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November 29, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-11-29

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1

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COLDER

Pp,

f rt

0%1

AID
THE

TODAY

CROSS

VOL. XXXIII. No. 57

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1922

PRICE FIVE

M

FRANCE PREPARES
TO FORCE GER HMAN
INDEMNIIY ACTION

WILL OCCUPY RUHR DISTRICT
DEMANDS ARE NOT MET BY
JANUARY 15

Ii{!

EWIS MRQUIS lL T4O CLONTSE ONISMET DECLAES
ADDRESS EPISCOPA1IANS In view of the short time remaining
in which posters for the spring trip
of the Varsity Glee clubs may be
HOLD 'ANNUAL BANQUELT AT L. - turned in, students who intend to sub-jf
ION FOR STUD NT AND T it posters or the contest ar urg
ULTY MEIIBERS to finish their work as soon as pos- r CT WITH V S
William Draper Lewis, author, edi- sible in order to allow plenty of time -
tor, former dean of the law school at for any correction or suggestions on STATES iEEMALISTS ARE READY
the University of Pennsylvania, and a TO BEGIN NEGOTIATIONS
factor for many years in national pol- The contest is being held by the AT ANY TIME
itics, will speak at the annual Epis; business manager of the Varsity GleeI
copalian banquet for students and fac, clubs, James C. Stevens, '23, who has AMERICAN INSTITUTES
ulty members to be held Dec. 11 at laid down certain rules for the con-I
the Union. test which will award three cash IN TURKEY SAID SAFE
The student speaker for the occa- prizes of $10, $5, and $3 to the win- .
sion will be John A. Bacon, '24, anzl ners. The preferred size for the pos- Ambassador Anxious About Washing-
the toastmaster will be Rev. Samuel ter is 18 by 22 inches. The posters ton Attitude on Near Eastern
S. Marquis, of Detroit, now rector of are to contain no more than three Controversy
St. Joseph's church in that city. The calorscod y no
tickets forbthe dinner will be on sae on m ha e nmoe (By Associated Press)
at Wahr's book storr. upon them than the name of the club, (
forwhich the correct style in this Lausanne, ,Nov. 30.-Turkey will bej
Mr. Lewis bnh is career* in 1forintis*

I IKEWISE HOPES FOR
INTERNATIONAL LOAN

HOBBS FORE-CASTS
FEDERAL GHANGES
Speaking before the second banquet
of the year given by the Barristers,
yesterday noon in the Union, Prof. W.
ti. Hobbs told the eighteen members
present that he believed the present
method of electing the United States-
president must be changed. Accord-
ing to Professor Hobbs, the present
convention system is open to rgraft
and corruption and does not allow the
common man a chance in the election
of the chief executive.
. He further asserted that changei
are gradually coming about in the
government of this country which are
strict departure from the form of gov-
ernment as planned by the fathers.
He attributed these changes to in-
creased city life, the easier spread of
propoganda through enlarged com-
munication facilities and the influx of
a large foreign population which i
not easily assimilated.
ANNO.UNCESENAT
SEECIO.TDAI

COMPLETE PLANS FOR PESDNTBRT
TRIAGUILARDEBATE IIHR' A
NORTHWESTERN, iCRIG ND ,).
CHICAGO UNIV SITI E
COMPETE ON OMASEATORS

