil engineering was granted to burg, Lina J. Ward, Buelah L. War-
Herman H. Block, Jeckiel Goldman, ner, Berenice M. Warsaw, William T.
William E. R. Erwin and Joseph A. Watson, Genevieve Whalley, Esther L.
Riggs. The degree of bachelor of sci- Wright, Nellie A. Yerkes.
ence in mechanical engineei ing was iThe special certificate in Embalm-
given to Frank Cerveny, John G. Cog- ing and Sanitary Science was granted
gan, Eugene Harbeck, Philip A. Hen- William Brushaber, Andrew B. Fish-
ault, Edwin L. Maim,Tlepdore 4i er, Mervin B. Howard, Louis W. Ker-
Nagle, Charles M.*Spaildifig' and Oli- likowski, Herbert L. Kribs and Dale
ver E. Sundquist. The degree of bach- E. Ranck. The Regents also announc-
elor of science in electrical engineer- ed the appointment of °a new instruc-
ing was given to Wayne K. Davidson,
Edward C. Earhart, Edwin I. Mosher B
and Lawrence P. Milrphy. The de- @
gree of bachelor ofscience in chem-
ical engineering was given to OliverI
F. Campbell, Howard,"G. Hodge, El- 0 '
wood G. Richardson, Liz* W. Thayer, _ _ _ _ _ _
Ying Ming Tse and Edward R. Whitte-
more. The degree of bachelor of sci- I EDS BARBER SLOP
ence in aeronautical engineering was . ILLER UAIDtI UHO
granted Howard. H. Couch. The de- WM. A. MILLER, Prop.
gree of bachelor of science' in naval
architecture and marine engineering
was granted James Douglas Dow and Three First Class Barbers
Francis I. Pahlow. The degree of,
bachelor of science in architecture
was granted William D. Cuthbert and "You knew me three
William K. Rindge. ., years at the Union."
Certificates Approved
Teacher's certificates were granted 1114 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
by the Regents to the following: Ma- {

tor in rhetoric, Robert D. Horn. A
new man has also been added to the
serological department of the medical
school. An appropriation was author-
:zcd for new x-ray equipment for the
department of roentgenology of which
Dr. Preston M. Hickey of Detroit was
recently made head. The National
Dentl association, it was announced,
has provided for the University a re-
search assistant, Miss Faith Palmer-
lee. Decision to increase the class
room space for the department of
dermatology was also made. The'
matter of the establishment of a
school of nursing was tabled. It was,
decided to provide a place in Uni-
versity hall for the meetings of the
Student council.

SISLER'S ATHLETIC CAREER
IS TRACED BY CODEL, '24,
George Sisler's athletic', activities,
on the Michigan diamond as well as,
with major league teams, are reviewed
in an article written by Martin Codel,
'24, appearing in the-current number
of Sporting Life, a magazine devoted
to athletic interests.
The article traces the great swats-
man's career throughout his college
days and his rapid rise to fame in the
big leagues, reaching the peak of his
fame this year by attaining the honor
of leading batter of both major
leagues.
Rider, the pen specialist.-Adv.

a
0

Did you ever have a shoe repaired that
you were proud to wear afterward?
If you didn't why don't you try our service? We
put the shoe on the last and completely re-build it,
replace all worn out parts and make it like new-
all for the same charge as for inferior work.
THIRTY MINUTE SERVICE
H. W. CLARK, 534 Forest Avenue
Open Evenings, 7:30 - 8:30

ANN ARBOR CUSTOM SH

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ANN ARBOR CUSTOM SHOE FACTORY

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for Men

.mow. 1

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for $9.00

The oxford we're telling you about is decidedly new and different.
It's so new in fact, that we haven't a picture cut of it yet.
It's made up in a rich shade of brown Norwegian grain, with a cor-
dovan tip and saddle. A beveled edge sole and flat broad heel com-
plete it. It's surely a winner.

I

HIESE FIRST CHILLY MORNINGS
remind a man that there are many months ahead
when a bathrobe will be mighty welcome.
We have the largest and most exclusive line, in the city

TI.

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O'Kane 8&..Hertler

For
Men

FOOTWEAR
335 S. MAIN ST.

For
Women

lj

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ANN ARBORS LEADING CLOTHIERS
"Exclusive, but not Expensive"
209 S. MAIN ST

Co.

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have Your Shoes Fitted by X-Ray

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1

TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth Ave. and Williami St.
REV. L. F. GUNDER1MAN,. Pastor

~u nag Church

services

FIRST CHURCH OF
CHRIST SCIENTIST.
409 S. Division Street
Sunday morning service, 10: 30.

'nxelf gf on

9:30-Studeit Bible Class,'

10:30-Morning Service.
6:30-Luther League.
7:30-Evening Service.

