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November 26, 1922 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-11-26

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x Ws " THE MICHIGAN DAILY' SUNDAY,:

NOVEMBER 26,

Theaters
(Continued from Page Nine.)
New York's picturesque East Side
There is physical combat galore, mys-
tery runs rampant witn a minglin i
of love and hates unbridled in their
intensity. Most startling to the eye
is a remarkable dive done by a speed-
ing automobile from the deck of a
ferryboat.
The title of the story comes from
a series of pledges, made ether will-
ingly or unwillingly by the principal
characters. In the opening scenes
Tom Moore, the hero, pawns his life
to the service of an international
gambler, while Charles Gerard, a
drug addict, and James Barrows, an
old cab-driver who has pawned his
soul for a drink, make their parts
especially realistic.1
Richard .Barthelmess goes back to
the Virginia mountains, the location
of his unforgettable "Tol'able David,"
for his most recent First National
picture, "The Bond Boy," which be-
gins a four-day engagement Wednes-
day.
As Joe Newbolt, impoverished son
of aristocratic parents, be is forced
to bind himself, out to Isom Chase
to work until he is twenty-one in or
der to save his mother from the poor
house. Chase is acedientally killed
in an unfortunate marital tangle, and
Joe's arrest for murder follows. The1
boy's thrilling escape after his con-
demnation, and his solving of the1
mystery which brings about his own I
freedom and happiness are dramatic-
ally woven into a charming love story
in this screen version of George Wash-
ington Ogden's fascinating tale.
The cast includes Mary Thurman as
leading lady, Mary Alden, the best
loved "screen mother", Charles Hill
Mailes, and Virginia Magee.
ORPHEUX
"Who Are My Parents", a William
Fox special photodrama, is the open-
ng attraction this week. The play
brings out in a striking manner the
differences in marriage law provis-
ions in our states, and shows what
complications may and do develop be-
cause of these variations.
"' ned", a delightful comedy-
drama starring Ed (Hoot) Gibson,
will be the feature for Wednesday
and. Thursday. One of the many
thrills in this picture comes in a
scene where the bsar steals some wild
honey from a swarm: of bees. WhileF
he is in a'tree enjoying his -loot a;
bear comes along; and wants to sharef
It. Gibson, brings the, bear back to,
town alive and only a few ,Jumps be-
hind him. The pursuit ends when
the bear's owner, a strolling beggar,
runs up and slips a collar and chain
on his pet. This is the first inkling
Gibson has that :the bear was Justl
playing tag with him.
Jack Hoxie In "The Marshal of
Moneymint", will complete this weeks
program.
IYUE TH
"Rich Men's Wives," a picture with
a stirring heart appeal, a caabl
cast, suitable settings and just the
right amount of atmosphere, begins
a four-day run 'here today. The theme
shows a deep understanding and sym-
pathy for the unfortunate girls who
are born, bred, and imprisoned in
gilded cages, and brings forth sharp-
ly the query of whetherrrich men's
wives are to be pitied, scorned, or en-
vied.
The central figure of the story is 3
young girl who has always had every-

Attaon an Eutnut
130 Nickels Arcade
PGone ASCW
MRS. GRACE VAN SCHICR
FIRE!o FIRE ! FIRE !
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thing she desired-anything except
the attention and love her parentr
were too busy to shower upon herj
The mother, a vain, ambitious, mod-
arn sort of a matron, overlooked the?
fact that her daughters might care
for her own mother-love, and thei
father thought his check book an ad-{
mirable and suitable substitute for his
parental responsibility.
The cast includeS Caire Windsor,l
House Peters, Gaston Glass, Rosemary
Theby, and . Baby Richard Headrick.I
"My Old Kentucky Home," a mo-1
tion picture, of Mother love and a.
real Southern romance, will be shown
the latter half of the week. It is a
story of an aristocratic Southern
widow who has heard nothing from 1
her son for two years. He has been
railroaded to prison and, when re-'
I leased, is too proud to let his mother
know he is an ex-convict.
The boy is on the brink of plung-
ing into the underworld when 'he is
roused by the strains of "My Old Ken-
tucky Home". He goes home and is
successful in keeping his secret from
his mother until he is cleared from
the false charge.
! S oroity to Itold Bridge Parny
Bridge 'and five hundred will both
be played at the bridge party to he!
given from 3 to 5:30 o'clock on, both'
December 1 and 2 by the Alpha Omi-
cron Pi sorority for the benefit of the
house flowers and home-made candyi
will be sold at reasonable prices at thati
time. Men are invited.