I,

Poincare Would Cancel French Debt
To England and Reduce Repar-
ations Figure
Paris, Nov. 28.-Although the ma-
jority of the members of the repara-
tions commission are opposed to pre-
m iier Poincaire's plan for direct ac-,
tion for the collection of the Ger-
man indemnity there is a growing feel-
ing that the French government will
soon be in a position where it will be
forced to take independent measuretj
against Germany.
Plan to Lower German Idemnity I
Following the announcement of thq
cabinet's plan for occupation of the
Ruhr district, in the event Francqe
does not obtain satisfaction before
Jan. 15, the meeting of premiers which
will probably be held in Paris early
next week has assumed considerably
more importance. The presence of
Prime Minister Bonar Law at the con-
ference now seems assured, but par-
ticipation of Premier Mussolini of Ita-
ly is not yet confirmed.
M. Poincaire has a definite plan to
place before the, premiers and espe-
cially before Mr. Bonar Law. This
plan which was approved at the cabi
inet meeting today provides for a ret
duction of the Germany ide.nity to
a reasonable figure, probablyfifty bil-
lion goldmarks, in return for concel
lation of the Frenchdebt to Great
Britain.
May Raise Intersectional Loan
It also contemplates raising a large i
international loan, half to be devoted'
to stabilization of the German mark'
and the remainder to payment of ree
paration to France.
The Associated Press was informed
tonight by members of the French del -
egation that unless such a plan is
agreed to by the allies France will
"take the only other course open to
her, namely seizure of the products
of the Ruhr and control of the Rhine-,
land."
RELIGIOUS INSTITUTE
VHs FOURTH SESSION
George Oscar Bowen, of the School
of Music, opened the fourth session of
the Institute of Religious Education
last night at Lane hall.
Classes were conducted by Prof.
Leroy Watyrman, of the department1
of Semetics, on "The Relation of the:
Old Testament to Christianity". Prof.
Calvin 0. Davis, of the department of
secondary education, on "Teaching
Methods"; Prof. John I. R. Brumm, of
the department of journalism, on
"Some Changing Concepts"; Prof. I.
1). T. Hollister, of the department of
public speaking, on "Oral Interpreta-
tion of the Bible"; and Thomas M.
Iden of the Ann Arbor Bible Chair,
on "The Story of the Bible".
These men will continue a discus-
sion of the same subjects at the fifth
and last session of the institute, which
will be held Dec. 5.

as an instruetor of Historical Institu-
tions in the Wharton school of . the
University of Pennsylvania. This pp-
sition he held but a short while, Ilo
coming then a lecturer. on economics
at Haverford college which position=
he heed until 1896, when he became,
dean of the law school of the ULni-l
versity of Pennsylvania. Here he re.-I
mained until 1914, when he bace ac-j
mained until 1914, when he became
actively enkaed in other lines.

case
Glee

is, "The University of Michiganj
Club".

C, OP, CONTINUES
ANTI-LYNCH FIGHT!

Sgad to rmake a general treaty with
the United 'States and will be hap-
py to begin negotiations at any time,
Ismet Pasha informed the Associated
Press tonight.
The representative of the Kemalist
government has not yet begun any
treaty parley with Ambassador Child,E
but said he stood ready to inaugurate
any exchange of views at the first
available moment.
"We should have a new treaty deal-
ing with commerce and consular Mat-
ters," he continued. "I hope above all,
.hat America will not worry about
he future of educational and philan-
thropic institutes in Turkey. We want
hem to stay and have no intention
of adopting laws which would embar-
fEQ I1,fl th in ti i f hkm d i I

He is author
over Congress and
Action" which waE
of "Our Sheep an
lished 1891; of "R
ment of Incorpore
ed in 1904; of
Roosevelt"; and
economic and, hist
V rslty Band Play
Classical i

of "Federal Power
d its Effect on -State
s published in -1891;
id the Tariff", pub-
estraint of Infringe-
al. Rights", pub'ish-
"Life of Theodore6
of numerokus othcr
torical pamphlets.
s Wide Selection of
and Popular"
aslc

Senate Democrats Stage "Most ScIen-
tifically Conducted Filabuster" 1j
in Years
REPUBLICAN'S MAY FORCE
THANKSGIVING SESSI0N
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 28.-Republican,
members of the Senate, after a four
hour filabuster waged by the Demo-
crat, and after threats from the dem-
ocratic side of continued obstruction,
voted in caucus tonight to continuo
the fight in behalf of the Dywer anti-
lynching bill.
A further proposal was advanced te
hold the Senate in session on Thanks*
giving day, if the action was necessary
to 'break Democratic resistance. The
vote is understood to have .been 24
to 1. The Republican caucus brought
to a close a rather turbulent dcayatj
the Senate wing of the capitol, for1
j the democratic Senators,,.acting in ac-
cord'with a stand taken several days
ago in party caucus, showed immedij
ately upon the convening of the Sen
ate that they proposed to block thq
anti-lynching bill in every possible
way.
Led from the floor by Senator Har-
rison, Mississippi, the' Democrats
started what they frankl-y conceded
to be a filabuster the minute the chap1
lain concluded the morning prayer.
Senate attaches characterized it ar
"the most scentifically conducted filat
buster" car'tied on in the Senate in
years.