- Large numbers of the students in this University
come from homes and communities where religion is
honored and where attendance upon church services
is regarded as natural and necessary to worthy living.
The majority of our students have a highly commenda-
ble religious background and come with rather definite
ideas and beliefs concerning religion.
In the regular work of the University many of the
students will encounter facts and points of view dis-
tinctly new to them and at first thought strangely in-J
compatible with their religious training and beliefs.
For some, the inevitable result will be serious men-
tal conflicts. Some, without due consideration, will be
tempted to give up religion and throw the whole factor
overboard. Others will quarrel with the modern scien-
tific point of view and cling tenaciously to untenable
dogmas. Still others, more cautious in their thought
and more insistent upon squaring themselves with the
truth as they see it in both directions, will experience
prolonged and painful periods of doubt.
To all such I wish I could say a word born of ex-

perience which would steady them through this period
of intellectual struggle. Every thinking' person doubts
at times. By the very terms of the problems of thought,
you will not be able tor solve every intellectual diffi-
culty. Mystery apparently is a permanent element of
life. - Just there lies the glory of the mind. It will al-
ways have new fields' to conquer.
Undoubtedly the modern scientific point of view has
come to stay And I firmly believe that religion is a
normal and sovereign .interest in every symmetrical
life. As students, you will do well each week to at.-
tend the church of your choice and discover how ,wise-
ly and sympathetically you will be helped to see the
essential unity of life and to discover that the so-called
conflict between science and* religion long since has
been settled for'discriminating minds. Fortunately the,
churches of Ann Arbor are served by scholarly minis-
ters who sense fully these problems. Students are
wise who establish regular habits of church attendance.

Wednesday
meeting, 7:30.

Evening,. testimonyI

Sunday School, 11:45.

FREE
?gCharge
of Best
Quality
F OUN-
TAIN,
PEN
- INK
with every sale made before
October First
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
'ie Typewriter and Stationery
Store

Reading Room, 236 Nickels Arcade.
Open daily, 12 to 1 except Sundays and
Holidays.

ALL. ARE WELCOME.

EVERYONE IS WELCOME

"Safety First" campaign officials last
night felt more certain that the drive
for improving traffic .conditions had
not been in vain when yesterday
passed without arrests for violation
of -the new traffic law. With six days
of the campaign at an end less than 12
arrests have been made in the in-
terests of better traffic conditions.
This figure is considerably lower than
that for the past few weeks.
Complaints have been made to the
police department concerning the i4i-
terpretation of part 13 of section 2
of the new ordinance. This article
says, "Drivers of motor vehicles be-
/fore turning, stopping backing .or
changing their course, shall make sure
that such movement can be made with
safety and shall give audible or visible
signal of such intention."
Hold otorist Respoisible
Chief O'Brien explains that autoists
who are hit when backing out from a
parking space or driveway have no
cause for complaint, a-s they will ,be
held responsible for an accident if
they have not given the proper signal.
All confusing articles of the new ord-.
inance will be explained by Prof. A. H.
Blanchard in the public meeting to Ue
held at 4:10 o'clock Tuesday afternoon
in University hall.
it is the opinion of the officials in
*charge of the campaign that few uni-
versity students or members of the
faculty fully understand the conse-
quencesof vioating the new ordinance.
Jail Term rossible
it a person charged with speeding
or any other violation of the ordinance
pleads not guilty he is sent to jail
until he comes to trial. On the other
hand, if the' plea is guilty a fine of
$25 may be imposed. Inability to pay
the fine will result in iniprisonment
for not more than 10 days.
The committee believes that all per-
sons should be aware of these penal-
ties before the members of the Ann
Arbor branch of the Detroit Automo-
bile begin reporting violations of the
ordinance. Violations have not been
reported during the first part of the
drive to permit all persons to become
ncquainted with the ordinance, copies
of which may be obtained from police
headquarters.

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister
Service 10:40 a.m.
"GETTING INTO ONE'S STRIDE"
Sunday School 9:45, a.m.
SYoungPeople's' Supper 5:45 p.m.
Self-served at 15c charge by young
people, and open to students who
wish to . get acquainted.
Forum of Religidn, 6:30 p.m.
DR. PRESTON W. SLOSSON,
of the History Department, opens the
year's discussion on "MODERN AP-
PROACHES TO RELIGIOUS PROB-
LEMS."
Saturday, 8 p.m.
Get-Acquainted Party: Open and free.
"He serves all that dares be true."
-Emerson.

ANN ARBOR
BIBLE CHAIR

It01!7

I

M. L. BURTON.

--

AND

ZION LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth Ave. and Washington St.
E. C. STELLTIORN, Pastor
9: 3 A. M.-Pastor's Bible class in
the church parlor.
10:30 A. M.-(German) "Things Re-
vealed unto Babes."
5:30 P. M.-Social hour and refresh-
ments for members and friends
of the Student Club.
6:30 P. M.-Student Forum. Subject,,
"The Student Club and its Activ-
ities."
7:30 P. M. - Sermon, "The Truly
Free."