Francisco, Washington and all the oth- leading role-Felix Tarbell. who wins SHlWERT-MICHiGAN (Detroit) panion of dissolute characters; bile
Th!E tage er big-time cities, mean anything to susceptible females with epigrams. Sheriden's "The School For Scan- the other poses as a "holer fthan
he gthe theatre-lovers of Ann Arbor, heln B3ut Felx ha a wife and here fe dal," one of the most brilliant lays thou." Hypocracy wins for a/time
iEthis city is about to enjoy a festivalwith the able backing of scanda, but
Yc music and spectacle, or drawa and story takes its start. His last des-of the past two centuries, will be of) the outcome is a force of honest y and
(Sunday) comedy, which it will reinmmer for perate ihrtation is the one on which tered this week by the Bonstelle conli justice. Comedy, satire, and r manc
An important theatrical event is the many years to come. thm curtain rises for the first act. His pany with Miss Bonstelle paying the maintain a vivid, fascinating nterest
i i iaffair with Norma Famon has reached role of Lady Teazle. r u the pa
engagement of "Up in The Clouds," a Nt intus generation has aPro~the danerous stage: though his The brilliant wit of Sheridan, the gpay
new musical comedy produced under duction of such magnitude andw inte ife knows his weakness for women manners of the elegant but artificial
the personal direction of Jos. M.e st been seen here. It is as if tic good she takes it lightly enough unt4 her society represented by his master- Not Enough Visitors Use %uldes
G0(,1nrtnJ ays sof the theatrethwer withulest friend convinces her that her piece, has rarely been equalled by Guides for the use of visetors who
Gwicoi philanderng husband has gone too any modern writer and explains why wish to see the campus and, have the
stone, who is responsible for "Take names in. the east. Fourteen massiv e riCl
ItFom, weh" hich as si o "the Snams and the early urteemassi ar. Then the long-patient, practical this is one of the few pays that has points of interest pointed ou to them,
It From Me," which has delighted the- scenes and the nearly nine hundred and unimaginative wife finally goes survived the changes of time. so far, have not been called into use
atre-goers for the past two seasons. costumes are the exact duplicates in on the war-path and a battle of wits The story concerns the efforts of ec(lrt on a few occasions. The need
tre-goerforthe pa twob rseon atlesign and fabric with those that Lon- begins which runs through many two brothers, or rather of the friends is still apparent as some deans have
The production will be presented at don created, that New York copied, striking scenes and -unexpected situ- of the two brothers, to win for one or been compelled to show the visitors
the Whitney Theatre Nov. 26. and that all the other representative ations. Helen Tarbell plots revenge the other the inheritance of an uncle. around, but unless more use is made
"Up In The Clouds" played for five American cities have praised. F. Ray and Felix discovers the plot-but One brother is an acknowledged of the guides the system will be dis-
months at the Garrick Theatre, Chica- . Comstock and Morris Gest, its gen somewhat too late. I spendthrift, profligate and boon com- continued.
ern n n in fhrn~h 4 n ,,,,~o, ;. ' r1im rrnin7('.rt. av r nnrori min7r A

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go, running tmrougn the summer in e jJulXp)ouucers, naveU JUZeUtI ur
the face of the terrific heat; no higher city her rightful place on the theatri-
recommendation could be given this cal map, with promise of other great
excellent attraction. things, should we prove ready to re-1
As is the custom with a musical ceiv( them.
comedy bearing the Gaites trademark,
"Up in the Clouds" will contain many GARRICK (Detroit)
novel features, one of the most amaz- Leo Ditrichstein, a comedian and
ing being the "cloud" scene in the first
act, out of which appear the different creator of many famous roles, returns
characters of the play, to Detroit this week, after a season's
absence, for the first production of
(Friday and Saturday) Ben Hecht's play "Under False Pre-
"Chu Chin Chow" is really coming. tenses", A company of well known
The dates are Friday and Saturday, players has been chosen to portray
Dec. 1 and 2, and it a five-year rec. the group of unusual types drawn
ord in London, two in New York, and from newspaper life and the world
the guaranteed metropolitan produc- of the theater by the Chicago novel-
tion and cast, the same that has play- ist and newspaper man.
ed Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, San I Mr. Ditrichstein will portray the

P H YSIOLOGY VL ABORAT RY
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A MICHIGAN INSTITUTION

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Overooat

NOTHING GETS ON ONE'S NERVES M 0 R E THAN

AN

ENDLESS RANGE OF PRICES AND IT'S ALWAYS NAT-
URAL A N D USUAL FOR THE SALESMAN TO URGE THE
HIGH PRICE.
The students and young men of the town wear Schneider's $3()
Clothes because they are spruce, substantial and smart.
Gentlemen, there is a psychology in our one - price argument
that none can undo or outdo, and that is our collection of New
Season Suits and Overcoats at $30
To com pete with what you thought
it tO k$ 0 0b y
1
But you must see them and feel of their quality
to fully appreciate their real value.
We invite any kind of a comparison. A visit here
will convince you.
Ir
Clothes for Men
804 East LIbert
1
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4

The greatest sufferers when an
Ann Arbor rooming house burns
are usually Students BECAUSE
THEY CARRY NO INSURANCE
on their clothing and books. The
price of admission to one Movie
will pay for $100.00 insurance and
even if you suffer no loss there
is that feeling of security which
is worth much. Transfers of cov-

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