Majority Oi
iinte!d

Early Candidates Elaim.
by Political Fore-
cas;

I
f

ANAYOP.JAXES COUZENSD
ALONE STILL FAVOREF'

DANCING AND FARCE GIVE
ZEST TO ENTERTAINXEE1
A crescendo conclusion to a medi-,
ocre program left a favorable impres-i
sion in the minds of'the mixed crowd
of band enthusiasts that .gathered for
the fall Bounce of the' Varsity band'
last night in Hill auditorium. The
variety and quality of the usual camw
pus entertainment were listed on the
program, which presented some well-
established and some. newly-devel p-
ed student talent.
The band, presumably the featuro
of the evening, proved surprisingly
well drilled for an: altogether- ama-
teur organization, although the com,
positions attempted were at times be
yond its musical powers 'Some famil-
iar airs from "Carmen", a "caprice"
by Rolfe-a frivolous atid occasionally
tiresome piece, some Michigan songs'
arranged by Director Wilfred Wil.
son, a Spanish Rhapsody by Ferroni,
and some meloncholy jazz left a dul
taste that was only relieved by the
frivolous and quite enjoyable satirq
on "The Girl I Ifk Behind Me", by
Bellstedt.
Hortense Hoad, '24, and Gordon
Weir,' '24, a rather capable dancer,
opened the vaudeville program with a
Russian peasant dance.
Burton Hyde, '25M, now a famil
iar figure to those who have the habit
of attending campus entertainments\
obliged with some pleasant pieces on
his rippling marimbaphone. Som'w
mellow chords harmonized well with
the accompaniment of the piano,
played by John Besancon, '25M.
Robert Dieterle, '23M, campus bari-
tone, reappeared, with his clear and
well-controlled voice, to sing the Tor-
eador song, an air. from Rigoletto,
"The Road to Manadalay", and "My
Little Gypsy Sweetheart", all well-
known. Gage E. Clarke, '22, accom-
panied with skill and sympathy.
"The Scoop", by Leo J. Hershdorf-
er, '23, (De Joisey Boid) and Don Con-
ey, '24, ('Caligula), a journalistic farce
of some cleverness, gave Bethany ILov
ell, '25, an opportunity for graceful
and spontaneous acting in an inti-
mate setting. L. Milford Anderson,
'24M, was convincingly real as the
stage manager of the young lady, and
Howard A. Donahue, '24, had a jour,
nalistc manner that was indicative of
earlier experience.
The banjo quintette that was the
last skit on the program was received
with uproar and developed some in-
tricate rythms. The popular songs on
its program were presented with fine
harmony, varied occasionally 'with
plaintive singing by the vocal mem-
ber of the group, and its syncopation
was undoubtedly the most enjoyable
music of the evening.
The band, closing with a rousing
selection, "The Victors", completed
the evening. J. P. D.