FIRST BAPTIST

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
G. A. NEUMANN, Pastor
Sunday school at 9:15 a.m.
Church Service at 10:30 a.m., conduct-
ed in the German language. Topic:
"An Apostle's Prayer for the
Church."
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN

CHURCH

"UPPER ROOM"
BIBLE CLASSES

I..

LAST TIME-TODAY
GARETH HUGHES
in-
"I CAN EXPLAIN"

R. EDWARD SAYLES, Minister
HOWARD R. CHAPMAN,.
Minister of University Students
Mr. Snyles' Sunday Topics
10:30-"Cristianity as an Attitude."
7:30-"Spiritual Gravitation."
Student Guild Class at 12:00 o'clock.
6:00-Guild Social Hour.
6:30-Guild Discussion,- "Why the
Baptist Guild?" Hugh Potter.

IANE HALL

See "Upper Room" Bulletin,
and Printed Schedule
Sunday Class for Men from
9:30 to 10:15

JOHNNY. HINES
"TORC*Y'S HOLDUP"

TRY

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH

10:34

12:04
2:34
4:04
6:34

1REV. A, W. STALKER, D.D., Minister
MISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director
0 A. M. Morning Worship: "Christianity Translated."
Special Music: Violin and Organ: "Andante Religiosa"
(Thome), -r. Clancy and Mrs. Rhead; "Benedictus" (Gou-
nod), theChoir; "Prayer Perfect" (Stenson), Miss Howe.
0 Noon. Bible Classes for Students in Wesley Hall.
0 P. M. Hospital' ik.
0-6:30 P. M. Open- House at Wesley Hall.
0 P. M. Wesleyan Guild Devotional Meeting.
Mr. Julius Glasgow, Leader.
P. M. Evening Wor'ship: "Thje Sub-conscious Life." #
Special Music: Violin and Organ: "Vespers" (from Berceuse
Jocelyn) (Godard), Mr. Clancy and Mrs. Rhead; "The Day
is Past 'and Over" (Marks), the Choir; "Gloria" (Buzzi-Pec-
cia), Mr. Adams.I
STUDENTS ESPECIALLY INVITED TO ALL OF THE SERVICES

Corner Third and West Huron Sts.
CARL A. BRAUER, Pastor
CELEBRATION
OF MISSION FESTIVAL
Three services: 10 a.m., 3 p.m., 8 p.m.

CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
DIVISION AND HURON
REV. L. A. BARRETT, D.D., Minister
LEWIS C. REIMANN, Sec'y Men Students
MISS HELEN SHAW BROEKSMIT, Seey Women Students
MORNING WORSHIP
10:30
"WHAT IS RELIGION?"
STUDENT CLASS
12:00;
PROF. W. D. HENDERSON, LEADER
"WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE NEW TESTAMENT"
YOUNG PEOPLE'S MEETING

7:34

rev.
.Rev.
Rev.

Mr. C.
Mr. G.
Mr. H.

Speakers:
Strasen of Plymouth.
Claus of Detroit
Fehner of Windsor, Can.

D.inners
Where quality is remembered
when the price is long forgot-
ten. All meals nicely, but not
to highly flavored. Linen cov-
ered tables, where waiters are
courteous and serve everybody
alike.1 .
A place to relax, where you
are not bored by Radio or Jazz.
Everything carefully supervised
by Mr. and Mrs. Willits. Twen-
ty-two years at the Northwest
Corner of Michigan Campus.
Noon Meal ............ 506

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
"THE STONE CHURCH WITH A WARM WELCOME"
hERBERT ATCHINSON JUMP, Minister
E. KNOX MITCHELL, JR., S dent Pastor
At 9:30-Students' Bible Classes for Men and Women.
At 10:30-Preaching by Mr. Jump. "The Copyrighted Christ."
Musical program under direction of Earl Moore,
University Organist
At 1 :00-Students' Open Forum will organize. Real talks on real subjects
by real men and women. Prof Thomas Reed will sneak on "The

Synodical Conference Students are
'nvited to meet at 420 W.-Liberty St.,
Friday, Oct. 6, 1922, 8 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
(DISCIPLES)

;5t. Rnbrew's EpiscopaI Cburch

SOCIAL HOUR 5:30 MEETING 6:30
STACY BLACK, '24E, LEADS
"WHAT ARE WE HERE FOR?"

COR. CATHERINE AND DIVISION STREETS-
HENRY LEWIS, Rector
CHARLES T. WEBB, Studient Pastor

S. UNIVERSITY

Opening day for the season. Mrs.
Bryce at the organ. Mr. Clark will
sing. A good musical program.
G. K. Lewis, National Secretary from
St. Louis, is expected to speak at
10: 30. All Disciple students are in-

Evening Meal ........ 64

Sunday Dinner...

7:35-Holy Communion.
10:30-Holy Communion and Sermon: "Deadlines in Life."
Preacher, Mr. Lewis.

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