rass Lne ont inua1uce or ,toe aami ape Detroit Nov., 28.-The name of
American altruistic work among our DMchigans new Senator to be apf
people poiansyner'nor o bet pll
Ismet ,.seems .anxious about the pointed by Governor Groesbeck to fill
America official attitude towards the the vacancy created by the resigna-
Tmrica officald a depn ot tion of Truman H. Newberry will be
Turkish _demanid for adoption. of, the made known tomorrow, the Governor
capitulations saying: "We wish to es- annonced today.
tablish our own courts and try all Although no definite information
cases. Foreigners may be insured Atog odfnt frain
oaes. Fig e r tay be isured had come from the executive as to
they will get a fair, trial. Religion who he might choose, political gos j
is one. thing in our country' and these
law another and the law will be fair- sip has eliminated virtually every one
ly administered." of the early men who have been men-
l___________________1 tioned except James Couzens, Detroiai
"munibipal ownership" mayor.
BothHthe Governor aid Mayors
9o Couzens refused to discuss the ques-
tion in any way. Reports that th
SIT . ayor was leading dleeloped today
lID1 councilman J. W. Caspator,
f drafted a resolution for presentation
. Membership in the nlversity Chain- in the city council calling upon the
ber of Commerce, the old Commerco mayor not to accept a senatorial ap-
club, is being enlarged, Floyd C. pointment. Before it could be present-,
ed, Mayor Couzens learned of the
Reinke, president of the organization, ed. and ue s whawal. The
states. Seniors, juniors, and in somlinglan and urged its withdrawal. The
cases sophomores, who are enrolled resolution was withheld.
In business administration c urses, Considerable pressure has been
Ire eigible for membership. brought to bear on the Governor, it
Blanks of application may be se- has been learned, to avert appoint-
cured from the secretary of the eco- ment..of the'Mayor to the Senate on
nomics department. Students desirt the grounds that projects undertak-
ing membership in this .organization- en by Mr. Couzens would suffer as a
should fill out these slips and depositt result.
them in the old Commerce box in the,
Economics building as soon as pos- GRADUATE SECURES
sible. A membership committee will
then act upon the application and will IMPORTANT PLACE
notify the student of its acceptance or -
rejection. . Robert W. Kneebone, '21, has just
This organization is affiliated with been elected over several candidates!
the National Chamber of Commerce to become the director and executive
and closely connected with other near- secretary of the Charleston, W. Va.,!
by. chambers. This is the first time Community Welfare Federation. His
a college chamber of commerce has work will be to co-ordinate the ac-
been attempted and it is the plan of tivities of the 13 charitable institu-
the local. organization to extend. its tions of that city, to collect and dis-
membership to other colleges. burse all the funds of these organi-
The Univerhity Chamber of Com- zations, and in general direct the so-
merce will cooperate with the Univer4 cial policy of the community.'
sity in securing positions for gradu- Kneebone received his M.S. In mu-
ates of the business administration nicipal administration last year while!
department. he was an assistant in the political
science department. Since. that time
COURSES DROPPED AFTER he has been doing research work in
FRIDAY TO BE GIVEN 'E connection with the Detroit bureau
of zovernmfLLntalj rarI I.nh u"'grill

Members of the Varsity debating
squad who will participate in the tri-
angular debate with Chicago and
Northwestern on Jan. 19 were yester-
Jay assigned the particular phases of
the question on which they are to
speak. The team brief was finished
several days ago and the two teams#
have been meeting regularly and dis-
cussing the proposition that will 1:
used this year.
The question that will be debated
is, Resolved: That the United States
should adopt the British - system of
unemployment insurance.
The debate will be the twenty-fifth
annual contest with these schools. The
Michigan affirmative team will meet
! the Northwestern negative trio in Ann
Arbor, and the negative team will de-
bate the Chicago affirmative team at
Chicago. The Chicago negative team
will compete against the Northwest-
ern affirmative team at Northwestern
university. In this way, there will be
a debate in each of these schools on
the evening of Jan. 19,
- i
Ex-Anibassador Criticizes Memoirs of
Wilhelm for "Historicf
Inaccuracy"
VERSION OF EVENTS IN 1918 j
I DECLARED TO BE ONE-SIDED
. (By Associated Press)
Berlin, Nov. 28-Germany's old sys-
tem of government fell to ruin "but
unfortunately all of us bear the
blanie beocause we consented to thisI
system so ong, " Count Von Berns-
dorff writes in his periodical Demo-
cratic Germany in the course of a
sharp criticism of the former Kaiser's
recently published memoirs.
Count Bernsdorff finds the ex-Kaiser
leaves three impressions with theI
reader-regret that it was, written--
surprise at the mind which learned
nothing and has forgotten nothing-
and its "historic inaccuracy".
The former ambassador takes issue
with Wilhelm over the progress of
events in November, 1918, declaring
he has given just as one sided a ver-
sion as did the former crown prince
in his memoirsI He denies that Prince
Maximillian of Baden forced the Kais-
er out as the latter charges, adding
that the chancellor was not so com-
pletely "in the Bands of Scheide-
inann' as William has assumed.
BAND TRIP FUND DEFRAYS1
CELBATO XPENSESJ

WIRES GROESBECK HE DOES N
WISH TO BE CONSIDERED
FOR OFFICE
DECISION WELCOMED
FACULTY AND STUDEN'
Danger to Further Expansion of
University Believed
Averted
President Marion L. Burton brou
the speculation regarding his
pointment as United States sena
to an end yestei'day at 12:30 o'c
in a 'telegram to Governor Gr
I beck. The message read: Gov. Al
under J. Groesbeck, Lansing, Mb
gan: After careful consideration
have concluded to ask you to w
draw my name from further con:
eration for the senatorship. I dee
appreciate the .honor you have d
me. M. L. BURTOi
Decisot Not A Surprise
The action taken by President But
came onthe day set for the appo
ment of a new senator, with his n
remaining steadily in the foregro
among those who are thought li
to receive the appointment. In
message to Governor Groesb
President Burton spoke for the sec
time regarding the senatorship, si
the governor's visit to Ann Arbor I
week. To those who have been
close contact with the situation,
decision of President Burton did
come as a surprise, although thron
out the state and especially in I
sing, it was believed that he
the ideal man for the position.
I independence of any political% cir
I and the esteem i~m which lihe is "x
by the citizens of the statewere
sidered OPstinct points in his favo
It was President Burton's deci
at the outset that he would not
cept any position which would a
fhis connections with the Univers
n mnakimgg his A iieh ddt
held to his original statement n
on the day that he was Informed I
his name had been mentioned 'for
position.
Eurton Favorable Candidate
Members of the faculty and
student body were unanimous
night in welcoming the action.
though those who voiced their 'c
ions on the matters, admitted t
President Burton was the ideal e
cessor of Truman H. Newberry, as
man who was fuly qualified to cc
teract the criticism whih surrou
ed the election and subsequent b
service of the ltter, they believed
the danger to the continued ex:
sion of the University through
President going to Washington,
been satisfactorily arverted.
Moore Sooist't
Twilight Reci
Earl V. Moore, of the School of 3
sic, will be soloist at the weekly T
light Organ recital to be given 'at 4
o'clock this afternoon in H ill audit
Sium. The general pubic is miv:
to attend, but is requested to-be 4s
ed promptly as the doors will be c
ed during the performance of n
bers. Following is the program;
Sonata No. 1, in A minor... Boro'
Allegro ma non troppo;
Andante; Allegro con fuoco
Eegy.Nc
Oriental Sketch, No.( tukish.
. .. . .Ti
.The Crfew

ECONOlMY WILL GOTEN
BUNGT BURTON SAYS~
DEANS PREPARE ESTIMATES FOR
ACTION AT BOARD OF REGENTS
MEETING IN DECEMBER
Economy will govern the making of
the 1923-1924 University budget, Pres-
ident Marion L. Burton stated yester-
day. Savings are to be made at ev-
ery possible point, without, howeverI
overlooking the needs which will
come from the anticipated increases in
attendance. Reductions in the salf
aries of present members of the facul-
ty will not be made, and deserved in-
raa will ha riv tlh h +ha il_

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Disposition of the $450 which was
collected at the pep meeting in Hill
auditorium and in- the theaters on
Nov. 21 for the purpose of sending the
band to Minnesota has been complet-
ed by the Student council. The money
was not used for this purpose because
the funds raised were insufficient to
defray the trip expenses of the organ-
ization.

Slated To Lead
Senate Democrats

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creases wis oe given, oug ine sai-
ary of every faculty man will be scan- I N course may be dropped after
ned carefully before increases are I Friday of this week without a gradel
authorized. of "E" going down on the record of
The 1923-24 budget will be the sec- the student, save under extraordin-
ond drawn up under the present elab- ary circumstances, according to Prof.
orate and painstaking method. Th W. R. Humphreys, assaitant dean of
1922-23 budget, covering the period the literary college. Before any stu- i
from June 30, 1922, to June 30, 1923, dent may drop a course; he must re-
was 4,649,982.80. The budget for 1921-. ceive permission from his instructor,
1922 was $4,406,429.53. Neither of the dean and fill out the necessary
these figures include the building pro- "change of elections" blank in the!
gram, which has been carried under: registrar's office.,
another heading. The building opera-
tions will again be listed separately Dance Fraud Examined Yesterday.
when the new budget is compiled. Fifteen students who fradulently 1
A detailed estimate of the expected secured tickets to the Union dance{
income of the university will be pre-. on the weekend of the Michigan-Wis-
pared by Secretary Shirley W. Smith consin football game met yesterda: ,
before the December meeting of the afternoon with the House committee
Board of Regents. Approximately of the Union. After an examination
$3,000,000 is available from the state of most of the men, their names and
mill tax. Student fees bring in ap- proposed penalties were submitted to'
proximately $1,000,000 and approxi- the Board of Directors of the Unionj3
mately $500,000 is received from var-'
Ious other sources. This income sup-!
plies expenditures for salaries, equip-
mient, administration, and activities DO YOU WEAR
of a similar nature, while the funds
for the building program are appro- GLASSES?
priated by the state legislature from Those who do know how im-
other sources. portant glasses are to their
The deans of each school and' col- comfort. Such people are very
lege on the campus are at present much discomfited by their loss. 1
preparing estimates of their respec- .
tive rem irements, which will h euh- And so it i with a good many

B Q TR A .s
BANQUET FRIDAY The major portion of the fund colj Festival. Toccata....I
lected will be used to take care of the
Presbyterian Young People will expenses incurred for tihe "welcome . . .
hold their annual banquet at 6 o'clock home" celebration which was stage lish Mser
Friday night in the church parlors. upon the return of the team Sunday A
Miss Marie Preston, secretary of night. Any balance which remains;j Assumes Da
the Women's Board of Home Missions,lwill be turned over to the Varsity
of Chicago, will speak on "Opportu- band. -
nities for College Women in Social Money received from pledges made
and Religious Work," and Dr. Mar. -in the council rooms Saturday morn-
shall R. Olsen, director of the Howell ing and Monday afternoon will be re-
Neighborhood House, Chicago, , will turned to the donors by mail the tat-.
give a paper on "Christian Americani- ter part of this week.
zation via the Neighborhood House."
Mrs. John Vanderwilt will give sev- c
eral vocal selections and Rex Moule, Sympathy Note Of
'26, will give a violin solo. William T. 'M edea' Portrayal
Williams, '23M, will be toastmaster.
The banquet is in charge of the Vo-
cations department of the church and Sympathy, a beautiful voice, and
tickets are now on sale at the main grace of movement, characterized Miss - -
desk in Lane hall. ! Dorothea Spinney's presentation of .-
"The Medea" of Euripides, last even-
MUST SIGN UP BY FRIDAY ing, at Sarah Caswell Angell hall, un-
FOR UNION BOWLING TOURNEY' der the auspices of the American As-
sociation of University women. Unlik 1
Attention of the athletic managers his predecessors in the Greek drama,
is called to the Interclass Bowling Aeschylus and Sophocles, Euripides
tournament which will be held be-I has created individuals. Thus in "The
ginning Dec. 4 in the Union bowling Medea'', he gives us a picture of a
n lir,, 1'r'nmmni..nnn ,r fnanf an. *h, 6fifth. nan 4t nvA 4 ni~n n woman

1 i r V ea mI.ali researc . Hae win
assume his new duties Dec. 1-.
PRESBYTERIANS}

Senator F. M. Simmons
Sen. F M. Simmons of North Car-

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